September 25 – November 20

The Fall 2020 exhibitions will be open to the LU campus community by appointment only. Click here to to request a day and time to view the exhibitions.

 

Follow the links below to view online versions of all the Fall 2020 exhibitions.

 

Leech Gallery:

Tughra (calligraphic monogram) of Sultan Selim III
Tughra of Sultan Selim III
Shania Johnson ’22 curated this exhibition as part of her summer internship in the Wriston Art Galleries. Using Lawrence University’s collection of plaster casts of Islamic calligraphy and architectural elements, Ms. Johnson interrogates the privileged status of the original in the study of art and also explores the usual career of Turkish artist Tosun Bayrak.

 

 

 

 

Berenice Abbott, Tri-Boro Barber School, 264 Bowery, Manhattan (1935)
Berenice Abbott, Tri-Boro Barber School, 1935
Debuting on the Freshman Studies list in the Fall term, Berenice Abbott’s photograph Tri-Boro Barber School, 264 Bowery, Manhattan (1935) anchors this exhibition. The exhibition also provides historical context to the various visual arts programs of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), including the Federal Art Project, the Public Works of Art Project, and the Treasury Relief Art Project, through additional artworks by artists like Grant Wood, Thomas Hart Benton, John Sloan, Paul Cadmus, Mabel Dwight, and Wisconsin’s own Ruth Grotenrath and Schomer Lichtner.

 

 

Kohler Gallery:

Five mini-exhibitions featuring student research on Lawrence University collections

This set of exhibitions feature student research and curation on collections donated to Lawrence University by generous alumni and foundations:

 
Gold Aureus of Diocletian obverse
Gold Aureus of Diocletian, obverse

 

Rule of Four: Ten Coins from the Roman Tetrarchy, curated by McKinley Breen ’21

 

 

 

Richard Bosman, Phosphorescence, 1993

 

 

 

 

 

Hiroshige, Tsuchiyama Station: Rainfall at Mt. Suzuka
Hiroshige, Tsuchiyama Station: Rainfall at Mt. Suzuka

 

Hiroshige’s 53 Stations on the Tokaido series, curated by May Li ’21 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Adrian Piper, Let's Have a Talk, 1992
Adrian Piper, Let's Have a Talk, 1992

 

Seeing Art Now: Critical Issues in Contemporary Prints, curated by Professor Elizabeth Carlson’s winter 2020 ARHI 320 students
Featuring the Marshfield Clinic Collection and Kohler Foundation, Inc.


 

 

Eliana Whitehouse, red chalk drawing
Eliana Whitehouse, red chalk drawing
Drawing from the Collection, with artwork by studio art students Viviana Magaña ’21, Irma Vazquez Lara ’21, and Eliana Whitehouse ’21

January 15 – March 12

Leech & Hoffmaster Galleries: 

Crossing the Vertical Border: On the Central American Migrant Trail

Óscar Martínez, The Beast

Assistant Professor of Spanish Thelma Jiménez-Anglada organized this powerful exhibition in 2016 for the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago. It pairs documentary photographs taken by Edu Ponces and Toni Arnau with text from Óscar Martínez’s book The Beast: Riding the Rails and Dodging Narcos on the Migrant Trail.

 

 

 

 

Kohler Gallery:
On Belonging
Image from Reaching through 5 ½ yards, 8497 miles
In response to increasing racial polarity in the United States, artists Nirmal Raja and Lois Bielefeld have launched two collaborative projects exploring identity, place, and belonging. Raja moved to the United States 30 years ago and Bielefeld is a Milwaukee native. One project examines the role of costume and our visual understanding of race, the other questions the veracity of recorded history and our attempts to contend with it; together, they form the interactive, multimedia exhibition On Belonging.

April 1 – May 9

Leech Gallery: 

Title TBD: ARHI 244 Identity in American Art student-curated exhibition
Collier's, June 6, 1926 cover of magazine
Collier's, June 6, 1926
In addition to an excellent collection of historical drawings, Paul Jackson ’49 gave Lawrence a group of magazine covers, inserts, and ads from Collier’s, The Saturday Evening Post, Harper’s Weekly, and The Ladies’ Home Journal, among others, dating from the 1860s to the 1920s. The collection offers students an opportunity to research the visual culture of the U.S. in these transformational decades using the magazine materials as their primary sources. Students will think through issues of national identity, gender, class, and race while also learning about the history of graphic arts, fashion, leisure, humor, advertising, and intellectual culture
 
 
 
 
Hoffmaster Gallery:
Tom Jones, Little Did He Know, 2017
Tom Jones, Little Did He Know, 2017
In artist Tom Jones’s Remnants series, images re-appropriated from historical documents such as newspapers, etchings, and ledger drawings are engraved on glass and laid over photographs of patterned carpets and textiles taken at Indian casinos throughout the United States.
 
This exhibition will offer visitors a deeper exploration of the ways American Indians have been visually represented in historical popular culture and also raise crucial questions about these depictions of identity. The dialogue between the engraved images and the vibrantly colored photographs encourage reflection about events in U.S. history and the future for Indian communities with casino revenues.
 
Kohler Gallery:
Sharon Kerry-Harlan, Urban Chatter

Artist Sharon Kerry-Harlan lives in Milwaukee, WI and Hollywood, FL. She has exhibited internationally, at the Renwick Gallery, the American Craft Museum, the Harn Museum, and the Milwaukee Art Museum, among others. Her work in textiles and mixed media pairs the human figure, especially the face, with energetic patterns and colors drawn from African printed fabrics.

Sharon Kerry-Harlan, Urban Chatter

Sharon Kerry Harlan, Urban Chatter
Artist Statement: I use the human figure to make statements about the quick turnarounds that confront us both in life's mundane and unexpected circumstances. I am particularly intrigued by the human face - what it reveals to the world and what it disguises from the world.

May 28 - June 27

2021 Senior Art Show

An exhibition of selected works by Lawrence University’s senior studio art majors.

July 9 – August 22

Leech & Hoffmaster Galleries: 

Wriston Summer Exhibition Series: More from the Marshfield Clinic Collection

Arone Raymond Meeks
Arone Raymond Meeks, Contact, 1993

The Wriston Summer Exhibition Series is an annual summer exhibition in the Wriston Art Galleries intended to engage the Fox Valley community in a conversation about artworks, artists, and art collections of the Midwest. To date we have had successful exhibitions featuring artworks donated to Lawrence University by the Kohler Foundation, Inc. (Kenn Kwint, Joseph Friebert, Schomer Lichtner and Ruth Grotenrath) and those drawn primarily from our collection but supplemented with works from other Wisconsin museums and collections (Tom and Margaret Dietrich, Warrington Colescott).