London Centre students take a roster of courses designed to meaningfully engage with the topic utilizing the resources of the city.  All London Centre students take the core course, British Life and Culture, in addition to elective classes.  The core course has been designed so that students may pursue three elective courses (20 units total). London Centre elective courses do not have limited enrollment or prerequisites and are, therefore, open to any London Centre student.  Students participating in the Internship program will take the Internship Seminar course in place of one of their elective classes.

2018-19 London Centre Course Schedule and Descriptions

Fall Term 2018

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology – Professor James – 6 units
This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

THAR 279- Fringe Theatre in London- Professor Scott Layton - 6 units
This course will attempt to define Fringe Theatre (a movement started in 1968) and to categorize its main elements. The class shall attend a wide variety of plays and venues and come to an understanding of how the fringe has changed over the years. Discussions will address production techniques, the plays themselves, the audiences to whom they appeal, and to what extent the fringe is still an important theatrical force. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

HIST 247- Impact of Empire on Great Britain, 1815-1914- Professor Dobbs- 6 units

In 1914 the British Empire contained a population of over 400 million people and was territorially the largest empire in world history. While the British spread their ideas about government, language, religion, and culture to their colonies, Britain itself was also profoundly influenced by the colonies it ruled. This course will explore aspects of the impact of the Empire on British politics, economics, society, and popular culture during the 19th century. Among the topics to be covered are the anti-slavery movement, imperialism and new imperialism, jingoism and popular culture, economic responses, and the influence of imperialism on culture and the arts. The myriad resources of London will be used to provide specific examples of how important the Empire was in shaping British identity and institutions during the 19th century. (G&C or E) Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Global GER (01cr), Writing Intensive GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

PHYS 119 - Victorian Engineering - Professor Martin-6 units
This class will investigate classical physics through field trips combined with classroom discussion. In this course, London will serve as a unique laboratory to investigate classical physics through field trips to engineering edifices combined with classroom discussion to expose the underlying science.  Topics include: statics and mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, and electricity and magnetism. Engineering sites to be visited include Iron Bridge, London Museum of Water and Steam, Regent’s Canal, and London Underground.  Attributes: Natural Sciences Laboratory GER (01cr), Quantitative Analysis GER (01cr)

PHYS 115 - The Royal Society and the Birth of Modern Science - Professor Martin-6 units
In many ways, the Royal Society of London (Founded in 1660) and its publication gave rise to a modern version of scientific progress, resting on scientific publishing and peer review This course will use the history of the Royal Society as a lens through which to view the rise of science as it is now practiced, looking at the first scientific journal, Philosophical Transactions (1665).  The course will include visits to the Royal Society, readings of original articles from the Philosophical Transactions, and classroom discussion.

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Connelly – 2 units
Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.
 

Winter Term 2019

ARHI 246 - 19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain – Professor Barnes – 6 units
Catalog Description: In the 19th century, Britain was at the height of her imperial and industrial powers, with a burgeoning middle class with increased spending power. Against this background, this course examines the painting (including Turner, Constable, the Pre-Raphaelites, the High Victorians), architecture, furniture, and interiors of the period, utilizing the wealth of examples in London’s museums, galleries, and buildings. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

GOVT 385 - Modern British Politics – Professor Connelly – 6 units
Catalog Description: This course analyzes the central structures and processes of British politics, the important policy issues of recent years, British attitudes toward the political system, and critiques of British politics and history. Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

THAR 211- Introduction to London Theatre- Professor Hoenigs-6 units                                                
Introduction to a critical approach to theatrical performance. Students read play scripts before attending a wide range of plays in a variety of performance spaces in London, working towards a developed understanding of dramatic form. Study of literary and theatrical conventions is designed to enhance students’ critical sophistication. The course aims to teach students the basic vocabulary of critical terms for thinking about plays in performance and increase their awareness of how their responses may be affected by a play. The course takes advantage of performances and opportunities uniquely available in London. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 203 – British Crime Fiction – Professor Harris – 6 units
Catalog Description: The course will offer a survey of the development of crime fiction in Britain from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Taught as a lecture/discussion class, it will also attempt to exploit the London setting to provide a physical context for some of the work under scrutiny. Students will be able to develop their analytical and writing skills, and should expect to achieve a good grasp of the characteristics of genre fiction; they should also be able to recognize the contribution that a study of these popular forms can make to developing a broader understanding of the values and concerns of the society within which they arise. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

HIST 150- Stuart England 1603-1714- Staff-6 units                                                                          
This course explores the causes and impact of the English Civil War, the effect of the Restoration, the Glorious Revolution, and the path to the Hanoverian Succession. The economics, politics, religion, social history, and cultural aspects of the period are also studied. Visits to museums and buildings of the period are included. (E) Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Connelly – 2 units
Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.
 

Spring Term 2019

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology – Professor James – 6 units
Catalog Description: This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ENGL/THAR 170 – Shakespeare in London – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units
Catalog Description: Students will study several plays by William Shakespeare selected from among the current offerings by the Royal Shakespeare and other companies. Discussions will address the plays themselves, production techniques, and the audiences to whom they appeal. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study.  Students must register for ENG 170 and may submit a cross list request form to have the class listed on academic records as THAR 170.
Attributes (ENGL 170): Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course
Attributes (THAR 170): Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Introductory Course

ARHI 246-19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain- Professor Barnes-6 units

Catalog Description:  In the 19th century, Britain was at the height of her imperial and industrial powers, with a burgeoning middle class with increased spending power. Against this background, this course examines the painting (including Turner, Constable, the Pre-Raphaelites, the High Victorians), architecture, furniture, and interiors of the period, utilizing the wealth of examples in London’s museums, galleries, and buildings. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

MUCO 131/431 – The Grand Tour: Musical Taste and Manners in Europe 1600-1750 - Professor Charlston – 6 units
Catalog Description:  A study of music in the Baroque period, its social and historical context and relationship to other arts. The course explores the depth and variety of 17th and 18th century musical life and follows a broad range of interests to suit both music majors and non-specialists. Museum visits and weekly concerts, with accompanying lectures; demonstrations by performers active in the field of historical performance practice; and readings on form, style, and the lives of composers.  A number of concerts and outside visits will be organized, and students will be encouraged to attend relevant performances in London, for which they will be prepared in class. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr).
131: The course is general in scope and no prior musical knowledge will be expected.  Does not satisfy course requirements for any music major.  Not open to students who have previously received, or need to receive credit for MUCO 431.
431: The course is a seminar involving independent research.  Not open to students who have previously received credit for MUHI 131.  Prerequisite: MUCO 201 and 202

UNIC 262 – ‘The Fields Beneath’: Discovering London’s Histories – Professor Harris – 6 units
Catalog Description: This interdisciplinary course aims to give students a thorough grounding in the chronology of London’s development from Roman settlement on the periphery of Empire to 21st-century “World City.” The use of contemporary literary and visual sources will serve both to develop students’ historical imagination and to enable them critically to examine the concepts involved in the discipline of history itself. Alongside this historical approach, a theoretical examination of specific themes and topics will be used to explore the nature of “the town as palimpsest,” a layered structure in which the past is never entirely obliterated by what succeeds it. Examples of such themes and topics might include, inter alia, religious observance, theatrical presentation, immigration, commerce, domestic life, and government. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Connelly – 2 units
Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

2019-20 London Centre Course Schedule

FALL 2019

Dept. Code Course Title Requirement Units Professor
ANTH 372 Urban Anthropology of London D 6 Prof. Nicholas James
HIST 247 Impact of Empire on Great Britain, 1815-1914 G, W 6 Staff
RLST/GLST 281 Religion and Globalization G 6 Prof. Martyn Smith
RLST/MSTU 281 Ancient Civilizations and the British Museum   6 Prof. Martyn Smith
THAR 279 Fringe Theatre in London   6 Prof. Ashley Scott Layton
UNIC 264 Internship Seminar   6 Prof. Christine Hoenigs
UNIC 260 British Life and Culture   2 Prof. Kate Connelly
MUIN 355 London Music Lessons   3

Prof. Jeff Stannard

 

WINTER 2020

Dept. Code Course Title Requirement Units Professor
ARHI 246 19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain   6 Staff
ENG 203 Literary London   6 Prof. Christine Hoenigs
GOVT 385 Modern British Politics   6 Prof. Kate Connelly
HIST 150 Stuart England 1603-1714   6 Staff
THAR 257 Diversity on the London Stage D 6 Prof. Ashley Scott Layton
UNIC 264 Internship Seminar   6 Prof. Christine Hoenigs
UNIC 260 British Life and Culture   2 Prof. Kate Connelly
MUIN 355 London Music Lessons   3 Prof. Jeff Stannard

 

SPRING 2020

Dept. Code Course Title Requirement Units Professor
ANTH 372 Urban Anthropology in London D 6 Prof. Nicholas James
ARHI 247 Art Now- Contemporary Art in London   6 Staff
ENGL/THAR 170 Shakespeare in London   6 Prof. Christine Hoenigs
HIST/GLST 273 London- A City Shaped by Migration D, G 6 Staff
MUCO 133/433 Perspectives on Genius:  The Life and Work of Beethoven   6 Prof. Terence Charlston
UNIC 264 Internship Seminar   6 Prof. Christine Hoenigs
UNIC 260 British Life and Culture   2 Prof. Kate Connelly
MUIN 355 London Music Lessons   3 Prof. Jeff Stannard

 

2019-20 London Centre Course Descriptions

Fall 2019

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology – Professor James – 6 units

Catalog Description:  This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

HIST 247- Impact of Empire on Great Britain, 1815-1914- Staff- 6 units

Catalog Description:  In 1914 the British Empire contained a population of over 400 million people and was territorially the largest empire in world history. While the British spread their ideas about government, language, religion, and culture to their colonies, Britain itself was also profoundly influenced by the colonies it ruled. This course will explore aspects of the impact of the Empire on British politics, economics, society, and popular culture during the 19th century. Among the topics to be covered are the anti-slavery movement, imperialism and new imperialism, jingoism and popular culture, economic responses, and the influence of imperialism on culture and the arts. The myriad resources of London will be used to provide specific examples of how important the Empire was in shaping British identity and institutions during the 19th century. (G&C or E) Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Global GER (01cr), Writing Intensive GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

RLST 281- Religion and Globalization- Professor Martyn Smith- 6 units

London is an ideal laboratory for examining how religious traditions that began in one part of the world are able to thrive in a whole new setting. This course will include readings that focus on the concept of globalization and its transformation of religious traditions, as well as field trips to sites of religious importance, including mosques, a Hindu and Sikh temple, and a Pentecostal church. Students will experience first-hand the relation of religion to the pressures of globalization, and carry away a positive sense of how these traditions enable people to cope with dislocation and change. Attributes:  Foundation/Gateway Course

RLST 281- Ancient Civilizations and the British Museum- Professor Martyn Smith- 6 units

The British Museum contains a wealth of material objects from the great civilizations of the ancient world. Once a week we will visit the British Museum and study the objects related to ancient civilizations. Our emphasis will be on ancient Greek, Egyptian, and Mesopotamian civilizations. Readings will give an introduction to these ancient cultures, and during our museum trips we will consider how the objects on display speak to us about the values and beliefs of those peoples. A second emphasis of this course will be the museum itself, its history and relation to the colonial past. What does it mean to create and display this vast collection of objects from around the world? The museum itself will become an object of study. Attributes:  Foundation/Gateway Course

THAR 279- Fringe Theatre in London- Professor Scott Layton - 6 units

Catalog Description:  This course will attempt to define Fringe Theatre (a movement started in 1968) and to categorize its main elements. The class shall attend a wide variety of plays and venues and come to an understanding of how the fringe has changed over the years. Discussions will address production techniques, the plays themselves, the audiences to whom they appeal, and to what extent the fringe is still an important theatrical force. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Connelly – 2 units

Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

Winter 2020

ARHI 246 - 19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain – Staff – 6 units

Catalog Description: In the 19th century, Britain was at the height of her imperial and industrial powers, with a burgeoning middle class with increased spending power. Against this background, this course examines the painting (including Turner, Constable, the Pre-Raphaelites, the High Victorians), architecture, furniture, and interiors of the period, utilizing the wealth of examples in London’s museums, galleries, and buildings. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ENG 203- Literary London- Professor Christine Hoenigs- 6 units

Catalog Description:  This course studies literature created in and about London, from Medieval poetry, short stories, journals to newspaper sequels and contemporary novels. We will walk in the footsteps of London-born writers and those who made London their home to find out how their writings have captured social, political, and cultural changes. A variety of assignments will allow students to engage individually with London. Attributes:  Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

GOVT 385 - Modern British Politics – Professor Connelly – 6 units

Catalog Description: This course analyzes the central structures and processes of British politics, the important policy issues of recent years, British attitudes toward the political system, and critiques of British politics and history. Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

HIST 150- Stuart England 1603-1714- Staff- 6 units                        

Catalog Description:  This course explores the causes and impact of the English Civil War, the effect of the Restoration, the Glorious Revolution, and the path to the Hanoverian Succession. The economics, politics, religion, social history, and cultural aspects of the period are also studied. Visits to museums and buildings of the period are included. (E) Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course

THAR 257- Diversity on the London Stage- Professor Scott Layton- 6 units                  

Catalog Description:  This seminar discusses how London theatre is addressing diversity with regard to race, ethnic background, gender, sexuality, religion, disability, and mental health. We will see theatre productions at different London theatres, analyze both performances and play texts, and talk with theatre practitioners about their work. In reviews, presentations, projects, and a paper, students will demonstrate their individual engagement with London. Attributes:  Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Connelly – 2 units

Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

Spring 2020

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology – Professor James – 6 units

Catalog Description: This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ARHI 247- Art Now- Contemporary Art in London- Staff- 6 Units

Catalog Description:  This seminar will introduce students to the historical framework and theoretical tools to critically experience and examine the practices of contemporary British art through site visits to London museums, galleries, and studios. Students will explore such topics as: British and global identity, art as instruments of socio-political change, art reception, the changing gallery system, the global art market, DIY practices, and new media and technology.  Attributes:  Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ENGL/THAR 170 – Shakespeare in London – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units

Catalog Description: Students will study several plays by William Shakespeare selected from among the current offerings by the Royal Shakespeare and other companies. Discussions will address the plays themselves, production techniques, and the audiences to whom they appeal. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study.  Students must register for ENG 170 and may submit a cross list request form to have the class listed on academic records as THAR 170.
Attributes (ENGL 170): Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course
Attributes (THAR 170): Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Introductory Course

HIST/GLST 273- London- A City Shaped by Migration- Staff- 6 units

Catalog Description:  This class studies the lasting effects of migration on London as a global city. We will analyze historic and current influxes of people and how they have changed the structure, identity, and culture of London.  Students will explore London neighborhoods and meet people who have found a new home here.  Assignments and experiential learning will allow students to fully engage with London in a meaningful way. Attributes:  Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), Diversity-Global GER (01cr), Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

MUCO 133/433 – Perspectives on Genius:  The Life and Work of Beethoven - Professor Charlston – 6 units

Catalog Description: Ludwig van Beethoven, arguably one of the most famous composers of all time, is a compelling and fascinating figure in classical music. He occupies a central position as the architect of musical Romanticism and his influence continues today. In additions to studying his music from the perspective of his own time, we will discuss his extraordinary creative personality and the reception of his music by subsequent composers and listeners. A number of concerts and outside visits will be organized, and students will be encouraged to attend relevant performances in London, for which they will be prepared in class. Attributes:  Fine Arts Div GER (01cr)


133: The course is general in scope and no prior musical knowledge will be expected.  Does not satisfy course requirements for any music major.  Not open to students who have previously received, or need to receive credit for MUCO 433.
433: The course is a seminar involving independent research.  Not open to students who have previously received credit for MUHI 133.  Prerequisite: MUCO 201 and 202

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Connelly – 2 units

Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor

Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

Internships

As London is a city with a wealth of opportunities, internship placements are available for students in the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts.

Interns spend 20 hours per week at their placements as well as participate in a 6-unit seminar with other internship students. Internship placements and coordination are facilitated by Florida State University (FSU), while the weekly 1-hour internship seminar is taught by the London Centre Director.

Interns will take part in an orientation with the FSU Internship Coordinator and the Director of the London Centre which outlines the structure of the internship programme and  Tier 4 visa duties, and introduces students to working life in London.

For a listing of possible placement areas, more information on the internship program, and some thoughts from former interns, please visit the Internship page.

Music Lessons

Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to do so. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of lessons, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U-only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Costs up to $500 for these lessons will be reimbursed by the London Centre. Students interested in pursuing lessons should see this page.

Independent Study in London

Students have the option to organize an Independent Study during their term in London with faculty in Appleton. London offers unique primary resources for research, including specialized libraries, archives, museums, cultural and socio-political institutions, and of course the city itself.  Students might conduct an Independent Study to research an ongoing academic interest in preparation of Senior Experience project or honors project. For further information, please see information about Independent Study at the London Centre and contact the Off-Campus Programs office to discuss your interest.

Fall 2019 Visiting Professor Martyn Smith

Take a look at the courses visiting professor Martyn Smith is offering in Fall Term 2019!

Two Terms in London

We encourage students to study at the London Centre for two consecutive terms.  Spending two terms at the London Centre allows students greater immersion into and engagement with the range of opportunities in London.  And with our new financial aid policy, it has never been so easy and affordable to study abroad!

A second term will give you extra time for a more in-depth exploration of London and networking in your field of interest. In your second term, you will take "British Life and Culture II" (registered as an Independent Study UNIC 399) allowing more time to delve into the intricacies of British culture.  BLC  II students participate in an adjusted version of the core British Life and Culture course and work with the instructor in adapting your participation and assignments for the second term.  You will be included in some aspects of the course that all students take but you will explore an individualized area or project of your interest in your second term be it poetry, sports culture, literature, music, history, or other areas.  As BLC II is a different course, you will not duplicate material of BLC. 

Choosing to participate in our internship programme could allow you to connect with Londoners on a new level and gather professional experience working abroad - a real bonus on any graduate's resume, as employers highly value the experience of long-term study abroad in candidates.

You might also consider possibilities for London to feature in your senior experience work.  You could develop your ideas during an Independent Study in London, conduct your own research project or gather ideas for your project while working closely with either your academic advisor in Appleton or London based faculty.

Participating in the program in winter and spring terms allows for the easiest transition and smoothest immigration path.  There are only a few days between winter and spring terms, which makes studying in London for these two consecutive terms a hassle-free experience - no need to move housing or spend money on an additional flight. Participating in the program in fall and winter terms is also possible but requires more coordinated planning and preparation.  In certain circumstances, we may need to limit fall/winter participation due to our annual allocation for immigration sponsorship required for fall/winter students.

Students interested in participating in the program for two consecutive terms should work with the Off-Campus Programs office while planning and applying to the program.

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