Do you look at the world around you and wonder about the relationship between humans and our environment? Are you a problem solver in search of a well-rounded environmental science toolkit?

As an environmental science major, you’ll study how human activity affects the environment, and how environmental problems affect humans. The scientific process will become second nature as you use it to explore questions about the natural world. You'll learn from experts across a range of natural science disciplines, especially geosciences, biology, and chemistry.

And by the time you graduate, you'll have firsthand experience devising scientific solutions to the environmental challenges our world faces today and tomorrow.

Life After Lawrence

Lawrentians enjoy careers in...

climate modeling, sustainability, forestry, environmental engineering, water resource management, soil science, environmental chemistry, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems

Lawrentians have gone on for advanced degrees in...

ecology, geosciences, agronomy, forestry, climate science, resource management, environmental law

Customize your studies to your interests

Students are encouraged to design a thematic connection for their natural science & lab electives. You might focus, for example, on building a slate of courses around water resources, geochemistry, food systems, or aquatic ecology.

Apply your learning to address local issues

Connect theory and practice through local applications. Recent topics have included race & urban ecologies, carbon accounting, environmental justice, wilderness, and bicycling.

Pick a problem. Solve it.

The capstone sequence develops the environmental scientist by authentic engagement with an environmental challenge of your interest. We learn together how to go from question formation to devising a research strategy, data collection and analysis, and presentation of results to both professional and community audiences.

Learn to work with a variety of viewpoints

The ENST 300 course, which is required of both Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors, encourages interaction between the majors and ensures that student groups will have a diversity of training and view points to bring to bear on the topic at hand.

Components of the Major

  • Intro to Environmental Science (lab)
  • Intro to Environmental Policy
  • Project-based environmental symposium
  • Principles of Chemistry
  • Remote Sensing or Geography of Life
  • One elective in statistics or quantitative analysis
  • One cross-listed elective from the arts, humanities, or social sciences
  • One elective in ecology
  • One elective in environmental chemistry
  • One elective in natural systems in time
  • Four courses in the natural sciences, two of which must be lab-based and three of which must be 200 or above
  • Junior research design seminar
  • Senior capstone seminar

Senior Experiences

The capstone sequence, Junior Seminar and Senior Capstone, develops the environmental scientist by authentic engagement with an environmental challenge of your interest. We learn together how to go from question formation to devising a research strategy, data collection and analysis, and presentation of results to both professional and community audiences.

 

Recent Senior Experiences include:

PurpleAir Sensors: New Instrumentation to Enhance Community Participation in Particulate Matter Monitoring Near Industrial Activity and Improve Relationships between Scientists and the Public

Quantification of The Cayman Island's Coral Reef Ecosystem Services

Analyzing the Viability of High Elevation Dunes as Seed Refuges for *Cirsium pitcheri*

 

Understanding Urban Pollination: assessing insect populations in restored prairies on Chicago’s south lakefront

Grey Wolf Population Dynamics in Wisconsin

Why Did the Turtle Cross the Road? Spatial Modeling to Inform Conservation of the Endangered Blanding's Turtle