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2020-2021 Course Catalog

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This catalog was created on Sunday, June 20, 2021.


English

Professor:D. McGlynn (chair terms I and II)
Associate professors:C. Barnes, G. Bond (chair term III) (on leave term(s) I), K. Hoffmann, L. Khor (on leave term(s) III), M. Range, T. Spurgin (Bonnie Glidden Buchanan Professor of English Literature) (on leave term(s) III)
Assistant professors:C. Kervin, C. Segrest

The English Department at Lawrence offers two tracks within the major: Creative Writing and English.

Creative Writing: English fosters opportunities for students to simultaneously study literature and participate in its artistic production. Students in the major learn, in both creative writing and literature courses, to interrogate the complexities of language, culture, aesthetics, identities, communities, and themselves. Students take creative writing classes in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry (with options to also work in scriptwriting and playwrighting) at every level of the major, have numerous opportunities to interact with nationally and internationally renowned writers, and to interact closely with their peers and professors. The major is capped off by an intimate Senior Experience seminar, in which they produce a lengthy work of poetry or creative prose and present it during a public reading.

Literature: English provides students opportunities to develop their skill at critical reading, writing, and analysis—skills that can be applied not only to "literary" texts but also to the texts and images produced by the cultures that surround us. Literature courses include analysis of British, American, African American, multi-ethnic, and postcolonial cultures.

Required for the major in English

The Lawrence University English department offers two tracks within the major, in either Creative Writing or Literature. 

Students on the Creative Writing: English track learn to interrogate through literary study, and reflect through literary production, the complexities of language, culture, aesthetics, identities, communities, and themselves. Students will be required to do substantial work in both poetry and prose (with options to also work in scriptwriting and playwrighting) while also studying literature through numerous critical and historical lenses. At the conclusion of the English major, students on the Creative Writing Track will complete the Senior Experience by producing a lengthy work of poetry or creative prose accompanied by a critical introduction and a public presentation of their work. 

Students on the Literature: English track develop skills at critical reading, writing, and analysis—skills that can be applied not only to "literary" texts but also to the texts and images produced by the cultures that surround us. Our mission is to impart the passion and skills necessary for our students to become effective communicators across a diverse and multicultural world. We engage our students in deep explorations of texts, ideas, writers, cultures, histories, and audiences and provide extensive opportunities for writing, interpreting, and creating. Literature courses include analysis of British, American, African-American, multiethnic, and postcolonial cultures, which students are encouraged to examine in interdisciplinary contexts in pursuit of a broad-based liberal-arts education.  

The Creative Writing: English track requires the following:

  1. Two introductory courses at the 100 or 200-level:
    1. ENG 110: Literature and War
    2. ENG 150: Literary Analysis (or the equivalent)
    3. ENG 230: British Writers
    4. ENG 240: British Writers II
    5. ENG 250: American Writers
    6. ENG 260: African American Writers
    7. ENG 280: Postcolonial Writers
    8. ENG 281: History of the Book in London
       
  2. ENG 180: Introduction to Creative Writing
     
  3. Two 300-level creative writing courses, one in prose (fiction or nonfiction) and one in poetry:
    1. ENG 350: Creative Writing: Nonfiction
    2. ENG 360: Creative Writing: Fiction
    3. ENG 370: Creative Writing: Poetry
       
  4. Two 500-level creative writing courses in any genre. (Students may also petition for THAR 427: Playwrighting to count in place of one of these courses.):
    1. ENG 550: Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction
    2. ENG 560: Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
    3. ENG 562: Novel Writing
    4. ENG 565: Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry
    5. ENG 568: Poetry as Practice
       
  5. Two advanced courses focusing on period before 1800:
    1. ENG 401: Topics in Literary Criticism
    2. ENG 410: Newtonian Lit: Chronicles of a Clockwork Universe
    3. ENG 420: Studies in Medieval Literature
    4. ENG 425: Shakespeare (or ENG 170: Shakespeare in London, but not both)
    5. ENG 430: Renaissance Literature
    6. ENG 435: Renaissance Drama
    7. ENG 440: Milton and the 17th Century
    8. ENG 441: John Donne and the Metaphysical Poets
    9. ENG 443: New England Puritan Poetry
    10. ENG 445: Restoration and 18th-Century Comedy
    11. ENG 446: Gender and Enlightenment
    12. ENG 447: Eighteenth-Century Terrors
    13. ENG 448: Enlightenment Selves
    14. ENG 450: Eighteenth-Century Literature - no longer offered
    15. ENG 451: The Revolutionary Eighteenth Century
    16. ENG 452: Samuel Richardson's Clarissa
    17. ENG 470: Early American Writing - no longer offered
    18. ENG 527: History of the Book
       
  6. One advanced course focusing on the nineteenth century:
    1. ENG 402: Topics in Literary Criticism
    2. ENG 455: Romanticism
    3. ENG 460: The Victorian Age
    4. ENG 465: The English Novel
    5. ENG 474: American Poets of the Nineteenth Century
    6. ENG 476: Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers
    7. ENG 477: Dickinson
    8. ENG 478: Nineteenth-Century African-American Writers
       
  7. One advanced course focusing on the twentieth or twenty-first centuries:
    1. ENG 403: Topics in Literary Criticism
    2. ENG 480: Modernist British Fiction
    3. ENG 481: Joyce's Ulysses
    4. ENG 483: American Autobiography
    5. ENG 485: Modernist Poetry - no longer offered
    6. ENG 490: Modern Drama
    7. ENG 495: Modernist American Fiction - no longer offered
    8. ENG 498: Representing War in American Writing - no longer offered
    9. ENG 500: Contemporary American Fiction
    10. ENG 501: The Graphic Novel
    11. ENG 502: Contemporary Jewish-American Literature
    12. ENG 503: Contemporary American Poetry
    13. ENG 504: Multiethnic American Literature
    14. ENG 506: Contemporary African-American Women Poets
    15. ENG 510: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
    16. ENG 515: Gender and Modernist British/American Literature
    17. ENG 516: Literature and Human Rights
    18. ENG 517: Topics in Human Rights
    19. ENG 518: Narratives of Inequality
    20. ENG 521: Narratives of International News
    21. ENG 522: Literature and the Environment
       
  8. In completing the above requirements, students must take at least one course from each of the following literary and cultural traditions:
    1. British: ENG 170 (London Centre), 230, 240, 281, 410, 420, 425, 430, 435, 440, 441, 445, 446, 447, 448, 450, 451, 452, 455, 460, 465, 480, 481, 515, 527
    2. American: ENG 250, 260, 443, 470, 474, 476, 477, 478, 483, 485, 495, 498, 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 506, 510, 522
    3. African American: ENG 260, 478, 504, 506, 510; OR postcolonial: ENG 280, 517, 518, 521. A course in African-American literature may satisfy either category b or c but not both.
       
  9. ENG 601: Senior Seminar in Creative Writing
     

The Literature: English track requires the following:

  1. Three Introductory courses at the 100 or 200-level:
    1. ENG 110: Literature and War
    2. ENG 150: Literary Analysis (or the equivalent)
    3. ENG 230: British Writers
    4. ENG 240: British Writers II
    5. ENG 250: American Writers
    6. ENG 260: African American Writers
    7. ENG 280: Postcolonial Writers
    8. ENG 281: History of the Book in London
       
  2. Two advanced courses focusing on periods before 1800:
    1. ENG 401: Topics in Literary Criticism
    2. ENG 410: Newtonian Lit: Chronicles of a Clockwork Universe
    3. ENG 420: Studies in Medieval Literature
    4. ENG 425: Shakespeare (or ENG 170: Shakespeare in London, but not both)
    5. ENG 430: Renaissance Literature
    6. ENG 435: Renaissance Drama
    7. ENG 440: Milton and the 17th Century
    8. ENG 441: John Donne and the Metaphysical Poets
    9. ENG 443: New England Puritan Poetry
    10. ENG 445: Restoration and 18th-Century Comedy
    11. ENG 446: Gender and Enlightenment
    12. ENG 447: Eighteenth-Century Terrors
    13. ENG 448: Enlightenment Selves
    14. ENG 450: Eighteenth-Century Literature
    15. ENG 451: The Revolutionary Eighteenth Century
    16. ENG 452: Samuel Richardson's Clarissa
    17. ENG 470: Early American Writing
    18. ENG 527: History of the Book
       
  3. One advanced course focusing on the nineteenth century:
    1. ENG 402: Topics in Literary Criticism
    2. ENG 455: Romanticism
    3. ENG 460: The Victorian Age
    4. ENG 465: The English Novel
    5. ENG 474: American Poets of the Nineteenth Century
    6. ENG 476: Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers
    7. ENG 477: Dickinson
    8. ENG 478: Nineteenth-Century African-American Writers
       
  4. One advanced course focusing on the twentieth or twentieth-first centuries:
    1. ENG 403: Topics in Literary Criticism
    2. ENG 480: Modernist British Fiction
    3. ENG 481: Joyce's Ulysses
    4. ENG 483: American Autobiography
    5. ENG 485: Modernist Poetry - no longer offered
    6. ENG 490: Modern Drama
    7. ENG 495: Modernist American Fiction - no longer offered
    8. ENG 498: Representing War in American Writing - no longer offered
    9. ENG 500: Contemporary American Fiction
    10. ENG 501: The Graphic Novel
    11. ENG 502: Contemporary Jewish-American Literature
    12. ENG 503: Contemporary American Poetry
    13. ENG 504: Multiethnic American Literature
    14. ENG 506: Contemporary African-American Women Poets
    15. ENG 510: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
    16. ENG 515: Gender and Modernist British/American Literature
    17. ENG 516: Literature and Human Rights
    18. ENG 517: Topics in Human Rights
    19. ENG 518: Narratives of Inequality
    20. ENG 521: Narratives of International News
    21. ENG 522: Literature and the Environment
       
  5. In completing requirements 2, 3 & 4, one class must be English 401, 402, or 403: Topics in Literary Criticism
     
  6. Two additional courses in English
     
  7. One course, separate from requirements 1-6, focusing on Postcolonial and/or American writers of color
     
  8. At least one of the courses in 6-7 must be an advanced course (400 or 500-level)
     
  9. Senior Experience (ENG 600, honors project in English, or student teaching in English)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Experience in English

Students on the Creative Writing: English Track must take:

ENG 601: Senior Seminar in Creative Writing: A seminar involving analysis of theoretical, critical, literary, and practical (i.e., craft-related) readings at an advanced level in conjunction with students' writing of an original, substantial creative work, in either poetry or prose. Students working in different genres will have the opportunity to read one another’s work and discuss, as a group, both the challenges and possibilities associated with composing lengthy creative projects. Each section of the seminar will focus on a theme that can accommodate variety in students' individual research projects

Students on the Literature: English Track may fulfill Senior Experience through one of several options:

  1. ENG 600: Senior Seminar in English: a seminar involving analysis of theoretical, historical, critical, and literary readings at an advanced level in conjunction with students' research and writing of an original, substantial paper (taken during the senior year or, in some cases, during spring term of the junior year);
  2. An advanced course in creative writing with additional work determined by the instructor (taken during the junior or senior year); students should plan ahead so that they complete the necessary prerequisite for the advanced course in creative writing;
  3. Student teaching in English, along with a paper co-directed by the student's academic advisor in English and a faculty member in the education department; or
  4. An honors project in English (or adequate progress toward completing an honors project as approved by departmental petition); Students pursuing double majors or double degrees are encouraged to consult with faculty from the English department and the other major department prior to taking ENG 600 if they wish to undertake a research topic that draws upon both of their majors. Students pursuing double majors or double degrees also have the option of doing an honors project that is interdisciplinary in nature, as long as one of the directors of the project is a professor in the English department.

Required for the minor in English

  1. Two courses from the introductory and intermediate group:
    1. ENG 110: Literature and War
    2. ENG 150: Literary Analysis
    3. ENG 230: British Writers I
    4. ENG 240: British Writers II
    5. ENG 250: American Writers
    6. ENG 260: African American Writers
    7. ENG 280: Postcolonial Writers
    8. ENG 281: History of the Book in London
  2. One course focusing on periods before 1800:
    1. ENG 401: Topics in Literary Criticism
    2. ENG 410: Newtonian Lit: Chronicles of a Clockwork Universe
    3. ENG 420: Studies in Medieval Literature
    4. ENG 425: Shakespeare (or ENG 170: Shakespeare in London, but not both)
    5. ENG 430: Renaissance Literature
    6. ENG 435: Renaissance Drama - no longer offered
    7. ENG 440: Milton and the 17th Century
    8. ENG 441: John Donne and the Metaphysical Poets
    9. ENG 443: New England Puritan Poetry
    10. ENG 445: Restoration and 18th-Century Comedy
    11. ENG 446: Gender and Enlightenment
    12. ENG 447: Eighteenth-Century Terrors
    13. ENG 448: Enlightenment Selves
    14. ENG 450: Eighteenth-Century Literature - no longer offered
    15. ENG 451: The Revolutionary Eighteenth Century
    16. ENG 452: Samuel Richardson's Clarissa
    17. ENG 470: Early American Writing - no longer offered
    18. ENG 527: History of the Book
  3. One course focusing on the nineteenth century:
    1. ENG 402: Topics in Literary Criticism
    2. ENG 455: Romanticism
    3. ENG 460: The Victorian Age
    4. ENG 465: The English Novel
    5. ENG 474: American Poets of the Nineteenth Century
    6. ENG 476: Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers
    7. ENG 477: Dickinson
    8. ENG 478: Nineteenth-Century African-American Writers
  4. One course focusing on the twentieth or twenty-first centuries:
    1. ENG 403: Topics in Literary Criticism
    2. ENG 480: Modernist British Fiction
    3. ENG 481: Joyce's Ulysses
    4. ENG 483: American Autobiography
    5. ENG 485: Modernist Poetry - no longer offered
    6. ENG 490: Modern Drama
    7. ENG 495: Modernist American Fiction - no longer offered
    8. ENG 498: Representing War in American Writing - no longer offered
    9. ENG 500: Contemporary American Fiction
    10. ENG 501: The Graphic Novel
    11. ENG 502: Contemporary Jewish-American Literature
    12. ENG 503: Contemporary American Poetry
    13. ENG 504: Multiethnic American Literature
    14. ENG 506: Contemporary African-American Women Poets
    15. ENG 510: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
    16. ENG 515: Gender and Modernist British/American Literature
    17. ENG 516: Literature and Human Rights
    18. ENG 517: Topics in Human Rights
    19. ENG 518: Narratives of Inequality
    20. ENG 521: Narratives of International News
    21. ENG 522: Literature and the Environment
  5. One additional course in English

Required for the minor in creative writing

  1. Three courses in literary studies at any level in the English department (for English majors completing the creative writing minor, these can be courses from the major).
  2. Three courses in creative writing at any level, including work in at least two different literary genres. Courses in creative writing include:
    1. ENG 350: Creative Writing: Non-Fiction
    2. ENG 360: Creative Writing: Fiction
    3. ENG 370: Creative Writing: Poetry
    4. ENG 550: Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction
    5. ENG 560: Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
    6. ENG 562: Advanced Creative Writing: Novel Writing
    7. ENG 565: Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry
    8. ENG 568: Poetry as Practice
    9. THAR 427: Playwriting
    10. ENG 601: Senior Seminar in Creative Writing

Teacher certification in English language arts

Students who major in English can seek certification to teach English language arts at the secondary level. Students seeking certification must satisfactorily complete at least one course in writing (e.g., 150, 401 / 402 / 403, or a creative writing course), at least one course in linguistics (LING 150) or the English language, a tutorial in literature for adolescents, and a course in literature by writers of color in America (e.g., ENG 260, 506, or 510). Students can add an endorsement for a second area (such as English as a second language) by completing the appropriate minor. Students who plan to seek teacher certification should review the requirements in the Education section of the catalog and meet with the director of teacher education, preferably before the end of the sophomore year.

Teacher certification in English as a second language (K-12)

Students can seek certification to teach English as a second language at the elementary and secondary levels by completing the Teaching ESL minor in linguistics and other certification requirements. Interested students should review the requirements in the Education section of the catalog and meet with the director of teacher education, preferably before the end of the sophomore year.

Advanced placement

All students who have earned a 4 or better in the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Exam will be given credit for one course in English and will receive advanced placement in courses at the intermediate level (ENG 230, 240, 250); for majors, this credit will fulfill the requirement of ENG 150.

Students who earn a 4 or better in the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Exam will be given credit for one course at Lawrence, which will count toward graduation, but not toward the completion of the major.

Questions about exemption and placement should be addressed to the department chair. The application of AP credit towards the general education requirements for either the B.A. or the B.Mus. degrees will be determined by university policy. Please see the following link for more information about university credit for AP Examinations. AP Examination Information (PDF)

Departmental advisors

When students officially declare themselves English majors, they should choose a departmental advisor who will be responsible for guiding them in planning and completing their major course of study. Questions about the advising of English majors should be addressed to the department chair.

Graduate school

Students considering graduate work in English are advised to take classes with at least two different members of the department. They will likely want to do more English coursework than the minimum required for the major. Creative Writing students should take as many courses as possible in both creative writing and literature.

For Literature students considering pursuing the master's degree, be advised that most graduate schools require demonstrated proficiency in at least one modern language in addition to English. For the doctorate, the usual requirement is demonstrated proficiency in two modern languages. ENG 525: Contemporary Critical Theory is also an asset when preparing for graduate school. College work leading toward graduate study should be planned with these considerations in mind.


Courses - English

ENG 110: Literature and War

In this discussion-based course, we will grapple with language stretched to its absolute limit as we move through several centuries of writers attempting to describe war's indescribable violences, from the U.S. Civil War to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Assignments will include discussion leading, journal-keeping. 2-3 short papers, and a final exam.
Units: 6.

ENG 150: Reading Literature

An introduction to the techniques of literary analysis through the detailed study of individual texts.
Units: 6.

ENG 170: Shakespeare in London

Students will study several plays by William Shakespeare selected from among the current offerings by the Royal Shakespeare and other companies. Discussions will address the plays themselves, production techniques, and the audiences to whom they appeal. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 170
Prerequisite: Must be attending Lawrence London Centre

ENG 171: Literature of the Irish Troubles

The class includes poetry, short stories, novels, plays and film scripts which document the cultural and political conflict in Northern Ireland ("The Troubles"). Analysing literature from both sides of the conflict and from the Republic and Ulster, will allow for an in-depth understanding of the socio-historical context influencing these works, and the importance of literature as a personal and political voice.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 174
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

ENG 172: Modern Irish Drama

The class will read and discuss plays by contemporary Irish playwrights from Brendan Behan to Martin McDonagh. It will analyse personal and the political issues in modern day Ireland, the question of Irish identities and the gradual social changes since the beginning of the Troubles. Particular emphasis will be on the performance history of the plays, both in Ireland and abroad.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 172
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

ENG 180: Introduction to Creative Writing

A survey of prominent literary works through the lens of creative writing. Students will analyze works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry and will have the opportunity to respond creatively to the assigned readings-- i.e., by composing original stories, creative essays, and poems. Assigned texts will seek to expose students to various writing styles, and provide examples of the successes and strategies of other writers. In addition to learning various aspects of reading and discussing texts as writers, students will learn how to respond to writing in different genres.
Units: 6.

ENG 189: British and International Soccer Culture

A study of the myths, narratives, and cultural implications of the British and international football (soccer) industry, from its Victorian roots to its global present. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

ENG 191: Directed Study in English

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 203: Literary London

This course studies literature created in and about London, from Medieval poetry, short stories, journals to newspaper sequels and contemporary novels. We will walk in the footsteps of London-born writers and those who made London their home to find out how their writings have capture social, political, and cultural changes. A variety of assignments will allow students to engage individually with London. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Must be attending Lawrence London Centre

ENG 230: British Writers I

Intensive study of five or six major British authors from Chaucer to Swift. Emphasis on close reading and critical writing.
Units: 6.

ENG 240: British Writers II

Intensive study of five or six major British authors from Wordsworth to Yeats. Emphasis on close reading and critical writing.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or sophomore standing

ENG 245: The Long Novel

A comparative study of nineteenth century Europoean realism, with readings taken from a variety of national traditions. Authors studied may include Dickens, Flaubert, and Dostoevsky. Collaborative teaching of each text will expose participants to a wide range of critical and pedagogical methods. With instructor approval students may also register for an additional tutorial (3 units) in which we will read and discuss important theoretical works on the history of the novel form.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Russian 260
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ENG 250: American Writers

Intensive study of major American authors from Emerson to Hughes. Emphasis on close reading and critical writing.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or sophomore standing

ENG 260: African American Writers

A survey of African American literature from slave narratives through contemporary literature. Readings include works by Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, and Toni Morrison.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 360
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or sophomore standing

ENG 263: Greek and Roman Drama in Translation

In this course we analyze ancient plays both as great works of literature and as artifacts of a particular artistic, cultural, and political context. Students will read excerpts and complete plays in English from a variety of ancient authors, including (from Classical Athens) Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander, and (from late Republican and early Imperial Rome) Plautus, Terence, and Seneca.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 363, Classics 363
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 265: Greek and Roman Epic in Translation

An examination of ancient epic literature through the study of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid, all read in English translation. Emphasis on the important features and themes of the epic genre, ancient conceptions of the hero, and the literary, cultural, and political resonance of these texts in classical antiquity.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Classics 370
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 280: Postcolonial Writers

An introduction to major postcolonial works in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Readings include novels by African, Asian, and Caribbean authors such as Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, and Jean Rhys.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 280, Global Studies 280
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or consent of instructor

ENG 281: History of the Book in London

An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of the history of the book, focusing especially on London's role as a site of book production, distribution and consumption. We will work directly with manuscripts and rare books, studying the material history of books and writing techniques form early manuscripts to iPads. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 384
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

ENG 285: Biblical Narratives in Literature

An interdisciplinary exploration of the retelling of biblical narratives in modern literature. We will examine novels and poems that revisit biblical scenes, from the binding of Isaac to the crucifixion of Jesus, as independent literary works and in comparison to the biblical text and its retellings in early exegesis.
Units: 6.

ENG 350: Creative Writing: Non-Fiction

Practice in the writing of non-fictional prose.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 180. Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 360: Creative Writing: Fiction

Practice in the writing of short fiction.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 180. Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 370: Creative Writing: Poetry

Practice in the writing of poetry.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 180.

ENG 390: Tutorial Studies in English

Tutorial study in the literature of various periods, English and American, and in literary forms and composition. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. Arrangements should be discussed with the department chair.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 391: Directed Study in English

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 399: Independent Study in English

Advanced study, arranged in consultation with the department chair. Students considering an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 401: Topics in Literary Criticism

In this discussion-driven class, we will focus on a single early modern author or literary text in order to master the art of sophisticated literary criticism: crafting and organizing complex arguments, conducting scholarly research, and employing both primary and secondary sources effectively in literary analysis. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2021: Eliza Haywood
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Two 100- or 200- level courses in ENG or sophomore standing

ENG 402: Topics in Literary Criticism

In this discussion-driven class, we will focus on a single nineteenth-century author or literary text in order to master the art of sophisticated literary criticism: crafting and organizing complex arguments, conducting scholarly research, and employing both primary and secondary sources effectively in literary analysis. May be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Two 100- or 200- level courses in ENG or sophomore standing

ENG 403: Topics in Literary Criticism

In this discussion-driven class, we will focus on a single author or literary text from the 20th or 21st century in order to master the art of sophisticated literary criticism: crafting and organizing complex arguments, conducting scholarly research, and employing both primary and secondary sources effectively in literary analysis. May be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Two 100- or 200- level courses in ENG or sophomore standing

ENG 410: Newtonian Lit: Chronicles of a Clockwork Universe

Newtonian Lit is a course that investigates the connections between the literature and science of the Enlightenment, particularly with respect to contemporary notions of space and time. Students will analyze important texts from the fields of English and Physics, notably Laurence Sterne’s The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman and Isaac Newton’s Principia.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Physics 215
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent, plus any introductory course in the natural sciences (e.g., PHYS 141), plus sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 420: Studies in Medieval Literature

A study of Middle English literature and culture, focusing especially on the oral and performative dimensions of literature produced between 1300 and 1550.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 425: Shakespeare

An introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and their literary, historical, and theatrical context.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 432
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 430: Renaissance Literature

A selected study of poetry and prose in Sixteenth Century England. Readings will include Spenser's Faerie, Queene, and lyric poetry from Wyatt to Sidney.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 435: Renaissance Drama

A study of eight to ten plays from the early modern period, excluding Shakespeare. Readings include Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton and Webster.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 436
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 440: Milton and the 17th Century

A study of Donne and the metaphysical poets, the poetry and prose of Milton, and the poetry of Dryden. Emphasis on Milton.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 441: John Donne and the Metaphysical Poets

This lecture/discussion class will explore the rich historical, sexual, and religious tensions of 17th century British poet, courtier, and Anglican priest, John Donne. We will also explore the same tensions, manifested very differently, in the poetry of Donne's contemporary poet-priest, George Herbert. Students will write short weekly papers and a substantial final paper. In addition to Donne and Herbert, we will also read works by Sir Thomas Wyatt, Andrew Marvell, and others.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 250 or ENG 260, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 443: New England Puritan Poetry

A study of New England Puritan poetry in the context of new world spiritual aspirations and anxieties. Readings will include sections of Martin Luther's writings and Perry Miller's and others' criticism, as well as the poems of Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Michael Wiggelsworth, and other minor and post-Puritan poets.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 343
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ENG 445: Restoration and 18th-Century Comedy

In this discussion-driven course, we will consider issues of gender, sexuality, class, and performance in English comedies from 1660-1800. Students will complete regular informal writings, a group research project, a proposal, and a researched term paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 434
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 446: Gender and the Enlightenment

This course will examine writings by both men and women that reflect on the changing social roles for women in eighteenth-century Britain. Focusing on women's labor, reproduction, reading, and writing, the course will consider to what extent women could participate in the project of the Enlightenment.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 446
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 447: Eighteenth-Century Terrors

In this discussion course, we'll consider British poetry and prose of the eighteenth century specifically designed to frighten readers in order to uncover just what anxieties—cultural, racial, political—these texts are meant to awaken. Students will complete numerous short assignments, a group research project, and a researched term paper. Authors might include: Defoe, Walpole, Gray, Radcliffe, Austen.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 448: Enlightenment Selves

An interdisciplinary investigation of key concepts of identity and the emotions as understood during the Enlightenment. Students examine philosophical and literary texts to uncover how seventeenth and eighteenth century people conceived of their mental and emotional existence, and how these historical conceptions still influence contemporary theories of mind and self.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 448
Prerequisite: One course in either English or philosophy, or junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 451: The Revolutionary Eighteenth Century

Eighteenth-century Britain was bookended by revolutions of the political sort—the Glorious Revolution (1688) and the French Revolution (1789)—yet also rife with revolutions of the social sort: abolition, women's rights, libertinism, etc. We'll consider prose, poetry, and fiction from the period, paying particular attention to how they're imagining social and other forms of change. Regular short assignments, group research project, and researched term paper. May not be taken by students who have already earned credit for ENG 450.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 452: Samuel Richardson's Clarissa and the #metoo Eighteenth Century

Clarissa (1748) is one of the longest novels in English, and we're going to read every single beautiful word of it. Its sheer density and complexity mean that, as author Amy Gentry puts it, Richardson's messy #metoo tale "breaks and renews itself over thousands of pages." Required: short writings, short research presentation, critical synthesis.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or ENG 230, or consent of the instructor.

ENG 455: Romanticism

A study of the period from 1790 to 1830, focusing on the development and elaboration of what we now call Romanticism. Readings in the major authors of the period: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 460: The Victorian Age

A study of the period from 1830 to 1900, focusing on poetry, fiction, and critical prose. Readings range widely, including selections from Carlyle, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Rossettis, and Oscar Wilde.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 465: The English Novel

A study of English fiction from 1740 to 1900. Readings include novels by Richardson, Burney, Austen, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 467: Jane Austen and the History of the Novel

Intensive study of Austen's achievement and legacy. In additon to her six novels, readings will include books by earlier and later writers. these readings will help us to trace Austen's development as a writer and to consider her crucial place in literary history. Regular short assignments, brief oral reports, and a final examination.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 474: American Poets of the Nineteenth Century

This course will read across the spectrum of nineteenth-century American poetry, considering how and why writers turn to this versatile genre as their preferred mode of expression. Readings from Dickinson, Piatt, Melville, Whitman, Harper, Horton, Larcom, and others.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, an intermediate course in English, or consent of the instructor.

ENG 476: Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers

An exploration of 19th century women writers, including Sigourney, Harper, Stowe, Jacobs, Dickinson, Harding Davis, Chopin, Lazarus, Johnson, Zitlaka-sa and/or others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 476
Prerequisite: Junior standing, an intermediate course in English, or consent of instructor.

ENG 477: Dickinson

In this lecture/discussion course, we will grapple with the difficult poetry of Emily Dickinson, one of the greatest, and most mythologized, of American poets. Cutting through the myths of Dickinson, we will attempt to get to the truth of Dickinson by careful readings of her poetry and archival investigations of its historical and material contexts. Assignments will include short weekly papers, presentations, and a substantial final research project.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 477
Prerequisite: Junior standing or one course in English at the 200-level or above, or consent of instructor.

ENG 478: 19th C African-Amer Writers

This lecture/discussion class will explore the rich literature African-American authors created, against great adversity, in nineteenth-century America. We will read works by Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Charlotte Forten Grimke, Paul Laurence Dunbar and others. Students will write short weekly papers and a substantial final research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 478
Prerequisite: ENG 250, ENG 260, or junior standing; or consent of instructor

ENG 480: Modernist British Fiction

A study of selected works of British fiction in relation to early 20th-century thought. Authors include Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Mansfield, Forster, Woolf, and others.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 481: Joyce's Ulysses

An intensive study of Ulysses, covering the entire novel. Discussions will focus on Joyce's experiments with language and narration, his exploration of human psychology and sexuality, and (time permitting) his unique sense of humor. Seminar with short papers.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor

ENG 483: American Memoir

A study of prominent American autobiographies from the 19th and 20th centuries. The course will examine how autobiography responds to social, cultural, and aesthetic conditions and the relationship of the genre to the larger American literary tradition.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250, or consent of instructor

ENG 490: Modern Drama

Studies in some of the major playwrights in Europe, England, and America from the time of Ibsen to the present.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 440
Prerequisite: Junior standing, an intermediate course in English, or consent of instructor

ENG 500: Contemporary American Fiction

Examination of selected works of American fiction, with particular emphasis on the literary movements of the post-World War II era, including postmodernism, multiculturalism, regionalism, and other topics. The course will include a diverse array of readings, which will vary by term and topic, as well as selected films and theoretical texts.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250, or consent of instructor

ENG 501: The Graphic Novel

In recent years, graphic novels have taken a decidedly autobiographical turn as an increasing number of artists explore their own personal histories though a genre typically reserved for the fantastic and imagined. This course will examine a diverse array of contemporary graphic novels, ranging from popular comics to autobiography to experimental forms. Though the course will concentrate primarily on American graphic novels, it will include works produced by writer-artists in Asia, Western Europe, and elsewhere.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 250, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 502: Contemporary Jewish-American Literature

A survey of contemporary American-Jewish authors, as Phillip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, Paul Auster, Art Spiegelman, Jonathan Safran-Foer, and others, exploring the question of identity, gender, minor-literature, religion, immigration, and heritage. The course will also examine the two key components of these works -- Jewish and American -- and inquire into their validity.
Units: 6.

ENG 503: Contemporary American Poetry

Examination of selected works of American poetry with particular emphasis on the post-World War II era. The course will consider individual poets’ responses both to poetic traditions and to formal and thematic innovations of the 20th century.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250, or consent of instructor

ENG 504: Multiethnic American Literature

A study of selected works reflecting the ethnic and cultural diversity of American literature, with primary attention to minority voices and experiences. Selected texts will center on a specific theme such as hybridity, migration, or belonging. Works are taught in their literary, historical, and cultural context, critical readings will also be incorporated. Students will complete several short writing assignments and a researched term paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 504
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or the equivalent

ENG 506: Contemporary African-American Women Poets

In this lecture/discussion course, we'll look at the great stylistic variety of poetry that Black women have been writing during the past twenty years. Students will consider poetry through the lenses of critical race and gender criticism and will write weekly short papers and a substantial research paper. Poets may include Marilyn Nelson, Natasha Trethewey, Claudia Rankine, Tracy K. Smith, Nikky Finney and others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 506, Gender Studies 506
Prerequisite: ENG 250, ENG 260, or junior standing; or consent of instructor

ENG 510: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance

A study of poetry, fiction, and essays by African American writers from the era of World War I through the 1930s. Authors include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Nella Larsen, W.E.B. Du Bois, and others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 561
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250 or 260, or consent of instructor

ENG 511: Toni Morrison

In this discussion course, we will engage with literary criticism and analyze various novels and works of non-fiction by Toni Morrison, who was described in late 20th Century U.S. as "the closest thing the country has to a national writer." Discussions will include analysis of Morrison's depictions of Black Americans' experiences and the traumas of racism. Requires a researched term paper and exams.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 511
Prerequisite: Junior standing, 200-level (or higher) course in ENG or ETST or consent of instructor.

ENG 515: Gender and Modernist British/American Literature

A study of the construction of gender in early 20th-century fiction and poetry. Authors include Cather, Woolf, Lawrence, Hemingway, Sassoon, and others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 445
Prerequisite: Junior standing, an intermediate course in English or gender studies, or consent of instructor

ENG 516: Literature and Human Rights

An interdisciplinary investigation of the aesthetics and ethics of representing human rights and their violations in literature and film. Texts include novels, plays, essays, and films on topics such as genocide, torture, and development.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 516, Global Studies 516
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 280, or consent of instructor

ENG 517: Topics in Human Rights

This course will address an advanced topic in the study of human rights such as human rights and narrative forms, ethical witnessing, or humanitarianism.

Topic for Fall 2020: The Coming-of-Age Novel
Are we growing up according to plot? Is our coming-of-age prescribed in the coming-of-age novels that we read? This course explores the role of the bildungsroman, or coming-of-age novel, in shaping who we think we should be, who we are, and who we are becoming as human rights subjects.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor

ENG 518: Narratives of Inequality

Is globalization really shrinking the global divide between rich and poor, or is this mere fiction? To explore this question, we will examine contemporary novels and films that showcase individuals in India and China as they grapple with issues such as economic migration, class struggle, and terrorism.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 518
Prerequisite: ENG 280, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 521: Narratives of International News

A study of the literature that re-presents world events in different ways from the mainstream news media. Texts include novels, memoirs, graphic novels, or documentary dramas.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 521
Prerequisite: ENG 280, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 522: Literature and the Environment

An interdisciplinary investigation of the ways that literature shapes environmental values and practices as well as responds to environmental concerns. We will study novels, films, and essays on topics such as organic food and farming, air and water pollution, and environmental justice movements.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 522
Prerequisite: Junior standing

ENG 525: Contemporary Critical Theory

A survey of important movements. Among the readings are selections by Derrida, Foucault, and Bakhtin as well as selections from more recent figures, such as Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Cornel West, and bell hooks.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor

ENG 527: History of the Book

To provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Book History, which should help students think more critically about the impact of material culture on intellectual activity. The course will be taught as a speaking intensive seminar, which means that students will frequently be responsible for presenting reading material and leading discussion in the first half of class.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 385
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

ENG 550: Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction

A writing workshop for students with previous creative writing experience.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 350 or ENG 360

ENG 560: Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

A workshop for students with previous fiction writing experience.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 360 or consent of instructor

ENG 562: Advanced Creative Writing: Novel Writing

Course for students composing creative, book-length works of prose.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 350 or ENG 360, and ENG 550 or ENG 560

ENG 565: Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

A workshop for students with previous poetry writing experience.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 370 or consent of instructor

ENG 568: Poetry as Practice

This workshop-based course is for advanced poetry students who would like to delve more deeply into the craft of poetry. The course will include intensive readings in contempoary poetry and poetics, frequent poetry workshops, and a practical introduction to the world of publishing. Sudents will produce a substantial poetry portfolio and will write several short papers and craft professional documents related to poetry publication. Recommended for students interested in applying to graduate programs in poetry.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 370 and ENG 565

ENG 590: Tutorial Studies in English

Tutorial study in the literature of various periods, English and American, and in literary forms and composition. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. Arrangements should be discussed with the department chair.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 591: Directed Study in English

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 599: Independent Study in English

Advanced study, arranged in consultation with the department chair. Students considering an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 600: Senior Seminar in English

A seminar involving analysis of theoretical, historical, critical, and literary readings at an advanced level in conjunction with students' research and writing of an original, substantial paper. Each section of the seminar will focus on a theme that can accommodate variety in students' individual research projects.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Majors only; junior standing for spring term, otherwise, senior standing; at least two English courses numbered 400 or above

ENG 601: Senior Seminar in Creative Writing

A seminar involving analysis of theoretical, critical, literary, and practical (i.e.,craft-related) readings at an advanced level in conjunction with students' writing of an original, substantial creative work, in either poetry or prose. Students working in different genres will have the opportunity to read one another's work and discuss, as a group, both the challenges and possibilities associated with composing lengthy creative projects. Each section of the seminar will focus on a theme that can accommodate variety in students' individual research projects.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Majors only; junior standing for spring term, otherwise, senior standing; at least two English courses numbered 400 or above, and two workshops numbered 500 or above.

ENG 690: Tutorial Studies in English

Tutorial study in the literature of various periods, English and American, and in literary forms and composition. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. Arrangements should be discussed with the department chair.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 691: Directed Study in English

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 699: Independent Study in English

Advanced study, arranged in consultation with the department chair. Students considering an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.