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2020-2021 Course Catalog

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This catalog was created on Sunday, June 20, 2021.


Education

Professor:B. Williams (chair)
Associate professor:S. Purkey (Bee Connell Mielke Professor of Education)
Assistant professor:S. Burdick-Shepherd
Instructors:C. Despres-Berry (Center for Academic Success), A. Nottingham-Martin

The Mielke Family Department of Education offers teacher certification at the elementary and secondary levels and a minor in education studies for the bachelor of arts or bachelor of music degree. Our liberal arts approach prepares students to be outstanding classroom teachers or to pursue graduate study or work in education-related fields.

Teacher certification is available to Lawrence students, alumni, and graduates from other colleges and universities. Students pursuing teacher certification complete a major in their primary academic area along with education courses and practicums that satisfy requirements for licensure. Upon completion of Lawrence’s teacher education program, students are eligible to be certified for licensure in all states, and our alumni are employed as elementary and secondary school teachers in public and private schools around the world.

The education studies minor introduces students to the study of education as an academic discipline within the liberal arts. The minor supports academic and career interests in literacy; special education or school psychology; education policy; educational anthropology, sociology or psychology; philosophy of education; and practical applications in a variety of settings, including arts organizations, museums, and other cultural institutions.

Teacher certification for undergraduates

For elementary certification, Lawrence offers an innovative program in partnership with the Appleton Area School District. Open to all majors in the college or conservatory, the program includes a post-baccalaureate, full-school-year apprenticeship in an Appleton public elementary school, during which students learn to teach by working alongside a master veteran teacher while they also receive instruction in teaching methods for literacy, mathematics, science, and social studies. The post-baccalaureate apprenticeship is offered at a significantly reduced tuition fee.  

For secondary certification (middle and high school) or elective subjects at all grade levels, students complete a major in their subject area along with education courses and practicums and a full semester (18 weeks) of student teaching in a school near Lawrence, in Chicago, or internationally. Secondary certification is offered in English, social studies, science, mathematics, and computer science. All-levels certification is offered in art, music (through the conservatory only), theater, English as a second language (through the teaching ESL minor in linguistics), or world language (Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin, Russian, or Spanish). See “Major subject area requirements” below for specific areas (for music, see the Conservatory of Music section of the catalog). Some subjects can be added as a second certification area with a minor; contact the director of teacher education for more details.

Student teaching assignments for 18-week public or private school semesters are contracted with local schools near Lawrence, in the Chicago Center’s Urban Student Teaching Program, or in 17 different countries overseas through Lawrence's International Student Teaching Program. Lawrence undergraduates who have completed all graduation requirements except student teaching may student teach in the local schools at a greatly reduced 13th-term fee (see the catalog section on Tuition, Fees, and Financial Assistance). To qualify, the 18-week student teaching practicum must take place within one year of graduation. In some majors, students planning to student teach during the senior year may substitute student teaching for, or incorporate it into, their department’s Senior Experience. Interested students should consult with their major advisor as early as possible in the junior year.

Students who wish to qualify for a teaching license should plan their schedule with the guidance of an education faculty member as early as possible in their Lawrence career. Students who enter Lawrence knowing that they want to become certified to teach can do so within the four-year undergraduate program. Before student teaching, which must occur in the senior year or in a 13th term, students must be admitted to the teacher education program, and they must graduate before they may be certified for licensure.

Teacher certification for graduates

Students who have graduated from Lawrence or another college or university may be certified for licensure through Lawrence’s teacher education program. Elementary certification typically takes 2 years (including the full-year teaching apprenticeship), while secondary or all-levels certification typically takes 1-1/2 years (including the 18-week semester of student teaching). Program length may vary depending on undergraduate major and coursework. Graduates should consult the director of teacher education for specific requirements and tuition, which is significantly lower than the undergraduate tuition rate.

Graduates seeking certification must demonstrate a 3.00 major GPA in their subject area or attain qualifying scores on the relevant subject area test (Praxis II or ACTFL) before applying to be admitted to the teacher education program. Other requirements for admission are listed in Lawrence’s Teacher Certification Handbook, which is available from the education department.

Program standards

To be certified for licensure, all candidates must demonstrate proficiency in the following Lawrence University teacher education program standards, which are based on the Wisconsin state standards for licensure.

Content Knowledge

1. Understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structure(s) of the discipline and its connections with the various liberal arts and sciences.

Pedagogical Practice

2. Plans, organizes, and presents systematic instruction that makes the above aspects of the subject meaningful for students.

3. Uses a variety of instructional strategies, including instructional media and technology, to promote understanding.

4. Uses a variety of formal and informal assessment techniques to evaluate learning and adapt instruction.

Student Engagement

5. Uses effective verbal and nonverbal communication to foster active inquiry and engagement in learning.

6. Creates a supportive, productive learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, collaboration, and self-motivation.

Adaptive Expertise

7. Understands how children and adolescents learn and are motivated, individually and in groups, and teaches accordingly.

8. Matches instruction to differences in prior learning, ability, and exceptionality.

9. Demonstrates awareness of differences that arise from cultural background, gender, socio-economic status, or community context, and adapts instruction accordingly.

Professional Conduct

10. Acts in an ethical, professional manner and exhibits fairness, respect, and care in dealing with students.

11. Establishes positive relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community.

12. Demonstrates the ability to be self-critical and to use feedback to improve teaching practice.

Educational Mission

13. Understands the role of education in a democracy and the relationship between school and society.

Progress toward the standards is assessed in the pre-student teaching portfolio, and proficiency is confirmed in the final teaching portfolio, which includes the edTPA teacher performance assessment.

Requirements for teacher certification

Certification requirements are subject to change by the Wisconsin legislature and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction as well as by Lawrence’s teacher education program. Students must satisfy the requirements in force at the time of program completion in order to be certified for licensure. It is the student’s responsibility to confirm requirements with the education department.

General requirements for all students and subject areas

In addition to the required education courses (listed below), all students seeking certification must complete a major (or its equivalent) in the subject they plan to teach. For elementary education only, students may complete any major in the college or conservatory. To receive a minor endorsement, students must complete a department-approved minor or a minimum of seven courses in the discipline. Students seeking licensure must also complete Lawrence’s general education requirements (or the equivalent, for graduates from other universities).

Students who want to become licensed must first be admitted to Lawrence’s teacher education program. An application and Teacher Certification Handbook should be picked up from the education department’s administrative assistant in Briggs Hall 117. Students can apply after they have successfully completed one education course with a practicum, and they must have a composite GPA of at least 2.75 to be admitted.

Before they may student teach, students must attain a 3.00 major GPA (or, for elementary certification, a 3.00 GPA in all teacher education courses) or a passing score on the subject area assessment (Praxis II subject test or ACTFL foreign language oral and writing proficiency tests) for each subject in which they intend to be licensed. Elementary candidates must also receive a passing score on the Wisconsin Foundations of Reading Test. All candidates for student teaching submit a pre-student teaching portfolio in which they document their progress toward Lawrence’s 13 teacher education program standards. A member of the education or music education faculty reviews the portfolio in preparation for supervising the candidate’s student teaching.

During student teaching, candidates complete the edTPA, a teacher performance assessment, and submit it for official scoring. The edTPA is based on a learning segment of three to five lessons in one class, and it includes work samples and commentaries on planning, instruction, and assessment. Candidates must attain a passing score to be certified for licensure. Candidates must also receive satisfactory evaluations during student teaching and have a final composite GPA of at least 2.75 to be eligible for certification for licensure.

More information can be found in the Teacher Certification Handbook and on the department website.

Required core courses for teacher certification

Course

Lawrence course credit, in units

Certification semester hours

EDST 180: Psychology of Learning

6

4

EDST 350: Ethnicity, Cultural Diversity, and Education

6

4

EDUC 430: Educating All Learners (College only)

6

3

EDUC 431: Educating All Learners in Music (Conservatory only)

3

3

EDST 440: Sociology of Education

6

4

Required additional courses for elementary certification

Course

Lawrence course credit, in units

Certification semester hours

EDUC 412: The Science of Reading

6

4

EDUC 555: Methods in Elementary Teaching

6

4

EDUC 575: Elementary Content Area Methods I

3

3

EDUC 576: Elementary Content Area Methods II

3

3

EDUC 665: Advanced Methods in Teaching-Elementary I

3

3

EDUC 666: Advanced Methods in Teaching-Elementary II

3

3

EDUC 675: Student Teaching Apprenticeship-Elementary I

18

12

EDUC 676: Student Teaching Apprenticeship-Elementary II

18

12

EDUC 575, 665, and 675 are taken concurrently during the first semester of the elementary teaching apprenticeship, and EDUC 576, 666, and 676 are taken concurrently during the second semester.

Elementary certification also requires one course in environmental studies (ENST 150 is recommended and satisfies the B.A. general education requirement for a laboratory course in the natural sciences).

Required additional courses for secondary and all-levels certification

The following teaching methods and student teaching courses are required:

Course

Lawrence course credit, in units

Certification semester hours

EDUC 560: Methods in Middle and Secondary Teaching

6

4

EDUC 650 (or 655): Student Teaching

18

12

EDUC 660: Advanced Methods in Teaching

3

3

EDUC 560 is taken in spring term of the year prior to student teaching. EDUC 650 (or 655) and 660 are taken concurrently during the student teaching semester.

For all-levels certification, a supplemental course in subject-specific methods is required prior to student teaching. This is one or more of the following, depending on field(s):

Course

Lawrence course credit, in units

Certification semester hours

EDUC 563: Elementary and Secondary World Language Methods

2

2

EDUC 565: Methods in Teaching English Language Learners

6

4

EDUC 585: Art in the Elementary and Secondary Schools

2

2

† Taken in conjunction with EDUC 560.

Please see “Major subject area requirements” below and “The major in music education” for course requirements for specific fields.

Major subject area requirements

Wisconsin is transitioning to new licenses, so specific requirements are subject to change. Check with the education department as you plan your course of study.

Students are expected to complete the major requirements established by the relevant Lawrence department. To add a minor endorsement, students are expected to complete the minor requirements established by the relevant Lawrence department. In some cases, a minimum of 10 courses in the major subject or 7 courses in the minor may be accepted in lieu of the official Lawrence major or minor (see the director of teacher education for further information).

Art

The studio art major plus art teaching methods (EDUC 585).

Computer science

The computer science major.

English language arts

The English major with demonstrated familiarity with contemporary literature of world scope and coursework in composition, linguistics or history of the English language, literature for adolescents, literature of ethnic/racial minority groups in America, and theatre arts. Experience in journalism (writing for The Lawrentian) is recommended. A minor endorsement is available.

English as a second language (ESL/ELL)

The teaching ESL minor in linguistics (which includes ELL teaching methods) along with an academic major in any of the liberal arts and sciences. Students may add ESL/ELL certification to certification in another area.

Mathematics

The mathematic major. A minor endorsement is available.

Music

See the major in music education. Licensure in music must be done through the conservatory.

Science

Students complete a major in one of the sciences (biology, chemistry, environmental science, geosciences, or physics), a minimum of two courses in each of two other sciences, and at least one course in each of the remaining sciences. A course in environmental science is required.

Social studies

Students complete a major in one of the social studies (history, government/political science, economics, anthropology/sociology, psychology), a minimum of two courses in each of two other social studies, and at least one course in each of the remaining social studies. Non-history majors are strongly urged to take a minimum of two history courses, one in U.S. history and one in global history. A course in environmental studies is required. Instruction in consumer cooperatives and conservation is incorporated into the methods course (EDUC 560).

Theater

The theatre arts major. A minor endorsement is available.

World languages

A major in Chinese, Classics, French, German, Japanese, Russian, or Spanish. For all languages except Latin, it is required that students spend a term in a country studying its native language. To be certified, students must pass the ACTFL oral and writing proficiency test if their major GPA is less than 3.00. A minor endorsement is available.


Courses - Education Studies

EDST 180: Psychology of Learning

An introduction to brain structure and development in childhood and adolescence, memory systems and types of learning, and approaches to building knowledge, improving skills, and deepening understanding. Culminating topics include motivation, the nature and development of expertise, and instructional design.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 180

EDST 191: Directed Study in Education Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 191: Directed Study in Education

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 195: Internship in Education Studies

Internship in a school or district office, museum or arts organization, other non-profit or community organization, social services agency, governmental body, policy or advocacy group, or other education-related setting with prior approval. (Does not count toward teacher certification.) The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter registration required.

EDST 210: Topics in Education and Community Engagement

In this topics course, students combine practice in the community with academic coursework to examine a contemporary issue in education and society. typically, one-third of the course takes place in community settings. May be repeated when topics are different.

Topic for Fall 2020: Early Childhood Literacy
This course examines the role and practice of early childhood literacy development in a community. Students will practice reading with young children in community-based settings using early childhood literature. Students complete 2 units of course work in winter term and then design individual practical application in the community in the spring term for an additional 1 unit. Course will meet on campus and offsite.
Units: 1 TO 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

EDUC 253: Theatre Techniques for Educators

Whether preparing to work as a classroom teacher or in an arts organization, students will explore the power of theatre as a means to teach core content. Taught largely through the guided execution of theatre activities, students will participate in and create interactive curriculum. We will explore how theatre engages a variety of learners and research its history of efficacy with English Learners, underserved communities and students with special needs.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 253

EDST 270: Why Read Children's Books?

This seminar explores the complex ways children's literature affect readers of all ages. We will immerse ourselves in reading works from Where the Wild Things Are to Charlotte's Web as we examine what it means to be a reader of children's literature by looking at our own and children's responses to the experience and joy of reading. Discussion, reflective writing and collaborative community projects.
Units: 6.

EDST 282: Border Crossings in Children's and Young Adult Literature

This seminar uses the concept of crossing borders--im/emigrating, transgressing boundaries, occupying margins--as a focus for critical exploration of children's and young adult literature. What should books for young people be and do? Ho doe these texts participate in systems of power and developing social identities? Critical readings draw on literary, ethnic, gender, and disability studies. Discussion, short papers, and final paper/project.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 284
Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

EDST 283: Beyond "Who lives? Who dies? Who tells your story?":Gender in Adolescent & Young Adult Literature

This seminar engages students in critically reading literature for and about adolescents that focuses on depictions and constructions of gender and sexuality. Readings may include novels/graphic novels, poetry, and memoir, as well as scholarship on young adult literature with approaches drawn from gender, literacy, literary, ethnic, and disability studies. Discussion, short papers, and final project.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 283
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 309: Hollywood Goes to High School

Year after year, Hollywood turns out movies that are set in schools and present images of teachers and teens. Many of these films address typical coming-of-age issues, societal fear of teen crime and delinquency and, of course, the search for romance. A subset of these films provide powerful and culturally enduring images of teachers and teaching. High school movies also provide insight into the fantasies, anxieties, dreams, and assumptions prevalent in American culture. This course will examine the world and worldview found in Hollywood high school movies and the extent to which the stories they tell make us who we are.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 309
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 310: Ethics and Education

What is ethics and how does it connect with morals? What do either have to do with the activities of teaching and learning? Students in this class confront such questions by exploring the role of moral decision-making in classroom practices, and by examining how the practice of education promotes certain notions of human flourishing. Particular attention is given to an analysis of the "ethics of teaching." Readings draw from classical and contemporary works associated with the disciplines of philosophy and of education.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 315: Philosophy of Children

Students will consider childhood and children through a philosophical lens. The first half of the course will focus on the philosophy of childhood; the second half will focus on how children philosophize the world, children's rights, and adult responsibilities. Readings will derive from philosophical texts, fiction and children's literature, and social media. Students may elect to also enroll in EDST 316 for a field experience practicum in elementary classrooms.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 316: Philosophy of Children Practicum

Field experiences in elementary classrooms encouraging children's wonder through philosophical discussion. This is an optional practicum for the course EDST 315 Philosophy of Children. Students will design philosophy lessons for young children and will conduct these lessons in small cooperative groups.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: Must be concurrently enrolled in EDST 315

EDST 345: Distributed Cognition and the Extended Mind

The new science of the mind treats cognition as a distributed process involving the brain, body, and world. This seminar explores the role of material settings and tools, bodily engagement, social interaction, and cultural processes in human reasoning, problem solving, and learning. Students will write short papers examining aspects of cognitive activity in real-world settings.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Cognitive Science 345, Anthropology 345, Psychology 345
Prerequisite: PHIL 105 recommended

EDST 350: Ethnicity, Cultural Diversity, and Education

A study of the experience of children and adolescents from different ethnic, cultural, and economic groups. Emphasis on understanding the social consequences of these differences and how such differences affect educational achievement and attainment. The sources and educational effects of individual, institutional, and systemic racism, sexism, and other forms of prejudice and discrimination will also be examined. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 352
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 380: Engaging in Action Research

This course engages students in social science research to collect and use data to solve real problems. Students interested in careers that emphasize working with others (teaching, counseling, nursing, social work) will find this course particularly relevant. Content will explore methods of examining instructional effectiveness. Lab will consist of classroom-based research experiences, data analysis, and collaborative inquiry.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: EDST 180 and Sophomore standing

EDST 387: Picture Books and Graphic Novels for Children and Young Adults

This seminar examines narratives for young people that combine text and image. It introduces concepts from literary, aesthetic, design, and cultural criticism to examine how audiences interpret these works, focusing attention on questions of representation and subjectivity. Selected works encompass fiction and non-fiction and may include picture books, graphic novels/comics, hybrid books, and digital/hyperlinked narratives. Discussion, short papers and visual projects, and collaborative final project.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing.

EDST 390: Tutorial in Education Studies

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational policy, environmental education, history of education, comparative education and on various topics related to the social foundations of education.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDUC 390: Tutorial Studies in Education

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational psychology, learning theory, cognitive science, alternative education and on various topics related to teaching and learning.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 391: Directed Study in Education Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 391: Directed Study in Education

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 395: Internship in Education Studies

Internship in a school or district office, museum or arts organization, other non-profit or community organization, social services agency, governmental body, policy or advocacy group, or other education-related setting with prior approval. (Does not count toward teacher certification.) The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter registration required.

EDST 399: Independent Study in Education Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDUC 399: Independent Study in Education

Advanced study arranged in consultation with the department. Students considering a senior honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 400: The Environment, Community, and Education

The course will examine the relationship between community-mindedness and the development of ecological literacy. Cultural assumptions about the natural world and our place in it that are implicit within the K-12 and college curriculum, and the manner in which modern forms of education shape our understanding of what it means to “live well in a place we know well” will be explored. Examples of how schools can contribute to environmental and social sustainability (and justice) via community- and place-based education will be presented.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 460
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

EDST 410: Impossible Choices? Ethical Dilemmas in Education

In this course we question conventional understandings of what the good is, what it should be, and what it can be in educational contexts. We discuss common ethical dilemmas central to schooling, including how these intersect with issues of race, class, and gender, and we consider challenges to traditional schooling structures.Papers include case studies and reflections.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing

EDUC 412: The Science of Reading

Students engage with literacy theory, explore reading development and the acquisition of reading competency, plan for literacy assessment and instruction (with attention to English language learners and learning disabilities), and integrate literacy with content instruction. Required for elementary teacher certification to prepare for the Foundations of Reading Test. Open to all students.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: EDST 180 and sophomore standing

EDUC 430: Educating All Learners

This course for students in the Teacher Education Program focuses on two important aspects of K-12 teaching: (1) helping learners develop academic and disciplinary literacy; and (2) tailoring instruction to specific learning needs (for students with disabilities, English language learners, struggling readers, students with gaps in academic knowledge, gifted students, etc.). Practicum of 20 hours required in a subject area class that includes learners with special needs.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: EDST 180 and junior standing

EDUC 431: Educating All Learners - Music

This course for students seeking certification to teach music (choral, general, and/or instrumental) focuses on adapting music instruction to learners with disabilities. Practicum of 10 hours required in a music class that includes learners with special needs.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: EDST 180, junior standing, and declared major in music education

EDST 440: Sociology of Education

An examination of the social foundations of education in the United States with particular attention paid to the cultural, political, and economic functions of education in modern society. Other topics include the reproductive function of schooling in a society divided along lines of race/ethnicity and class, schools as sites of cultural production, and the historical tension in the U.S. between “equality” and “excellence” in education. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 340
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 450: Topics in Education Studies

This seminar explores issues in contemporary education. Topics vary by term and focus on controversies or innovations in educational systems, practices, and policy or in the relations between school and society. May be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and one course in education studies or instructor approval

EDUC 555: Methods in Elementary Teaching

For students preparing to teach in the elementary classroom. Students will practice and observe methodologies in instructional strategies, assessment, and organization of the elementary environment. Students will analyze how learner, subject, and environment influence pedagogical choice with emphasis on collaborative learning, differentiated instruction, and developmentally appropriate practice.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and admission to the teacher certification program

EDUC 560: Methods in Middle and Secondary Teaching

A seminar on methods and organization of teaching particular subjects in the middle and secondary school, including English, social studies, mathematics, science, and theatre. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and admission to certification program

EDUC 563: Elementary and Secondary World Language Methods

A seminar on teaching world languages in the elementary, middle, and high school. Emphasis on curriculum planning, methods of instruction, and assessment of learning.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: Taken concurrently with EDUC 560

EDUC 565: Methods in Teaching English Language Learners

A seminar in teaching English to speakers of other languages in elementary, middle, and secondary school as well as in foreign language classrooms abroad. The course focuses on curriculum planning, methods of instruction, and assessment of learning for English language learners in diverse learning environments. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor

EDUC 575: Elementary Content Area Methods I

This course is for students concurrently enrolled in the elementary student teaching apprenticeship. The apprenticeship will design and teach lessons engaging elementary students and young children in the fundamental content, concepts, and inquiry tools of mathematics, English language arts, social studies, science, fine arts, physical education and health. Two-course sequence.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree, admission to elementary teacher certification, and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 665 and EDUC 675

EDUC 576: Elementary Content Area Methods II

Continuation of EDUC 575.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: EDUC 575 and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 666 and 676

EDUC 585: Art in the Elementary and Secondary Schools

A seminar on teaching art in the elementary, middle, and high school. Emphasis on curriculum planning, methods of instruction, and assessment of learning.
Units: 2.
Also listed as Studio Art 585
Prerequisite: Taken concurrently with EDUC 560 history courses.

EDST 590: Tutorial in Education Studies

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational policy, environmental education, history of education, comparative education and on various topics related to the social foundations of education.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDUC 590: Tutorial Studies in Education

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational psychology, learning theory, cognitive science, alternative education and on various topics related to teaching and learning.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 591: Directed Study in Education Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 591: Directed Study in Education

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 595: Internship in Education Studies

Internship in a school or district office, museum or arts organization, other non-profit or community organization, social services agency, governmental body, policy or advocacy group, or other education-related setting with prior approval. (Does not count toward teacher certification.) The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter registration required.

EDST 599: Independent Study in Education Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDUC 599: Independent Study in Education

Advanced study arranged in consultation with the department. Students considering a senior honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 650: Student Teaching (Middle and Secondary Schools)

Student teaching is normally taken during Term I, coinciding with the public school fall semester. A weekly seminar at Lawrence is required as part of this course. See department chair for prerequisites and for exceptions to the Term I requirement.
Units: 18.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and admission to certification program; contact department chair about prerequisites and corequisites

EDUC 655: International Student Teaching

This is an overseas student teaching option. After nine weeks of student teaching in the Fox Valley, students will be placed in one of 16 countries to complete the student teaching practicum. International student teaching is available during 13th Term only. Students must have been admitted to the student teaching program (college or conservatory) and have met all requirements for domestic student teaching. Students should contact the department chair for additional admission and fee requirements.
Units: 18.
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status, admission to the student teaching program and to the international student teaching program, passing score on Praxis II or ACTFL, proficiency tests and, beginning in 2015, a passing score on the TPA during the first 9 weeks of domestic student teaching.

EDUC 660: Advanced Methods in Teaching

The seminar will engage students in critical reflection upon their student teaching experience. Concrete and theoretical problems having to do with teaching and learning will be explored (e.g., classroom management, assessment of pupil performance, curriculum design, instructional methods), as will issues having to do with educational policy and school organization.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 650 or consent of instructor

EDUC 665: Advanced Methods in Teaching-Elementary I

The seminar will engage students in critical reflection upon their elementary student teaching experience. Concrete and theoretical problems of teaching and learning will be explored (e.g., classroom management, assessment, curriculum design), as will issues regarding educational policy and school organization. Two-course sequence taken in conjunction with the student teaching apprenticeship.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree, admission to elementary teacher certification and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 575 and 675

EDUC 666: Advanced Methods in Teaching-Elementary II

A continuation of EDUC 665.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: EDUC 665 and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 576 and EDUC 676

EDUC 675: Student Teaching Apprenticeship-Elementary I

Student teaching for elementary licensure (EC-MC) is a full-time, two-semester apprenticeship in a K-6 grade classroom setting. This post-baccalaureate apprenticeship is an embedded clinical experience whereby the student teacher will learn the craft and art of teaching under the guidance of a master teacher from the Appleton Area School District.
Units: 18.
Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree, admission to elementary teacher certification, and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 575 and EDUC 665

EDUC 676: Student Teaching Apprenticeship-Elementary II

Continuation of EDUC 675.
Units: 18.
Prerequisite: EDUC 675 and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 576 and EDUC 666

EDST 690: Tutorial in Education Studies

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational policy, environmental education, history of education, comparative education and on various topics related to the social foundations of education.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDUC 690: Tutorial Studies in Education

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational psychology, learning theory, cognitive science, alternative education and on various topics related to teaching and learning.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 691: Directed Study in Education Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 691: Directed Study in Education

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDST 695: Internship in Education Studies

Internship in a school or district office, museum or arts organization, other non-profit or community organization, social services agency, governmental body, policy or advocacy group, or other education-related setting with prior approval. (Does not count toward teacher certification.) The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter registration required.

EDUC 695: Internship In Education

The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.

EDST 699: Independent Study in Education Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDUC 699: Independent Study in Education

Advanced study arranged in consultation with the department. Students considering a senior honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.