Please note: The course descriptions displayed here are current as of Wednesday, September 2, 2015, but the official Course Catalog should be used for all official planning.

FIST 100
Introduction to Film Studies

This course provides students with a basic introduction to the vocabulary of film studies and an overview of historical, analytical, and theoretical approaches to film. Students will begin to develop the critical means for engaging with the filmic medium in discussion and writing. These aims will be met through a diverse selection of films rooted in different cultures, times, and ideologies. Units: 6.

FIST 110
Interdisciplinary Video

Designed primarily for students interested in incorporating video into their current or future work in other academic and creative disciplines. This course offers a practical introduction to basic editing, camera, and sound techniques, paired with a general study of multiple methodologies and current debates in representational ethics. Units: 6.

FIST 120
Image and Sound I

A basic introduction to the fundamental forms, concepts, terminology, and techniques of filmmaking, contextualized within a critical/historical framework. Students explore multiple approaches to creating meaning through readings, screenings, lectures, discussions, and critiques, paired with video exercises and hands-on instruction. Units: 6.

FIST 191
Directed Study in Film Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work. Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 210
Film History I

A foundation course on the history of cinema in a global and transnational context, Film History I focuses on "silent" film (early film to the present day) and the transition to sound. Topics include creative and technological practices; national cinemas in context; narrative, documentary, and experimental modes. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 211
Film History II

A foundations course on the history of cinema in a global and transnational context, Film History II focuses on the sound era. Topics include creative and technological practices; studio, avant-garde, and postcolonial cinemas; independent, contemporary, and digital film; narrative, documentary, and experimental modes. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 220
Image and Sound II

A continuation of FIST 120 with expanded instruction in image design, sound design, sequencing, and concept development. Historical development of the medium and contemporary approaches to creative expression, representational ethics, and audience are emphasized through exercises, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and critiques, culminating in a final video project. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 120 or consent of instructor

FIST 222
Sound Design

An introduction to film sound studies paired with hands-on exploration of cinematic audio recording and editing techniques, with emphasis on sound/image relationships and the use of sound to create meaning. Students will engage in close readings of critical and theoretical texts, view and discuss film screenings, and produce a series of short audio and video exercises, culminating in a final video project showcasing the creative use of film sound. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 120 or consent of instructor

FIST 240
New Media in Art

An introduction to the digital medium within a fine art context. Digital photography, experimental video, sound, photo book design, and blogging are covered as students use the Internet as a venue for projects. The evolution of technology, new media theory, contemporary art discourse, and visual culture are examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations. Units: 6. Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110
Also listed as Studio Art 240

FIST 245
Interarts: New Media Projects

Digital media are used to explore the relationship between art and knowledge. Lectures, discussions, readings, and critiques will investigate contemporary art practices and interdisciplinarity. Conceptual-development, planning and production will be covered as students work individually or collaboratively on video, performance, installation, and web projects. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations. Units: 6. Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110, or consent of instructor
Also listed as Studio Art 245

FIST 260
The Art of Film

A study of the narrative and visual techniques in films selected from masterpieces of modern cinema. Readings in film history, film theory, and film aesthetics along with viewings of approximately ten movies from various periods and countries, by directors such as Eisenstein, Wells, Fellini, Kurasawa, and Truffaut. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

FIST 270
Post-Soviet Film (in English)

This course will focus on the works of seminal filmakers in the post-Soviet period. Through the prism of post-Soviet films students will be introduced to contemporary Russian culture and to the issues explored within these cinematic narratives: national identity, gender relations, role of the arts in a post-Soviet society, and the re-examination of Russia's historical and cultural past. Taught in English. Units: 6.
Also listed as Russian 270

FIST 277
Introduction to German Film Studies

With its pivotal role in the inauguration of the cinema, knowledge of German film is critical to any understanding of the history of film. This course is intended to be an introduction both to German cinema and to the discipline of film studies. Considered perhaps as one of the most accessible aesthetic forms, the moving image pervades our everyday lives and yet we seldom think of what we do in the movie theatre as “reading.” Throughout this course, students will be introduced to the practice of reading the filmic text using three structuring lenses: 1) history, 2) formal and generic elements, and 3) film criticism. Units: 6. Prerequisite: GER 312
Also listed as German 377

FIST 287
Russian Through Film

This course will examine topics in Russian film. Topics may include specific generes (e.g. the sad comedy), the work of a director or tradition, films important for a specific historical moment (e.g. the Thaw or World War Two), or films devoted to a specific theme. Students will expand their Russian vocabulary, improve fluency, increase speaking confidence and gain cultural knowledge by viewing Russian films and analyzing the psychology of the characters. Throughout this course, students will be introduced to the practice of reading the filmic text using three structuring lenses: 1) history, 2) formal and generic elements, and 3) film criticism. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Winter 2016: The Soviet Fairy Tale
This course will introduce advanced students of Russian to the rich tradition of Soviet fairy-tale films, while developing students’ listening, speaking, writing, and reading proficiency. In the first half of the course, we will watch movies based on traditional Russian fairy-tales and learn about such favorite characters as Baba-Yaga, Kashchei the Deathless, Vasilissa the Beautiful, etc. In the second half of the course, we will discuss films based on fairy tales written by Soviet authors and consider the reasons for this genre’s popularity during that time period. Units: 6. Prerequisite: RUSS 250 or consent of instructor
Also listed as Russian 287

FIST 300
Reel Men: Masculinity in American Film, 1945-2000

Focusing on an array of well-known American films — “The Maltese Falcon,” “Red River,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “McCabe and Mrs. Miller,” “Chinatown,” “Die Hard,” and “American Beauty” among them — the course will integrate film theory, gender theory, and American history to address the problem of how masculinity has been constructed in American culture since World War II. Not open to students who have previously received, or need to receive, credit for HIST 400. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Sophomore level or above
Also listed as History 300, Gender Studies 323

FIST 302
Cinematically Speaking

French films function as a springboard for readings, discussions, oral presentations, and short critical essays. We will briefly examine the history of French film from 1940 to the present, study cinematic techniques, the vocabulary of cinema, and explore the principal themes. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FREN 202 or consent of instructor
Also listed as French 302

FIST 305
Film as History and History as Film

An examination, through selected films, of specific moments in European history and an examination of film itself as a source of historical interpretation. Possible “historical moments” include Medieval England, Nazi Germany, and the Holocaust, and possible films include Becket, The Triumph of the Will, and Schindler’s List. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor
Also listed as History 305

FIST 309
Hollywood Goes to High School

Year after year, Hollywood turns out movies that are set in schools and present images of teachers and teens. Many of these films address typical coming-of-age issues, societal fear of teen crime and delinquency and, of course, the search for romance. A subset of these films provide powerful and culturally enduring images of teachers and teaching. High school movies also provide ingisht into the fantasies, anxieties, dreams, and assumptions prevalent in American culture. This course will examine the world and worldview found in Hollywood high school movies and the extent to which the stories they tell make us who we are. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Also listed as Education Studies 309

FIST 318
Topics in Filmmaking

This course allows for an in-depth examination of various aspects of filmmaking, with a dual focus on close reading of related film studies texts and practical exploration of advanced techniques, culminating in a final video project.

Topic for Spring 2016: Artisanal Animation
An exploration of the history and contemporary practice of artisanal and experimental animation through film and video projects, readings, screenings, discussion, and critique. Students will create a series of short exercises experimenting with stop-motion object, pixilation, paint-on-glass, silhouette, cutout, erasure, 2D computer animation, and/or direct 16mm animation techniques, and complete a culminating short animation project. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Familiarity with video editing software or consent of instructor

FIST 319
Principles of Editing

A theoretical and practical introduction to connecting images and sound in a compelling way. The goal is to promote understanding of film, video, and new media as tools for creative expression and to help students think critically and make informed choices about editing. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 320
Topics in Russian Film (in English)

This course explores facets of the development of Russian film in its historical and cultural context. Topics may include: “The Golden Age of Soviet Film,” “The Cinema of Tarkovsky,” and “Film as Propaganda.” Taught in English. Russian majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in Russian.

Topic for Spring 2016: The Golden Age of Silent Film
Units: 6.
Also listed as Russian 320

FIST 324
Gender and Cinema

This course examines gender and film in an international context. Topics include the construction of femininity and masculinity in film, feminist and queer film theories, analysis of film using intersectional and formal approaches, women behind the camera, and gender and genre. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 100, GEST 100, the equivalent, or consent of instructor
Also listed as Gender Studies 324

FIST 325
Black, Brown, and Queer on Film: Race, Gender, and Sexuality on Film

Visual culture has long defined that which is not white, not queer, and not male as deviant from the visual norm. This course will explore the way in which film culture has traditionally positioned people it defines as deviant fom the racial, ethnic, gender or sexual norm and the ways in which filmmakers have responded to that positioning. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 425, Gender Studies 325

FIST 330
Introduction to Film

An introduction to the critical analysis of Latin American and Spanish film. Selected films represent various countries, genres and directors from Latin America and Spain. Readings of relevant film theory, class discussions and composition tasks prepare students for other advances courses in the Spanish program. Units: 6. Prerequisite: SPAN 202, its equivalent, or consent of instructor; not open to native speakers of Spanish.
Also listed as Spanish 430, Theatre Arts 352

FIST 340
Intermediate New Media in Art

A continuation of Art 240 or 245 using the digital medium within a contemporary art context. Digital photography, experimental video, social media, performance, and installation are covered while using the Internet and campus spaces as venues for projects. Contemporary art discourse is examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations. Units: 6. Prerequisite: ART 240 or ART 245
Also listed as Studio Art 340

FIST 345
Screenwriting

An exploration of the plot, character, and theme in the work of short films and scripts followed by the creation of one or more short screenplays. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 350
Modern Chinese Literature and Cinema in Translation

A survey of 20th-century Chinese fiction and cinema. Iconoclastic works of modern Chinese vernacular fiction from 1919 through the post-Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) will be juxtaposed alongside films dealing with the same period, such as Red Sorghum (1987) and Farewell, My Concubine (1992) made by the so-called Fifth Generation of film directors (born after 1949, when the People’s Republic was founded). Class conducted in English. No knowledge of Chinese required. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; EAST 150 recommended
Also listed as East Asian Studies 350, Chinese and Japanese 350

FIST 352
The Film Music Score in the Holywood Studio System

Intermediate studies in music analysis, focusing on a particular analytic technique, critical approach, or repertory, such as text/music relations, Renaissance counterpoint, music and film, and non-western music. Topics vary from year to year. Course may be repeated with consent of instructor. Topic for Spring 2012: The Film Music Score in the Hollywood Studio System
This course will examine the development of the dramatic film score produced by the major Hollywood film studios from 1928 to 1959. Through aural and written analysis of selected film scores, as well as engagement with primary and secondary source readings, the course will explore the changing role of musical underscore in its formative years. Films to be studied include /Anthony Adverse/ (1936), /The Maltese Falcon/ (1941), and /The Best Years of Our Lives/ (1946). Units: 6. Prerequisite: MUTH 301

FIST 354
History of Russian and Soviet Film

This course will introduce the student to the rich and varied tradition of Russian and Soviet cinema from the Pre-Revolutionary period to the present. Works by major filmmakers will be viewed and discussed in the context of the culture, economy, society, and politics of the time. Taught in English. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Also listed as History 354, Russian 354

FIST 357
Film in Germany (In English)

This course selects from 90 years of filmmaking in Germany. Films range from expressionism to Nazi propaganda and from escapist comedies to avant garde art. Learning to “read” German films critically also means finding out how to understand movies from Hollywood and beyond. Possible topics include “From Caligari to Hitler,” “German Literature as Film,” and “What Makes Lola Run.” Taught in English. German majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in German. Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 351, German 357

FIST 360
Chinese Contemporary Film in English

Using feature films and documentaries from the so-called Fifth [1982-] and Sixth Generations [beginning in the 1990s] of film directors in China, this course provides a visual record of the immense political, economic, and social changes in China since the Reform and Opening up period at the end of the Cultural Revolution. Taught in English. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; EAST 150 or EAST 420 recommended
Also listed as East Asian Studies 360, Chinese and Japanese 360

FIST 362
Vampires, Monsters, and Man-Eaters

This course examines the borders of the human through the figures of the vampire, monster, and femme fatale in literature, film, and the visual arts. Featured in the works of canonized authors as well as within popular culture, “monstrousness” can provide valuable insights into numerous aspects of German history and psychosexual relations. Possible texts include the early vampire film Nosferatu, Wedekind’s Lulu tragedies, Patrick Süskind’s Das Parfüm, and paintings by H.R. Giger. Units: 6. Prerequisite: GER 312
Also listed as Gender Studies 362, German 462

FIST 370
Avant-Doc

An exploration of personal, experimental, and emerging approaches to documentary filmmaking through video projects, readings, screenings, lecture, discussion, and critique. This course examines both contemporary practice and historical intersections among filmmaking traditions, with a focus on engaging with critical dialogues and diverse ways of articulating relationships between maker, subject, and audience. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Familiarity with editing software or consent of instructor

FIST 371
Documentary Forms

This course presents a broad overview of contemporary and historical documentary filmmaking practice through readings, screenings, discussion, and short video projects. Students will engagae with critical dialogues and explore several distinct approaches to documentary production, including rhetorical, observational, participatory, and reflexive forms, culminating in a completed short documentary. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 120 or consent of instructor

FIST 390
Tutorial in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 391
Directed Study in Film Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work. Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 399
Independent Study in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 400
Reel Men: Masculinity in American FIlm, 1945-2000

At the upper level, the course will serve as a history seminar in preparation for the history department's capstone course. Those taking it at that level will be required to write at least one paper addressing film or gender theory and to write a 10-15 page research prospectus. Not open to students who have previously received credit for HIST 300. Units: 6. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above
Also listed as History 400, Gender Studies 423

FIST 402
Film Theory and Criticism

What is the language of film? What is the relationship between spectator and screen? What is the role of film as mass and global phenomena? This course explores basic issues in film theory and criticism that may include auteur theory, genre criticism, apparatus theory, stardom, feminist and queer film theories. Units: 6. Prerequisite: One of FIST 100, FREN 302, FREN 411, GER 177, GER 277, GER 357, GER 411, or SPAN 330; or consent of instructor

FIST 411
Fascism and Film

This course in French may be taken in conjunction with GER 411, taught in English. It will expand on the films made in France by Continental under the Nazi Occupation, 1940-1944. Concurrent registration in GER 411 is required. Units: 2. Prerequisite: One course in French at the 300 level or consent of instructor
Also listed as French 411

FIST 412
Fascism and Film (In English)

This course lets students examine films that were ostensibly made as entertainment or explicitly crafted as propaganda in the historical context of Nazi Germany and occupied France. Aside from learning how governments and their cinematic agents used this relatively new medium to shape public opinion (in support of the war, against Jews, etc.) students will see where and how resistance was possible. Units: 6.
Also listed as German 411

FIST 418
Topics in Film Studies

Topics in Film Studies allows for an in depth examination of topics across time, for example, the work of women directors, or it permits a detailed analysis of special topics, for example, Turkish-German or Central European film.

Topic for Fall 2015: Body Genres
The term “body genre” has come to signify films that not only centralize the body thematically but also engage the body of the spectator in the experience of the film through laughter, involuntary muscle reflexes of joy or fear, or erotic arousal. Developed by Carol J. Clover and Linda Williams in relationship to horror and pornographic film, the idea of body genres has been extended to include action film, musicals, comedy, and melodrama. Similarly, Tom Gunning speaks of the power of early cinema to “show” rather than “tell” through images and movement that shocked rather than through cinematic narrativization. This course will examine the power of film to configure the body on screen to provoke a reaction from the viewer as well as societal reactions to that cinematic power.

Topic for Spring 2015: The Aesthetic of Resistance in African American Cinema
Cinema culture has provided one of the major forums for negotiating African American inclusion within the larger American body politic. D. W. Griffith's 1915 film Birth of a Nation, which celebrated the Klu Klux Klan and is widely considered to be the beginning of narrative cinema culture in the US, is also the beginning of an image culture that has often worked directly against the interests of African Americans. This class will explore the ways filmmakers have challenged dominant modes of racial representation and created a cinematic aesthetic of resistance to mainstream visual culture. Units: 6.

FIST 419
Korean Modern History through Literature and Film

Using fiction, feature films, and historical texts, this course provides an in-depth introduction to modern Korean history, from the end of the Chŏsun dynasty in 1910 to contemporary North and South Korea. Students will gain an understanding of Korea’s colonial experience, civil war, dictatorships, development, democratization, and gender politics. Units: 6. Prerequisite: EAST 150 or consent of instructor
Also listed as East Asian Studies 418

FIST 420
Topics in Film Genre

This topics course allows for an in-depth examination of film genre in various historical, national, theoretical, and aesthetic contexts. Course under this heading may focus on a single genre (for example, the musical) or be comparative. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Winter 2015: Film Rules--The Powers and Perils of Genres
Each genre—sci-fi adventure, documentary, noir, romantic comedy, the western—takes its shape and creates its pleasure by observing a unique set of rules, assumptions, and values. But following those rules can be as dangerous as breaking them. When does a formula flop? When does it become art? This course examines how genres pose not just economic but also cultural, artistic, and ethical challenges for producers, consumers, and scholars of film. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 422
Borrowed Music in the Movies

When a film uses a pre-existing piece of music (popular or classical), meanings multiply, both within and outside the film itself. This course will explore these meanings, focusing on the fluid and reciprocal relationship between film and the music it borrows. Units: 6. Prerequisite: MUHI 201 and MUHI 202
Also listed as Musicology 422

FIST 447
Migrants and German Culture

Despite a long-term refusal to open itself to immigration, Germany has become a nation of immigrants and asylum-seekers. The course focuses on how both literature and films, including works by and about minorities in Germany, have dealt with key cultural phenomena: multiculturalism, diversity, acculturation, assimilation, “majority culture,” and parallel societies. Units: 6. Prerequisite: GER 312 or consent of the instructor
Also listed as German 447, Ethnic Studies 382

FIST 460
Topics in Community-Engaged Film Production

This course will explore the role of documentary video in public life, the way in which new digital media are reshaping communities and civic engagement, and the potential of video as a creative medium of participatory democracy.

Topic for Winter 2016: The Civic Life Project
Civic Life Project at Lawrence uses the production of short video documentaries as a medium of democratic engagement. The course is a laboratory for community-based storytelling in which students work in teams on documentary projects with community partners. Units: 6. Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 464
Francophone Literature and Screen Adaptations

Focusing on the works of writers and filmmakers such as Sembene Ousmane, Joseph Zobel, Aimé Césaire, D.T. Niane, Dani Kouyate, Euzhan Palcy and Raoul Peck the course examines the interface between the literary and filmic media in raising consciousness about societal challenges, nationhood, power and identity. It also analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of each medium in accomplishing these objectives. Units: 6. Prerequisite: 300-level French course or consent of instructor
Also listed as French 464

FIST 470
American Indians on Film

The course examines the ways in which American Indians have been depicted on film. Ethnographic, documentary, and feature films are examined and compared to understand how film has shaped our image of American Indians. Units: 6. Prerequisite: ANTH 350 or consent of instructor
Also listed as Anthropology 470, Ethnic Studies 430

FIST 540
Advanced New Media in Art

A continuation of Art 340 using the digital medium at an advanced level. Digital photography, experimental video, social media, performance, and installation are covered while using the Internet and campus spaces as venues for projects. Contemporary art discourse is examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations. Units: 6. Prerequisite: ART 340 and consent of instructor
Also listed as Studio Art 540

FIST 580
Dis(re)membering the Nation: Contemporary Film & Fiction of Spain and Latin America

A thematic analysis of film and fiction produced in the late and post-dictatorial context of Spain and several Latin American countries. The course studies the cultural processes of historical memory, collective trauma, oblivion, and questioning of national narratives in selected works from the past four decades. Readings include Manuel Puig's Kiss of the Spider Woman, Ariel Dorfman's Death and the Maiden, and Carmen Martin Gaite's The Back Room, as well as films by Lucrecia Martel, Victor Erice, Pablo Larrain, and Guillermo del Toro, among others. Units: 6. Prerequisite: One 400-level course in Spanish or consent of instructor
Also listed as Spanish 580

FIST 590
Tutorial in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 591
Directed Study in Film Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work. Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 599
Independent Study in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 690
Tutorial in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 691
Directed Study in Film Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work. Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 699
Independent Study in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98. Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

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