Please note: The course descriptions displayed here are current as of Tuesday, July 27, 2021, but the official Course Catalog should be used for all official planning.

GLST 100: Introduction to Global Studies

What does it mean to think globally? This discussion-based course invites students to explore how networks and flows of people, wealth, goods, ideas and information across vast distances have shaped human experience. Course materials draw on insights from a range of disciplines, enabling students to apply global perspectives to the study of issues such as identity, war, migration, commerce, artistic expression and communication.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing only; consent of instructor required for juniors and seniors

GLST 105: Cross-Cultural Interactions Along the Silk Road, 200 BCE - 1400 CE

The so-called "Silk Road" was the world's first superhighway, linking East Asia to the Mediterranean. The peoples along the way not only traded luxury goods, but also ideas, technology, and more. This course offers a thematic examination of the dynamic, cross-cultural interactions along the ancient and medieval Silk Road. (G & C)
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 105, East Asian Studies 105

GLST 110: The Emergence of the Modern World

An introduction to world history from 500 to 1750. Attention to global change through the emergence of world systems, as well as the development of worldwide commercial and colonial empires. Thematic focus on the nature of cross-cultural relations and the dynamics of power and resistance. Special emphasis on analysis of documents and historical interpretations. (G&C or E)
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 110

GLST 130: Art of Islamic Cultures

This course introduces students to the rich artistic traditions generated by Islamic cultures from the 7th century onward. While considering the Umayyad, Abbasid, Ilkhanid, and Mughal dynasties, among others, we examine architecture, illuminated manuscripts, metalwork, ceramics, and more. A broad selection of readings and activities supplements class discussions on themes that include the role of art in Islam, relationships between art and power, and the importance of cross-cultural exchange.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 130

GLST 140: Introduction to International Relations

An introductory study of the cultural, political, and economic interactions among states and non-state actors in global politics. Special attention is paid to key issues, including international security, foreign policy decision-making, and the role of diplomacy in promoting cooperation. Required for the interdisciplinary area in international studies.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 140

GLST 160: Traditional East Asian Civilization, 1800 B.C.-1600

An introductory survey of East Asia from the dawn of indigenous civilization to the 16th century. Focus on the growth of a Sinitic center and its interaction with the sedentary and nomadic peoples on its Inner Asian and Pacific rims. Emphasis on the diverse peoples and societies of the area and the historical processes that bound them together through a common tradition. (G&C)
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 160, East Asian Studies 140, Ethnic Studies 121

GLST 165: Modern East Asian Civilization, 1600-1990

An introductory survey of the modern history of East Asia, examining the efforts of traditional states, particularly China and Japan, to respond to Western intrusion into the region after 1600. Focus on social and cultural problems created by attempts to modernize yet defend tradition and on the differing results of Chinese and Japanese approaches. (G&C)
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 165, East Asian Studies 150

GLST 191: Directed Study in Global Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.

GLST 205: Cross-Cultural Contacts in the Early Modern World

Examines contacts among various peoples between 1350 and 1750. Focus on cultural or ethnic identity, the role of power in relations between groups, and theoretical problems involved in such study. Examples include ancient and medieval cultural contacts, European settlement in North and South America, the African slave trade, and contacts among the peoples of Southeast Asia, India, China, and Japan. (G&C)
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 205
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

GLST 206: Perchance to Dream: A Comparative History of Dreams from Antiquity to Present

For centuries, dream interpretation has been integrated into philosophical discourse, used as a political tool, and touted as proof of otherworldly activities. This seminar will examine dream theories as products of socio-cultural development in different historical contexts.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 206

GLST 207: Introduction to International Economics

This course aims to develop an understanding of international economic issues and policies in open economies. The course will provide a general body of knowledge on topics such as gains from trade; patterns of trade; effect of trade on welfare; exchange rate policy regimes; international organizations; financial crises; and the effect of government policies on trade and the exchange rate. You will get exposed to economic modeling and learn analytical tools that can be applied to understand the changing world economy and analyze problems in international economic policy. You are encouraged to explore the potential and limitations of international economics in dealing with real-world problems. This course will assist you in improving your economic writing skills as well as your ability to read critically and understand discussions on international economic issues in the press.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Economics 205
Prerequisite: ECON 100

GLST 217: Humanitarianism and Violence in Religious Traditions

This course will examine the religious motivations that have led religious groups to embrace global norms like human rights or reject them and turn to violence. We will examine liberation theology in Latin America and the writings of extremist thinker Sayyid Qutb. Much of the class will be centered on case studies such as Myanmar's Rohingya crisis where religion, immigration, and questions of human rights are at play. Offered in conjunction with Ripon College, with online interactions and travel to local places of worship.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 217
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

GLST 220: Topics in Global Studies

An intermediate course with a rotating topic determined by faculty in the Global Studies program. Topics will be wide-ranging, but will include a global perspective and contribute to one of the four global studies thematic tracks (human security, global cities, nations and identities, or arts and exchange). May be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.

GLST 245: Apple, Google, Facebook

The rhetoric surrounding technology invokes revolution and newness, but the products and services fit with the individualism of American (and global) views of self and society. We will examine both the positive visions offered by tech thinkers like Steward Brand and Ray Kurzweil, as well as the destructive results that occur as corporations “move fast and break things.” Students will complete a video critique of a digital platform.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 245
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

GLST 246: Comparative Politics of Less-Developed Countries

This course provides an introduction to politics in less-developed countries, paying close attention to differences within the so-called “developing world” and the impact of economic realities on politics. In doing so, it addresses questions about the relationship between economic development and democracy and the impact of globalization on poor countries.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 245
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and one of GOVT 110 or GOVT 140

GLST 248: Social Entrepreneurship

Social entrepreneurs all over the world adopt and implement innovative ideas in order to address some of the world's most pressing problems. In this course, students will study the many dimensions of social entrepreneurship, especially those ventures that address problems of human security. Students will work with a team to propose an entrepreneurial solution to one such problem.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Innovation & Entrepreneurship 245, Government 248
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

GLST 270: Theories of the Global

We live in an interconnected world of culture, goods, services and decisions exceeding national borders, but how do we understand what is happening and why? This seminar will complement economics and politics by considering postcolonialism, Marxism, feminism, critical theory and cultural studies in understanding global trends. Students will engage with critical paradigms and cultural artifacts in reading responses, written papers and a culminating project.
Units: 6.

GLST 271: Global Environmental Politics

This course provides an examination of the environment as an issue in world politics. Emphasis will be placed on the role of both state and non-state actors (i.e., the UN, NGOs) in global environmental regimes that are designed to deal with global warming, ozone depletion, and other environmental issues. Particular attention will be paid to the positions taken by both developed and developing countries. As part of the course, students will participate in a simulation of an international negotiation on an environmental issue.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 270, Environmental Studies 270
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or ENST 150 or GOVT 110

GLST 273: London, A City Shaped by Migration

This class studies the lasting effects of migration on London as a global city. We will analyze historic and current influxes of people and how they have changed the structure, identity, and culture of London. Students will explore London neighborhoods and meet people who have found a new home here. Assignments and experiential learning will allow students to fully engage with London in a meaningful way. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 273
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

GLST 280: Postcolonial Writers

An introduction to major postcolonial works in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Readings include novels by African, Asian, and Caribbean authors such as Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, and Jean Rhys.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 280, Ethnic Studies 280

GLST 284: The Spectacle of Edo Japan

This course will focus on the diverse artistic production and consumption practices within Edo-period Japan (1603-1868). Topics include the revival of classical Heian narratives like The Tale of Genji, the rise of an urban bourgeois culture, the prints and paintings depicting kabuki actors, courtesans, and ghosts, the reification of the tea ceremony and encounters with the West through trade.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 284, East Asian Studies 284
Prerequisite: ARHI 101 or 175 or sophomore standing

GLST 285: The Transformation of the Modern City: Tokyo, Seoul and Shanghai (1860-1945)

This course explores the transformation of the cityscape in Tokyo, Seoul, and Shanghai. Topics include the emergence of the modern artist, the search for an “avant-garde” of the East, the modernization of public and private spaces, the introduction of film and photography and the rise of the “modern girl.”
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 285, East Asian Studies 285
Prerequisite: ARHI 101 or 175 or sophomore standing

GLST 286: The Politics of Power in Modern and Contemporary Chinese Art

Over the past century, China has witnessed the arrival of Western Imperialism, mass rebellion, revolution, and radical reconstruction under the Communist regime. This class will trace how artists attempted to intervene in social life to change its course of development and how art continues to affect radical social change.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 286, East Asian Studies 286
Prerequisite: ARHI 101 or 175 or sophomore standing

GLST 290: Berlin: Experiencing a Great City (in English)

This course introduces students to one of the world's great cities. Classwork includes the history, culture, and literature of Berlin as well as preparations for a series of day-long walking tours of the city that students will conduct themselves for their classmates with the help of a guidebook. In addition, students will conduct comparative research on some aspect of life in the U.S. or Germany. Students must complete both the classroom portion of the course and the Berlin trip to receive credit. Taught in English. Not open to students who have previously received or need to receive credit for GER 389.
Units: 2 OR 6.
Also listed as German 290

GLST 291: Fld Experience Global Studies

This topics course will allow students to experience sites that highlight global issues (political, religous, environmental, or cultural) through a one- or two-week field experience accompanied by at least one professor. Students should register for this course in the term prior to the planned travel. Some field experiences will require registration in the term following the field experience in order to complete a research project.

Topic for 2018-19: Four Communities of Senegal
This class prepares students for a December trip to Senegal. It will give students the opportunity to experience the largest slave trading center on the Atlantic coast, and spend time in the current capital, Dakar. Students will learn about the lasting legacy of colonialism, the practice of Islam in Africa, and the challenges of urbanization in developing countries. This course will be conducted in English. Students will complete and present independent research during winter term.
Units: 3.

GLST 295: Nationalism in Modern History

An examination of the idea and the reality of nationalism in modern history. Among the questions we will ask are: Is nationalism a modern phenomenon, or does it have pre-modern origins? Is it compatible with democracy and human rights or fundamentally hostile to them? Is it primarily a European phenomenon transplanted to other places, or are there indigenous roots of nationalism throughout the world? We will attempt to answer these questions by reading theoretical works on nationalism from a variety of disciplines and by examining historical case studies. (G&C)
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 223, History 295
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

GLST 303: Introduction to Francophone Literary Studies

This course aims at introducing students to the nature and role of literature in the francophone world. Selected pieces from various literary genres (folk tales, poetry, drama, and novels) by writers such as Césaire, Senghor, Diop, Bâ, Jalloun, Kateb, and Memmi will be read. Themes will include colonialism, resistance, and identity formation.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 303
Prerequisite: FREN 202 or consent of instructor

GLST 308: Half the Sky: Chinese Women's History

This course examines important questions about the lives of women in the last thousand years of Chinese history. Through an exploration of primary sources in translation, classic works of fiction, film, memoirs, and oral histories, we will address theoretical questions fundamental to both women’s studies and Chinese history. (G & C)
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 308, History 308
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

GLST 315: Empire and Nation in Russian History

The course examines the history of ethnically diverse territories referred to as “Russia” from early modern times to 1991. Themes include the formation of the Russian empire, its transformation into the Soviet Union, and its partial collapse in 1991; the meaning of “empire,” “nation,” and “ethnicity” in historical context; and the interaction of Russians with non-Russian peoples in Ukraine, the Baltic States, Central Asia, and the Caucasus. (G&C)
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 315, Ethnic Studies 320
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor; HIST 320 or 325 recommended

GLST 330: Introduction to Film

An introduction to the critical analysis of Latin American and Spanish film. Students will study a series of films and pertinent readings through class discussions, different types of assignments, and presentations. The course is organized around the central topic of the relationship between audiovisual representation and power. Students will explore different ways in which Latin American and Spanish cinema has portrayed hegemonic and non-hegemonic identities along lines of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic status. Class taught in Spanish. Units: 6.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 330
Prerequisite: SPAN 202, its equivalent, or official placement and consent of instructor. Students who successfully completed SPAN 430 cannot register for GLST 330.

GLST 340: International Politics

An analysis of patterns of interactions of state and non-state actors in a system without supreme authority, focusing on alternative theoretical frameworks rather than substantive problems. Special emphasis on “realist” and “liberal” theories; the nature and uses of power in international politics; and issues of security, including conventional war, weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, environmental decay, and migration.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 340
Prerequisite: GOVT 110 or 140 or sophomore standing

GLST 352: Colonialism and Global Structures

An overview of European colonialism in Africa and Asia, this course focuses on colonial ideologies in the 19th and 20th centuries. It will investigate the myths and realities of colonialism and compare the colonial practices of the Belgians, Dutch, English and French. Our analysis will be informed by essays written by leading colonial theorists, novels and films. Lecture/discussion with response essays and a final project.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 352
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

GLST 355: The Holocaust in German Culture (in English)

This course focuses on literary responses to the Holocaust, but it also deals with film and the issue of commemoration. After a discussion of the difficulty of representing the Holocaust, the course examines the Holocaust’s role in the construction of German-Jewish identity and its impact on post-war German culture. Taught in English. German majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in German.
Units: 6.
Also listed as German 355, History 311
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

GLST 361: Western Encounters with China: Perceptions and Misperceptions

This course examines Western encounters with China. Students will analyze and assess Western perceptions and misperceptions of China through a variety of primary sources in translation and relevant secondary studies. (G & C or E)
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 361, East Asian Studies 361
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

GLST 365: International Law

A study of the role of law in international politics. Attention to the distinctive nature of the international legal system and to the relevance of international law to the control of violence, promotion of peace, protection of human rights, and management of resources. Current problems and the outlook for the future world order are assessed.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 365
Prerequisite: GOVT 110 or GOVT 140 or sophomore standing

GLST 378: Black Europe: Resistance, Performance, & Self-Making (in English)

This course dispels racial myths of the European continent, introduces the Black Diaspora beyond the African American context, pushes the boundaries of belonging and national identity in Europe, and presents black individuals/collectives as historical agents and transnational actors on and beyond the continent. Course materials may consist of literature, poetry, music videos, film, and art. Assessments include short reflection papers, research papers, and oral presentations. Taught in English. German majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in German.
Units: 6.
Also listed as German 378, Ethnic Studies 378

GLST 389: Berlin: Experiencing a Great City

An introduction to one of the world's great cities. Classwork includes the history, culture and literature of Berlin and preparations for day-long walking tours that students will lead. Students will do some readings and discussions in German and write their comparative paper in German Students must completed both the classroom portion of the course and the Berlin trip to receive credit. Taught in English. Not open to students who have previously received credit for GER 290.
Units: 2 OR 6.
Also listed as German 389
Prerequisite: GER 312

GLST 390: Tutorial in Global Studies

A tutorial is a primarily student-driven course of study undertaken by an individual student or small group of students in collaboration with one or more faculty members. The primary goal of a tutorial is expansion, refinement, and synthesis of knowledge and abilities through in-depth exploration of a specific topic.
Units: 1 TO 98.

GLST 391: Directed Study in Global Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.

GLST 392: The African and Black American Experience

This comparative literature course examines the representations of the African and Black American experience in literature. It explores how their subaltern status on the continent and the US has been instrumental in shaping the spirit of resistance that subtend the works of writers from both literary traditions. We will examine the thematic intersections between these literatures and analyse how writers deal with colonialism, slavery, race, ethnicity, the question of belonging and humanism. This course will only count for French major/minor units with an accompanying 3 unit tutorial in French arranged with instructor.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 392, Ethnic Studies 392
Prerequisite: Non for non-majors or minors in French & Francophone Studies For majors or minors in French & Francophone Studies: one 300-level French course or instructor's consent. This course will only count for French major/minor units with an accompanying 3 unit tutorial in French arranged with instructor.

GLST 399: Independent Study in Global Studies

Independent study is an opportunity to go beyond the established curriculum and undertake largely student-directed work that in most disciplines is expected to result in the generation of new scholarship or the creation of a new work or performance.
Units: 1 TO 98.

GLST 401: Field Experience in Development

Students engaged in this course will have the opportunity to do field research in a developing country. Each student will develop and implement a project that concerns a political, economic, social, or environmental issues that is important in the country visited. Past Field Experiences have taken place in Sierra Leone, Ghana, Jamaica, and Morocco. Students will also have the opportunity to learn from both national and local leaders in the country of research, and to participate in community engaged learning through volunteer activities. Class members will actually travel during either winter or spring break. Students should register for GOVT 401 in the term prior to the planned travel. They should also register in the subsequent term, when they will present their research to the wider Lawrence community. [ Note: two terms of GOVT 401 are considered the equivalent of a six unit 400-level GOVT course].

Location for 2021-22: Students will travel to a TBA location during spring break (March 2022).. Admission is by application to Prof. Skran. Students should register for both winter and spring terms 2022.

Planned Location for 2022-23 To be determined
Units: 3.
Also listed as Government 401, Economics 206, Environmental Studies 311
Prerequisite: ENST 300, GOVT 248, GOVT 500 and RLST 240

GLST 402: Senegalese Culture

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks. Offered in alternate years.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 400, Anthropology 450
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

GLST 403: Senegalese Literature and History

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks. Offered in alternate years.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 401
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

GLST 404: Senegalese Music

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks.
Units: 3.
Also listed as French 404, Music Repertoire-Perf Study 405
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

GLST 420: Advanced Topics in Global Studies

An advanced discussion-focused course with a rotating topic determined by faculty in the global studies program. Topics will be wide-ranging, but will include a global perspective and contribute to one of the four global studies thematic tracks (human security, global cities, nations and identities, or arts and exchange). May be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.

GLST 421: Defining Frenchness

This course examines the French national self-image over the centuries, including the creation of a national historical narrative. We will also consider how defining the non-French, the foreigner, and especially the immigrant helps to reify national self-image.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 420
Prerequisite: One 300-level French course or consent of instructor

GLST 425: Topics in International Security

This course is an exploration of the politics of international security. The specific topic will vary by term, but the concepts to be covered include bargaining, diplomacy, conflict and cooperation.

Topic for
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 425
Prerequisite: GOVT 140 or GOVT 340 or consent of instructor

GLST 446: TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

This course will address an advanced topic in the sub-field of Comparative Politics, such as democracy and authoritarianism, politics of the city, political participation and social movements, gender and politics, or the comparative method.

Topic for
This course
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 446
Prerequisite: GOVT 215, or GOVT 245, or consent of instructor.

GLST 470: Topics in Ethnomusicology - Regions

An examination of music of a particular geographic region or diasporic group. Topics and prerequisites may vary from year to year. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Fall 2021: Music of the Middle East
This course will introduce the main aspects of Arab, Turkish, and Persian art, folk, and popular music. Students will become familiar with Middle Eastern tuning systems, rhythmic patterns, formal structures, and performance practices. We will also look at the role of music in society in these regions as well as among diasporic populations, and explore connections of music to other areas of social, religious, and political life.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Musicology 470
Prerequisite: MUCO 212 or MUCO 202 or consent of instructor

GLST 471: Performing Arts of Bali

This course explores the intersections of Balinese music, dance, drama, and ritural. Discussions will include how globalization, tourism, and economic and religious tensions affect the arts and performer’s lives. Students will have hands-on experience learning to play Balinese gamelan instruments.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Musicology 471, Ethnic Studies 471
Prerequisite: MUCO 212 or MUCO 202 or consent of instructor.

GLST 492: Music and Globalization

How do forces of globalization affect musicians and music-making? How do people use music to make sense of their transnational and cross-border lives and identities? What happens to the meanings in music when it travels across borders and boundaries, is performed by new musicians in different contexts, and is heard by new listeners? What happens to local or ritual meanings when it becomes commodified and commercialized? Do international copyright laws adequately protect composers and musicians when their music travels, and what about when such laws are at odds with local notions of creation and ownership? This course explores answers to these questions through case studies on a variety of musical genres and places around the world.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Musicology 492
Prerequisite: MUCO 212 or GLST 100

GLST 494: Music and the Environment

In many societies around the world, people use music and specialized listening skills to connect with nature, specific places, and surrounding environments. This course will explore music performance practices that express or enact these connections. Course materials will draw on ethnographic case studies and the growing fields of ecomusicology, acoustic ecology, and zoomusicology.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Musicology 494, Environmental Studies 494
Prerequisite: MUCO 212 or MUCO 202 or ENST 127 or consent of instructor

GLST 516: Literature & Human Rights

An interdisciplinary investigation of the aesthetics and ethics of representing human rights and their violations in literature and film. Texts include novels, plays, essays, and films on topics such as genocide, torture, and development.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 516, Ethnic Studies 516
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 280, or consent of instructor

GLST 518: Narratives of Inequality

Why is there so much inequality in the world? We will explore several answers to this question, focusing on economic inequality specifically. We will analyze novels and films about economic inequality and efforts to right them at home and abroad.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 518, Ethnic Studies 518
Prerequisite: ENG 280, junior standing, or consent of instructor

GLST 590: Tutorial in Global Studies

A tutorial is a primarily student-driven course of study undertaken by an individual student or small group of students in collaboration with one or more faculty members. The primary goal of a tutorial is expansion, refinement, and synthesis of knowledge and abilities through in-depth exploration of a specific topic.
Units: 1 TO 98.

GLST 591: Directed Study in Global Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.

GLST 599: Independent Study in Global Studies

Independent study is an opportunity to go beyond the established curriculum and undertake largely student-directed work that in most disciplines is expected to result in the generation of new scholarship or the creation of a new work or performance.
Units: 1 TO 98.

GLST 690: Tutorial in Global Studies

A tutorial is a primarily student-driven course of study undertaken by an individual student or small group of students in collaboration with one or more faculty members. The primary goal of a tutorial is expansion, refinement, and synthesis of knowledge and abilities through in-depth exploration of a specific topic.
Units: 1 TO 98.

GLST 691: Directed Study in Global Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.

GLST 699: Independent Study in Global Studies

Independent study is an opportunity to go beyond the established curriculum and undertake largely student-directed work that in most disciplines is expected to result in the generation of new scholarship or the creation of a new work or performance.
Units: 1 TO 98.