Honors Convocation Program

Thursday, May 27, 2021
11:15 a.m.
Virtual Convocation

Prelude

Jupiter’s Moons

Judith Lang Zaimont
(b. 1945)

Ami Hatori ’23, piano

Land Acknowledgement

Dineah Peterson ’21

 

Recognition of Students Elected to Honor Societies
and Recipients of Awards and Prizes

Mark Burstein
Lawrence University President

 

Introduction of Professor Megan Pickett

Allison Fleshman
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Address
The Stars: Mansions Made by Nature’s Hand

Megan Pickett
Associate Professor of Physics
and recipient of the 2021 Faculty Convocation Award

 

Postlude

On a Clear Day

Burton Lane
(1912-1997)
Alan Jay Lerner
(1918-1986)
arr. Darmon Meader
(b. 1961)

Courtney Wilmington ’22, soprano vocals
Samara Morris ’21, alto vocals
Jack Murphy ’21, tenor vocals
David Womack ’22, bass vocals
Nick Muellner ’20, alto and tenor saxophones
Alyssa Kuss ’22, baritone saxophone
Jack Benedict ’21, trumpet
Allie Goldman ’21, trombone
Carson Bell ’22, guitar
Rowan Barcham, keyboard
Ali Remondini ’21, double bass
Daniel Green ’21, drum set

Lyrics:
On a clear day, rise and look around you
And you’ll see who you are
On a clear day, how it will astound you
That the glow of your being outshines every star
You’ll feel part of ev’ry mountain, sea, and shore
You can hear from far and near a world you’ve never heard before
But on that clear day, on that clear day
You can see forever and ever and ever more!

 

Megan Pickett
Megan Pickett was 12 years old, holding a copy of H.A. Rey’s book, The Stars, under her arm as she stared at the stars above from her suburban Detroit neighborhood. She says she knew at that moment she’d dedicate her life’s work to sharing the joy and wonder of the night sky. But “light pollution,” the ever-increasing brightening of the sky by artificial lighting, is ruining the view for much of the world. In her Convocation address today, the associate professor of physics at Lawrence University will discuss solutions to the “light pollution” problem that she and many other astronomers have advocated for and show why losing this ephemeral natural resource has far-reaching economic, health, and biological costs.

For more information please see www.lawrence.edu/info/news/convocations