Winter Term 2021 Virtual Courses

Open to All Lawrence University Students

For Winter Term 2021, the Lawrence University London Centre will be offering classes in a remote, synchronous model to ALL interested Lawrence University students. These classes fulfill general education requirements and contribute to students' GPA.

For days and times please check the course catalogue once it becomes available. All classes will include meetings via Zoom at times matching the Appleton class schedule.

Winter Term courses will complement, not replace, courses of the same title offered in-person during Spring Term, i.e., students planning to study at the London Centre during Spring Term can still take these classes in Winter term. On-site Spring Term classes might be taken for Independent Study credit, for example, or may comprise different plays/topics and assignments.Spring Term subject matter should not repeat or overlap what is offered in the Winter Term. Note: You do NOT need to be planning to travel to the London Centre to take these classes. They are open to all Lawrence students.

To view available courses and descriptions, click on the Winter Term 2021 Course Offerings link below.

Winter Term 2021 Course Offerings

Click + to expand.

Dept. Code Course Title Time Units Professor
HIST 150 Turbulence and Transformation: Stuart England, 1603-1714

TT
9-10:50

6 Erin Scheopner
UNIC 260 British Life and Culture

WF
9-10:10

3 Dr. Kate Connelly
ENG 203 Literary London

MWF
9:50-11

6 Susie Thomas
ENG 171/THAR 174 Literature of the Irish Troubles NEW

MWF
12:30-1:40

6 Christine Hoenigs
THAR 257 Diversity on the London Stage

MWF
1:50-3

6 Christine Hoenigs
THAR 172/ENG 172 Modern Irish Drama NEW

TT
12:30-2:20

6 Christine Hoenigs

Course Descriptions

HIST 150 - Turbulence and Transformation: Stuart England, 1603-1714 - Erin Scheopner - 6 units

Stuart England was a time of turbulence and transformation. Over little more than a century, the country experienced multiple civil wars as succeeding Stuart monarchs sought in vain to contain religious division and political dissent in an attempt to rule by divine right. Beginning with the coronation of James I and the Gunpowder Plot, and ending with the establishment of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, we will explore the key developments and the changing structures and dynamics of political participation in an era that bridges the Middle Ages and the modern world. The course combines lectures and classroom discussion with in-depth investigations of primary sources to establish a connection with Stuart England that surveys its physical and cultural traces in the contemporary U.K.

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Dr. Kate Connelly - 3 units

British life and culture are major exports: the monarchy, the English countryside, Downton Abbey, the Union Jack, the Premier League are variously evoked as the epitome of "Britishness."  This course probes beneath the all-too stale and static façade, critically examining who controls notions of British life and culture.  It will ask how race; sex; class; nationality; religion; sexuality; and turbulent, contested histories inform the the divisions, inequalities and lived experiences within modern Britain.  We’ll be ripping up the airbrushed postcard view of Britain and exploring its unparalleled diversity.  Students will get to uncover its richness for themselves through conducting detailed research into a place of their choice – the stories of the Afro-Caribbean community in Brixton, the legacy of Belfast’s divided past, the strange melancholy of a seaside town, industrial towns in decline, "gentrification" in the city, the forest that inspired Shakespeare . . . ?  It's yours to explore.


ENG 203 - Literary London - Susie Thomas - 6 units

“The city blew the windows of my brain wide open.” Hanif Kureishi
Literary London will explore a variety of texts, including William Blake, Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Sam Selvon, and Xiaolu Guo, in order to analyse how writers have attempted to capture a sense of this vast, vibrant and diverse city. Students will be encouraged to think historically, in terms of the way London and its representations have changed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms (e.g., poetry, novels, essays, film). We will examine the significance of class in the 19th-century, the changing role of women in the city, the influence of metropolitan culture on modernism, and London’s development as a world city. Come prepared to engage in lively debate, and leave as lovers of literary London.

ENG 171/THAR 174 - Literature of the Irish Troubles (NEW!) - Christine Hoenigs - 6 units

Imagine living in a country where every school run is an act of defiance - or an act of provocation. Where a "peace wall" divides your neighbourhood from the next. Where your name, the way you speak, or where you live gives away which side of the conflict you are on. Imagine being born into a world of sectarian violence which will leave over 3,600 people dead - and thousands scarred for the rest of their lives. This class will discuss poetry, novels, short stories, film scripts and first hand accounts of the civil war called The Troubles. The literature produced throughout this period and in the aftermath of the Good Friday Agreement tries to make sense of a bloody conflict, which even now is far from over. We will read pieces by writers from both sides of the Irish border, including Seamus Heaney, Bernard McLaverty, John B. Keane, Seamus Deane and Anna Burns, and also look at the conflict through the eyes of filmmakers such as Steve McQueen, Yann Demange, Pat Murphy, and Pat O'Connor.

THAR 257 - Diversity on the London Stage - - Christine Hoenigs - 6 units

Catalog Description: This seminar discusses how London theatre is addressing diversity with regard to race, ethnic background, gender, sexuality, religion, disability, and mental health. We will read a variety of play texts and discuss recent productions at different London theatres, analyze reviews of performances, and talk with theatre practitioners about their work. In play text reviews, presentations, projects, and a paper, students will demonstrate their individual engagement with the plays studied. Attributes: Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

THAR 172/ENG 172 - Modern Irish Drama (NEW!) - Christine Hoenigs - 6 units

We will read and discuss contemporary Irish playwrights (starting with Brendan Behan and finishing with the latest play by David Ireland, "Cyprus Avenue"), whose plays have given the world a deeper understanding of what it means to be Irish today. These plays are about personal issues such as the quest for belonging in a divided society and country, through the violence of the civil war ("The Troubles") and the peace process after the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998.  Irish society is undergoing a radical process of modernisation and reform, and the plays record the gradual shift in society on a personal level: the effects of exile and returning, the concept of home, the importance of language, memory and loss, and the growing sense of liberalism as opposed to the conservative influences of the Catholic church. Christina Reid, Owen McCafferty, Brian Friel, Enda Walsh, Stewart Parker and Anne Devlin are just a few of the many playwrights whose works will feature in this class that aims to offer students a first glimpse into the wealth of Irish storytelling today.

Spring Term 2021 Course Schedule and Descriptions

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Dept. Code

Course Title Requirement Units Professor
ANTH 372 Urban Anthropology of London D 6 Prof. Nicholas James
ENGL/THAR 170 Shakespeare in London -- 6 Prof. Christine Hoenigs
ARHI 247 Art Now: Contemporary Art in London -- 6 Prof. Helen Walter
TBA Music and the Great War -- 6 Prof. Jeff Stannard
TBA Sounding London: Identity, Space, and Place   6 Prof. Jeff Stannard
HIST/GLST 273 London: A City Shaped by Migration D, G 6 TBD
UNIC 264 Internship Seminar -- 6 Prof. Christine Hoenigs
UNIC 260 British Life and Culture -- 2 Prof. Kate Connelly
MUIN 355 London Music Lessons -- 3 Prof. Jeff Stannard

Spring Term 2021 Course Descriptions

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology of London – Professor James – 6 units

Catalog Description:  This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ENGL/THAR 170 – Shakespeare in London – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units

Catalog Description: Students will study several plays by William Shakespeare selected from among the current offerings by the Royal Shakespeare and other companies. Discussions will address the plays themselves, production techniques, and the audiences to whom they appeal. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study.  Students must register for ENG 170 and may submit a cross list request form to have the class listed on academic records as THAR 170. Attributes (ENGL 170): Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course
Attributes (THAR 170): Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Introductory Course

ARHI 247- Art Now: Contemporary Art in London- Professor Walter- 6 units

Catalog Description:  This seminar will introduce students to the historical framework and theoretical tools to critically experience and examine the practices of contemporary British art through site visits to London museums, galleries, and studios. Students will explore such topics as: British and global identity, art as instruments of socio-political change, art reception, the changing gallery system, the global art market, DIY practices, and new media and technology.  Attributes:  Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

TBA - Music and the Great War - Professor Stannard- 6 units

Catalog Description:  World War I killed millions and destroyed empires while demonstrating the gruesome potential of modern, mechanized warfare.  Ironically, the ‘war to end all wars’ led directly to World War II and we continue to wrestle with its impact even now.  In this course, students will look at the roles music played during the Great War and explore ways the conflict affected the creation and performance of music of all types, from the concert hall and the home front to the trenches.  By looking back through the lens of the 21st century, we will consider how the music was originally created and experienced and how musical meaning and perception can change due to differing contexts and perspectives.  Attributes:  TBA

TBA - Sounding London: Identity, Space, and Place - Professor Stannard- 6 units

Catalog Description:  Internationally recognized as a cosmopolitan centre of artistic activity due to its history and diversity, London offers unsurpassed opportunities to hear live music.  For this course, students will attend a wide range of musical events, from traditional concerts to innovative - and perhaps even surprising - performances.  Discussion will focus on how factors such as identity, space, and place affect the way we experience music.  Attributes:  TBA

HIST/GLST 273- London: A City Shaped by Migration- TBD - 6 units

Catalog Description:  This class studies the lasting effects of migration on London as a global city. We will analyze historic and current influxes of people and how they have changed the structure, identity, and culture of London.  Students will explore London neighborhoods and meet people who have found a new home here.  Assignments and experiential learning will allow students to fully engage with London in a meaningful way. Attributes:  Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), Diversity-Global GER (01cr), Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Connelly – 2 units

Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

Fall Term 2021 Course Schedule and Descriptions

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Dept. Code

Course Title Requirement Units Professor
ANTH 372 Urban Anthropology of London D 6 Nicholas James
THAR 279 Fringe Theatre in London -- 6 Ashley Scott Layton
ARHI 247 Art Now: Contemporary Art in London (normally in Spring) -- 6 Helen Walter
MUCO 131/431 The Grand Tour: Musical Taste and Manners in Europe 1600-1750 (normally in Spring) -- 6 STAFF
HIST/GLST 273 London: A City Shaped by Migration (normally in Spring) D, G 6 STAFF
UNIC 264 Internship Seminar -- 6 Christine Hoenigs
UNIC 260 British Life and Culture -- 2 Kate Connelly
MUIN 355 London Music Lessons -- 3 Jeff Stannard

Fall Term 2021 Course Descriptions

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology of London – Nicholas James – 6 units

Catalog Description:  This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

THAR 279 – Fringe Theatre in London – Ashley Scott Layton – 6 units

Catalog Description: This course will attempt to define Fringe Theatre (a movement started in 1968) and to categorize its main elements. The class shall attend a wide variety of plays and venues and come to an understanding of how the fringe has changed over the years. Discussions will address production techniques, the plays themselves, the audiences to whom they appeal, and to what extent the fringe is still an important theatrical force. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ARHI 247- Art Now: Contemporary Art in London - Helen Walter- 6 units

Catalog Description:  This seminar will introduce students to the historical framework and theoretical tools to critically experience and examine the practices of contemporary British art through site visits to London museums, galleries, and studios. Students will explore such topics as: British and global identity, art as instruments of socio-political change, art reception, the changing gallery system, the global art market, DIY practices, and new media and technology.  Attributes:  Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

MUCO 131/431- The Grand Tour: Musical Taste and Manners in Europe 1600-1750 - STAFF - 6 units

Catalog Description: A study of music in the Baroque period, its social and historical context and relationship to other arts. The course explores the depth and variety of 17th and 18th century musical life and follows a broad range of interests to suit both music majors and non-specialists. Museum visits and weekly concerts, with accompanying lectures; demonstrations by performers active in the field of historical performance practice; and readings on form, style, and the lives of composers. A number of concerts and outside visits will be organized, and students will be encouraged to attend relevant performances in London, for which they will be prepared in class. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr). 131: The course is general in scope and no prior musical knowledge will be expected. Does not satisfy course requirements for any music major. Not open to students who have previously received, or need to receive credit for MUCO 431. 431: The course is a seminar involving independent research. Not open to students who have previously received credit for MUHI 131. Prerequisite: MUCO 201 and 202

HIST/GLST 273- London: A City Shaped by Migration- TBD - 6 units

Catalog Description:  This class studies the lasting effects of migration on London as a global city. We will analyze historic and current influxes of people and how they have changed the structure, identity, and culture of London.  Students will explore London neighborhoods and meet people who have found a new home here.  Assignments and experiential learning will allow students to fully engage with London in a meaningful way. Attributes:  Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), Diversity-Global GER (01cr), Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Christine Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Kate Connelly – 2 units

Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Jeff Stannard – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

Winter Term 2022 Course Schedule and Descriptions

Click + to expand.

Dept. Code

Course Title Requirement Units Professor
ARHI 246* 19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain -- 6 Helen Walter
GOVT 385 Modern British Politics -- 6 Kate Connelly
THAR 257 Diversity on the London Stage D 6 Christine Hoenigs
ENG 203 Literary London -- 6 Susie Thomas
HIST 150 Turbulence and Transformation: Stuart England 1603-1714 -- 6 Erin Sheopner
UNIC 264 Internship Seminar -- 6 Christine Hoenigs
UNIC 260 British Life and Culture -- 2 Kate Connelly
MUIN 355 London Music Lessons -- 3 Jeff Stannard

*To be alternated with London’s Built Environment: 600 Years of Architecture (ARHI 248)

Winter Term 2022 Course Descriptions

ARHI 246 – 19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain – Helen Walter – 6 units

Catalog Description: In the 19th century, Britain was at the height of her imperial and industrial powers, with a burgeoning middle class with increased spending power. Against this background, this course examines the painting (including Turner, Constable, the Pre-Raphaelites, the High Victorians), architecture, furniture, and interiors of the period, utilizing the wealth of examples in London’s museums, galleries, and buildings. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

GOVT 385 – Modern British Politics – Kate Connelly – 6 units

Catalog Description: This course analyzes the central structures and processes of British politics, the important policy issues of recent years, British attitudes toward the political system, and critiques of British politics and history. Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

THAR 257 - Diversity on the London Stage - Christine Hoenigs - 6 units

Catalog Description: This seminar discusses how London theatre is addressing diversity with regard to race, ethnic background, gender, sexuality, religion, disability, and mental health. We will see theatre productions at different London theatres, analyze both performances and play texts, and talk with theatre practitioners about their work. In reviews, presentations, projects, and a paper, students will demonstrate their individual engagement with London. Attributes: Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ENG 203 - Literary London - Susie Thomas - 6 units

Catalog Description: This course studies literature created in and about London, from Medieval poetry, short stories, journals to newspaper sequels and contemporary novels. We will walk in the footsteps of London-born writers and those who made London their home to find out how their writings have captured social, political, and cultural changes. A variety of assignments will allow students to engage individually with London. Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

HIST 150 - Turbulence and Transformation: Stuart England 1603-1714 - Erin Sheopner - 6 units

Catalog Description:  Stuart England was a time of turbulence and transformation. Over little more than a century, the country experienced multiple civil wars as succeeding Stuart monarchs sought in vain to contain religious division and political dissent in an attempt to rule by divine right. Beginning with the coronation of James I and the Gunpowder Plot, and ending with the establishment of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, we will explore the key developments and the changing structures and dynamics of political participation in an era that bridges the Middle Ages and the modern world. The course combines lectures and classroom discussion with in-depth investigations of primary sources to establish a connection with Stuart England that surveys its physical and cultural traces in the contemporary U.K.

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Connelly – 2 units

Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

Spring Term 2022 Course Schedule and Descriptions

Click + to expand.

Dept. Code

Course Title Requirement Units Professor
ANTH 372 Urban Anthropology of London D 6 Nicholas James
ENGL/THAR 170 Shakespeare in London -- 6 Christine Hoenigs
HIST 247 Impact of Empire on Great Britain, 1815-1914 (usually Fall Term) G, W 6 STAFF
ECON 214 Markets of London -- 6 Adam Galambos
ECON 216 Socialism and Capitalism in Britain, Past and Present -- 6 Adam Galambos
UNIC 264 Internship Seminar -- 6 Prof. Christine Hoenigs
UNIC 260 British Life and Culture -- 2 Prof. Kate Connelly
MUIN 355 London Music Lessons -- 3 Prof. Jeff Stannard

Spring Term 2022 Course Descriptions

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology of London – Professor James – 6 units

Catalog Description:  This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ENGL/THAR 170 – Shakespeare in London – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units

Catalog Description: Students will study several plays by William Shakespeare selected from among the current offerings by the Royal Shakespeare and other companies. Discussions will address the plays themselves, production techniques, and the audiences to whom they appeal. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study.  Students must register for ENG 170 and may submit a cross list request form to have the class listed on academic records as THAR 170. Attributes (ENGL 170): Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course
Attributes (THAR 170): Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Introductory Course

HIST 247- Impact of Empire on Great Britain, 1815-1914- STAFF - 6 units

Catalog Description: In 1914 the British Empire contained a population of over 400 million people and was territorially the largest empire in world history. While the British spread their ideas about government, language, religion, and culture to their colonies, Britain itself was also profoundly influenced by the colonies it ruled. This course will explore aspects of the impact of the Empire on British politics, economics, society, and popular culture during the 19th century. Among the topics to be covered are the anti-slavery movement, imperialism and new imperialism, jingoism and popular culture, economic responses, and the influence of imperialism on culture and the arts. The myriad resources of London will be used to provide specific examples of how important the Empire was in shaping British identity and institutions during the 19th century. (G&C or E) Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Global GER (01cr), Writing Intensive GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ECON 214 - Markets of London - Adam Galambos - 6 units

Catalog Description:  The word “market” is likely to conjure up an image of a supply curve crossing a demand curve in economics students’ minds. Outside economics classes, however, markets are vibrant, bustling centers of community life, meeting places, crossroads, and, of course, places of exchange. And London, with its many markets of all kinds, is the perfect place to put real markets into “market economics.” London was the largest city in the world for much of the 19th century, and markets played an important role in its economic life. In addition to local and regional trade, London was (and is) a trading town on a global scale as well. This course serves as an introduction to market economics through the lens of actual, real-world markets. We will also explore the economy and economic history of London itself through the histories of some of its marketplaces. Where do the products come from? Who makes them, who sells them and how, and who consumes them? Who runs the market itself? This course assumes no previous background in economics, and we will rely on verbal, conceptual reasoning rather than formal models.

ECON 216 - Socialism and Capitalism in Britain, Past and Present - Adam Galambos - 6 units

Catalog Description:  Britain is the birthplace of industrial capitalism, and the roots of modern mainstream economics go back to British political economists such as Adam Smith, John Stuart Mill, Alfred Marshall, John Maynard Keynes, and others. But the roots of socialism also lead us to Britain. The Poor Laws of the 16th century can be seen as the precursors of the welfare system. The reform of the Poor Laws in the 19th century led to a robust debate in which the young science of political economy played an important, and, many have argued, disastrous role. In the same era, the most successful “Utopian socialist,” Robert Owen, created a model for the welfare system in New Lanark, and advocated for his vision of socialism in the House of Commons in the UK, and later also in the House of Representatives in the US. Still in Owen’s lifetime, Karl Marx spent his days in the British Library writing his famous Capital, and Friedrich Engels wrote his book on The Condition of the Working Class in England after a visit to Manchester. The First International took place in London in 1864, and a robust labor movement continued at least until the end of the twentieth century. In literature, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and George Orwell’s Animal Farm and 1984 present dystopian versions of the economic and political systems of the future. Much of this very rich intellectual history is tied to London. This course will introduce students to the study of economic systems through the rich history of socialism and capitalism in Britain. Through a combination of economic history and the history of ideas, we will explore the development of capitalism as well as the evolution of the welfare system, the labor movement, and socialist proposals. We will put current public discourse and ongoing debates on socialism into a historical context. This course assumes no previous background in economics, and we will rely on verbal, conceptual reasoning rather than formal models.

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Connelly – 2 units

Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

Additional Information

Learn more about studying in London by clicking the links below.

One or Two Terms?

Spring 2021 Visiting Faculty Courses

Spring 2022 Visiting Faculty Courses

Internships

Independent Study

Music Lessons

London Centre Faculty

Previous Visiting Faculty

Spring 2021 Visiting Professor Jeffrey Stannard

Professor Jeffrey Stannard photo

Learn about the music of London Spring 2021!

Sounding London: Identity, Space, and Place - Attend a wide range of musical events and learn how factors such as identity, space, and place affect the way we experience music.

Music and the Great War - Look at the roles music played during the Great War and explore ways the conflict affected the creation and performance of music of all types, from the concert hall and the home front to the trenches.

Full descriptions can be viewed HERE.

Spring 2022 Visiting Professor Adam Galambos

Adam Galambos profile pictureAdam Galambos is the Dwight and Marjorie Peterson Professor of Innovation and Associate Professor of Economics. As Visiting Professor at the London Centre in Spring 2022, he will be teaching the following two Economics courses:

Econ 214: Markets of London: This course serves as an introduction to market economics through the lens of actual, real-world markets. We will also explore the economy and economic history of London itself through the histories of some of its marketplaces.

Econ 216: Socialism and Capitalism in Britain, Past and Present: This course will introduce students to the study of economic systems through the rich history of socialism and capitalism in Britain. Through a combination of economic history and the history of ideas, we will explore the development of capitalism as well as the evolution of the welfare system, the labor movement, and socialist proposals. We will put current public discourse and ongoing debates on socialism into a historical context.

No previous background in economics is required. Classes will rely on verbal, conceptual reasoning rather than formal models.

Full descriptions can be viewed HERE.

Two Terms in London

We encourage students to study at the London Centre for two consecutive terms.  Spending two terms at the London Centre allows students greater immersion into and engagement with the range of opportunities in London.  And with our new financial aid policy, it has never been so easy and affordable to study abroad! To learn more, go to One or Two Terms?