Please note: The information displayed here is current as of Thursday, December 13, 2018, but the official Course Catalog should be used for all official planning.

2017-2018 Course Catalog

Period: 2018-20192017-20182016-20172015-20162014-2015

This catalog was created on Thursday, December 13, 2018.


Anthropology

Professor:P. Peregrine
Associate professors:C. Daughtry, B. Jenike (Edward F. Mielke Professor of Ethics in Medicine, Science and Society), M. Jenike (chair)
Assistant professor:L. Murali (on leave term(s) I)
Visiting assistant professor:D. Proctor

Anthropology is the study of humanity in all its cultural, biological, linguistic, and historical diversity. A synthesis of scientific and humanistic concerns and methods, it attempts to distinguish universal human characteristics from those unique to individual social groups, and to understand the reasons for differences between individuals and groups.

The insights of anthropology are essential for a critical understanding of the problems of the contemporary world. Anthropology informs a public confronted with choices to be made with respect to changing value systems; competing social goals; ethnic, religious, class, gender, and race relations; new and emerging technologies; environmental and cultural resources management; changing paradigms of health, wellness, and disease; linguistic diversity; and international relations.

Anthropology offers both unique theoretical perspectives and a particular set of methodological approaches. The faculty considers it essential that we educate our students in both. Students should take away from their studies a substantive knowledge of the commonalities and differences in human experiences and also an understanding of how that knowledge is obtained and evaluated.

The anthropology major thus prepares students for successful entry into any number of professional and graduate programs, as well as careers that require a multicultural approach and perspective. Our mission is to represent anthropology appropriately at Lawrence and in the wider communities within which we live and work, and to educate others wherever and whenever possible with the insights that anthropology has to offer.

The anthropology department at Lawrence includes a range of courses and opportunities for guided independent study from the complementary perspectives of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and ethnology. Faculty members provide expertise in a number of ethnographic areas, including North and West Africa, India, East Asia, the Middle East, and North America. Topical interests include archaeological methods, refugee communities, medical anthropology, linguistic anthropology, biological anthropology, and museum studies. The department maintains two well-equipped laboratories, as well as collections of archaeological and ethnographic materials from many culture areas. The department holds a full suite of geophysical equipment for non-invasive archaeology and also provides equipment for audio and video data collection and transcription to support research in the cultural and linguistic anthropology subfields.

Required core courses for the anthropology major

  1. The following introductory courses:
    1. ANTH 110: Cultural Anthropology
    2. ANTH 120: World Prehistory
    3. ANTH 140: Biological Anthropology
  2. ANTH 200: History of Anthropological Ideas (Students are expected to complete this course during their sophomore year and no later than the end of their junior year.)
  3. ANTH 501: Research Questions in Anthropology
  4. ANTH 601: Research Design in Anthropology
  5. Completion of the requirements for one of the tracks listed below.

Required for the anthropology major: cultural anthropology and general track

  1. Students are expected to complete the following methods courses during their sophomore year and no later than the end of their junior year:
    1. ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology
    2. ANTH 210: Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology
  2. Four six-unit elective courses in anthropology, including at least one upper-division seminar (courses numbered in the 500s). (Anthropology majors are urged to take several of these seminars in their junior and senior years.)

 

Required for the anthropology major: linguistic anthropology track

  1. Students are expected to complete the following methods courses by the end of their sophomore year:
    1. ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology
    2. ANTH 210: Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology
  2. ANTH 330: Language and Culture or ANTH 331: Introduction to Sociolinguistics (sophomore year)
  3. ANTH 430: Methods in Linguistic Anthropology (junior year)
  4. ANTH 530: Topics in Linguistic Anthropology or ANTH 531: Semiotics
  5. One additional six-unit elective course in anthropology

Note: All required courses in the linguistic anthropology track also apply towards completion of the cultural anthropology track.

Required for the anthropology major: archaeology track

  1. Students are expected to complete the following methods courses during their sophomore year and no later than the end of their junior year:
    1. ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology
    2. ANTH 220: Research Methods in Archaeology or another approved field experience
    3. ANTH 222: Historic Preservation Theory and Practice
  2. Six units of ANTH 422: Archaeological Collections Management
  3. Three six-unit elective courses in anthropology, including ANTH 520: Topics in Archaeology or a related 500-level seminar.

Required for the anthropology major: biological anthropology track

  1. BIOL 130: Integrative Biology: Cells to Organisms
  2. BIOL 150: Integrative Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems
  3. ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology or BIOL 170: Integrative Biology: Experimental Design and Analysis. ANTH 210 is recommended for students pursuing an interest in biocultural anthropology via the biological anthropology track. Students are expected to complete this requirement during their sophomore year and no later than the end of their junior year.
  4. Three six-unit elective courses in anthropology, including ANTH 540: Topics in Biological Anthropology.
  5. Three six-unit courses in biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics, or physics, at least two of which must be biology courses numbered 200 or above and at least one of which must be a laboratory course.

Required for the anthropology minor

  1. Two of the following courses:
    • ANTH 110: Cultural Anthropology
    • ANTH 120: World Prehistory
    • ANTH 140: Biological Anthropology
  2. Three six-unit electives in anthropology, selected from courses numbered 200 and above, except ANTH 501 or 601
  3. One six-unit upper-division seminar (courses numbered in the 500s)
  4. C average in the minor

Teacher Certification in Social Studies

Anthropology majors can seek certification to teach social studies at the secondary level. For certification in broad-field social studies, students must complete the major and a minimum of two courses each in two other social studies (economics, government/political science, history, or psychology) and at least one course in each of the remaining social studies. Students are strongly encouraged to take a course in U.S. history and a course in global history. A course in environmental studies is also required. Students can seek endorsement to teach English as a second language by completing the Teaching ESL minor in linguistics. Students who plan to seek teacher certification should review the requirements in the Education section of the catalog and meet with the director of teacher education, preferably before the end of the sophomore year.

Senior Experience in Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology's Senior Experience is a two-course sequence which marks the culmination of a four-year series of core courses designed to develop the student's abilities to reason and practice as an anthropologist. Students begin their study of anthropology with a three-course introductory sequence, and move on in their sophomore year to a three-course theory and methods sequence. After further exploration of their specific interests within anthropology through elective courses and off-campus study, students continue their development with ANTH 501, which introduces them to the process of formulating research questions. In their senior year students take ANTH 601, which provides students the opportunity to reflect upon and synthesize what they have learned in the anthropology program by designing a focused research project. These projects are presented to the anthropology faculty and student majors during a formal symposium at the end of the Winter Term.


Courses - Anthropology

ANTH 110: Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the nature of culture, the organization of social relations, and the relationships between values and behavior. Attention to language, kinship, and religion as cultural systems, as well as to forms of social control, stratification and inequality in relation to culture (including gender, race, ethnicity, and class). Social patterns and processes within and across cultures examined through ethnographic cases studies from around the world.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing; consent of instructor required for juniors and seniors

ANTH 120: World Prehistory

An introduction to the peoples and cultures of the world from 40,000 years ago to 2,000 years ago. Major events in world prehistory, such as the origins of agriculture, the rise of cities, and the spread of states, are examined and discussed. General trends in cultural evolution are proposed and evaluated. This course may not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing; consent of instructor required for juniors and seniors

ANTH 140: Biological Anthropology

The study of humans as biological organisms. Topics addressed include processes of evolutionary change and stasis; primate diversity, ecology, and behavior; morphological, ecological, and genetic perspectives on human evolution; and contemporary human biological variation, including racial variation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing; consent of instructor required for juniors and seniors

ANTH 191: Directed Study in Anthropology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 195: Internship in Anthropology

Applied work in anthropology arranged and carried out under the direction of an instructor. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 200: History of Anthropological Ideas

A study of the development of anthropology as a scholarly discipline and a method of inquiry. Consideration of theoretical perspectives such as evolutionism, historical particularism, functionalism, cultural materialism, structuralism, interpretive and postmodernist approaches, and also the significance of participant-observation and other field research strategies in shaping anthropological knowledge.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110, 120, or 140, preferably all three. Recommended for anthropology majors in the sophomore year; must be completed by the end of the junior year.

ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology

An introduction to the collection and manipulation of quantitative data in anthropological research. Topics include sampling, measurement, and basic nominal and ordinal statistics.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110, 120, or 140, preferably all three. Recommended for anthropology majors in the sophomore year; must be completed by the end of the junior year.

ANTH 210: Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to basic assumptions and methods of research in sociocultural anthropology, including participant observation, ethnographic interview, focus groups, cognitive methods, survey, and census. Students gain hands-on experience in research.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110, 120, or 140, preferably all three. Recommended for anthropology majors in the sophomore year; must be completed by the end of the junior year.

ANTH 220: Research Methods in Archaeology

Presents the research process in archaeology and offers an overview of essential data-collection and analysis techniques, including site survey and excavation, settlement pattern analysis, lithic analysis, and ceramic analysis. Students will take part in field research. When this course is scheduled at 8-noon TR, class will dismiss early for scheduled convocations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 260
Prerequisite: ANTH 120

ANTH 222: Historic Preservation Theory and Practice

Historic preservation endeavors to identify and conserve historic objects, properties, and landscapes. It has become a focal task for many anthropologists today. This course introduces students to the basic theory of historic preservation, the laws guiding practice, and the techniques used by historic preservation professionals.
Units: 6.

ANTH 306: Anthropology of Gender

An anthropological approach to the study of gender and a/sexuality, and how they intersect with other dimensions of social difference such as race, class, and ethnicity. Topical, ethnographic approach to examining these intersections. Focus on issues such as sexual behavior, reproduction, parenting, transgender identity, work, communication, and violence.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 350
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or GEST 100

ANTH 310: Ecological Anthropology

A study of relationships between human communities and their natural environments (i.e., humans studied as members of ecosystems). Topics include the interactions between environment, human biology, and social organization and anthropological perspectives on global environmental problems.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 365
Prerequisite: One anthropology course or consent of instructor

ANTH 312: Economic Anthroplogy

An introduction to the theories, concepts and methods of economic anthropology, focusing on the relationship between socioeconomic lives and social power structures. Explores how people engage with economic choices, decisions, and risk from an anthropological perspective. Topics include morality, rationality, value, exchange, debt, work, globalization, poverty and wealth, power.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110

ANTH 320: Archaeology of Gender

An examination of the relationship between gender and material culture. Focus on how gender and gender roles are reflected in the archaeological record and on the problems in identifying and determining gender roles in prehistory. Readings include studies from both the Old and New Worlds and modern theoretical approaches.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 351
Prerequisite: One anthropology course or consent of instructor

ANTH 322: Archaeology of North America

An introduction to the ancient peoples of North America from the initial colonists to the peoples who encountered European colonists some 13,000 years later. Special emphasis is given to the ancient inhabitants of the Great Lakes region.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 120

ANTH 324: Archaeology of Prehistoric Greece

A study of archaeological investigations in the Aegean region — Greece, Crete, the Cycladic Islands, and western Turkey. Emphasis on the evidence of cultural development from Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers and herders through the development of the Bronze Age “palace” civilizations of the Minoans and Mycenaeans.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Classics 365
Prerequisite: ANTH 120 or consent of instructor

ANTH 326: Bizarrchaeology

Much of the public’s interest in archaeology focuses on “mysteries” of the past or allegedly “unexplainable” phenomena. Since the past is largely impossible to know, it is easy to uncritically fill it with products of the imagination rather than products of ancient peoples. This course examines some of these “imaginary” pasts and the practice of creating them.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 120

ANTH 328: Ethics in Archaeology: Who owns the past?

An exploration of ethical and legal concerns surrounding archaeology: the ownership and treatment of archaeological remains and relations between archaeologists and descendent communities. Topics include the ethics and legality of collecting looting, and the antiquities market; archaeology and nationalism; repatriation of skeletons and artifacts; and professional responsibilities of archaeologists.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 325, Classics 368
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ANTH 120, an ARHI course (preferably ancient to Renaissance), or consent of instructor

ANTH 330: Language and Culture

An introduction to the core concepts of linguistic anthropology, definitions of language, basic methods of linguistic anthropology (observation, transcription, analysis, ethnography), power and language, language discrimination, and language ideology theory. Lectures, discussions, and labs.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 330
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or LING 150

ANTH 331: Introduction to Sociolinguistics

This course presents an introduction to sociolinguistics, a discipline within linguistics concerned with the systematic investigation of language in relation to the social world. Topics include language variation and change, social identity and language use, linguistic diversity, and language ideologies. We will also practice methods for collecting and analyzing sociolinguistic data.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 325
Prerequisite: LING 150 or ANTH 110

ANTH 340: Human Biology, Evolution, and Health

Students will develop an understanding of modern human biology as the outcome of interactions between evolved genomes and the myriad environments in which we are born, develop and live out our lives. Topics of study will include evolutionary approaches to reproduction, growth and development, health, behavior, adaptation, and life history.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 140, BIOL 150, or consent of instructor

ANTH 341: Human Variation

A survey of human biological variation and adaptation. Topics include the geographic distribution of human variation; evolutionary approaches to understanding human diversity; historic and modern concepts of race and ethnicity; human biological adaptations to disease, climate, poverty, and other stressors; and the genetics of simple and complex traits.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 341
Prerequisite: ANTH 140, BIOL 110, or consent of instructor

ANTH 342: Medical Anthropology

An introduction to the comparative, cross-cultural study of health, healing, and beliefs about the body and illness. Topics covered include: (1) biocultural approaches to understanding health; (2) social determinants of health (how social inequalities become embodied); (3) medical systems, including biomedicine, as cultural systems of knowledge and practice; (4) the social construction of illness and health; and (5) an introduction to global health.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, and ANTH 110 or 140

ANTH 344: Nutritional Anthropology

This course provides a basic introduction to human nutrition. It then considers the evolution of human nutrition through the study of primate nutrition and the putative diets of human ancestors. Finally, it considers anthropological approaches to understanding cross-cultural, intracultural, and life-cycle variation in modern human nutrition.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 140 or consent of instructor

ANTH 345: Distributed Cognition and the Extended Mind

The new science of the mind treats cognition as a distributed process involving the brain, body, and world. This seminar explores the role of material settings and tools, bodily engagement, social interaction, and cultural processes in human reasoning, problem solving, and learning. Students will write short papers examining aspects of cognitive activity in real-world settings.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 345, Education Studies 345
Prerequisite: PHIL 105 recommended

ANTH 347: Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

This course is an introduction to forensic anthropology and human osteology, including a comprehensive study of the human skeleton and sections on determining ancestry, sex, and age of a skeleton. Further topics include how to approach a crime scene, determining forensic significance, and the postmortem processes of the human body.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing required; ANTH 140 recommended

ANTH 348: Primate Behavior and Ecology

This course provides an introduction to the Order Primates. In addition to exploring the behavior and ecology of prosimians, monkeys, and apes, the course will cover techniques in primate behavioral observation. Further, biological and social adaptations will be examined in an evolutionary context.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and one of the following: ANTH 140, BIOL 140, BIOL 150, consent of instructor

ANTH 350: Indians of North America

A cultural study of the Indians of North America, including examination of the impact of European ideas and technology on Indian societies. Emphasis on environmental adaptations, levels of social and cultural complexity, problems of historical interpretation, and the methods and theories of ethnology and their applications to North American cultures.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 330
Prerequisite: ANTH 110

ANTH 353: Reading Ethnography

This seminar explores ethnography as the defining feature of cultural anthropology. Reading a range of articles and booklength works, students survey several ethnographic genres including classic realist, experimental, narrative, self-reflexive, and critical ethnography. Students also gain experience leading discussion and delivering oral reports and presentations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

ANTH 358: Ethnography of the Middle East and North Africa

Introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, an area of tremendous cultural, religious, linguistic, and economic diversity. Focus on the nature of ethnography as a research method and key areas of inquiry that have concerned anthropologists working in Arab and Muslim societies. Topics include social organization, tribalism, colonialism, gender, religion, nationalism, ethnic and religious minorities, and the politics of identity.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 332
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor

ANTH 360: Anthropology of South Asia

Introduces the complexity of South Asian society and culture through the study of ethnographies of gender, religious life, kinship, social organization, and economy in the colonial and post-colonial periods.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 335
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor

ANTH 364: Ethnography of East Asia

A critical and comparative examination of key areas of sociocultural change in present-day East Asia. Focusing on China, we address new areas of research in East Asian anthropology such as demographic change, modernization, urbanization and stratification, gender and the body politic, sexuality, pop culture, consumption, ethnic minorities and national cultural identities.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 364
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

ANTH 366: Ethnography of Japan

Critical examination of social and cultural (re)presentations of Japan from the postwar to the postmodern. Exploration of diversities of lived reality and social change in contemporary Japan. Topics include: national cultural identity, historical consciousness, family and gender ideologies, the Heisei recession, invisible and visible others, demographic change, sexuality, pop culture, youth culture, multiculturalism, and recovery from calamity.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 366
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

ANTH 372: Urban Anthropology of London

This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

ANTH 374: Identity and Place: Diaspora Experience in Comparative Perspective

An exploration of similarities and differences in refugee/diaspora communities. Issues explored include relationships between place and identity, memory and identity, notions of home and homeland, gender and class, assimilation versus resistance, social and cultural changes induced by migration and the impact of transnationalism.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and one course in anthropology or consent of instructor

ANTH 377: Culture and Aging

This course uses ethnographic studies from non-Western and Western societies to understand how the experience of aging throughout the life course not only differs cross-culturally, but also within the same society over time in response to increased longevity and biomedical advances. Of particular concern will be cultural constructions of health, well-being, disability, and dependency, including in-depth analysis of aging in Asia.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

ANTH 378: Anthropology of Food

All humans must consume food in order to live, but how "food" is defined, produced, procured, and interacted with is subject to endless variation. This class examines how food becomes more than just sustenance: how food acts as a means of building identities, making meaning, organizing society, and exerting power.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor

ANTH 390: Tutorial Studies in Anthropology

Advanced study of selected topics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 391: Directed Study in Anthropology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 395: Internship in Anthropology

Applied work in anthropology arranged and carried out under the direction of an instructor. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 399: Independent Study in Anthropology

Advanced research. Students considering an honors project should register for this course, for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 401: Research Preparation in Anthropology

Students will develop advanced library research skills with a focus on anthropological resources and topics. Each student will write a thematic annotated bibliography based on library research, consider ethical implications of empirical research on the topic they have chosen, and formulate a plan for their senior experience foundation and independent study courses. This course will also explore career development for anthroplogy majors. Seminar.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 200 and junior or senior standing

ANTH 422: Practicum in Archaeological Collections Management

Applied work in all aspects of archaeological collections management from cleaning and conservation to cataloguing and storage. Students will work with Lawrence's existing archaeological collections and materials generated from ongoing field and laboratory research. Collection projects vary from term to term. Course may be repeated in subsequent terms for no more than a total of 6 units.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: ANTH 222

ANTH 430: Methods in Linguistic Anthropology

A hands-on introduction to advanced linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics methods and relevant theories. Will cover transcription, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, and narrative analysis. Classes will be a combination of labs, workshops, and seminars. Prerequisites are non-negotiable.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 430
Prerequisite: Junior standing, and ANTH 210, ANTH 330, or ANTH 331

ANTH 441: Anthropology of Medical Humanitarianism

This course draws upon global case studies of humanitarian intervention in order to encourage students to engage critically with the complexity of what seems like an unequivocal good: humanitarian aid. Through a variety of audiovisual materials, texts, and oral and written assignments, students will develop a strong critical appreciation of the global political economy of aid and of the ethical dilemmas that accompany lifesaving.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110

ANTH 450: Senegalese Culture

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks. Offered in alternate years.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 400
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

ANTH 500: Topics in Anthropology

An examination of a particular topic in contemporary anthropology. The specific topic investigated changes each year. Students are expected to carry out independent research on the topic, either through a review of relevant literature or through field or laboratory work.

Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and at least two courses in anthropology or consent of instructor

ANTH 512: Fictions of Africa

An exploration of African culture and history through literature and film by African authors/directors. Issues to be explored include African debates on colonialism, post-colonialism, gender, class, and ethnic stratification, religion, modernization and development. Fictional works will be discussed in tandem with ethnographic monographs and critical essays.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 512
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and at least two other courses in the social sciences

ANTH 520: Topics in Archaeology

An examination of a particular topic in contemporary archaeological research. The specific topic investigated changes each year. Students are expected to carry out independent research on the topic, either through a review of relevant literature or through field or laboratory work.

Topic for Spring 2019: Origin of Dogs
This advanced seminar examines the current evidence for the domestication of dogs. The course draws on paleontological, archaeological, and genetic evidence for how and where dogs were first domesticated. The seminar includes the study of cultural and archaeological evidence for uses and treatment of dogs in different societies, including modern uses for service and law enforcement.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 120 and junior standing or consent of instructor

ANTH 522: Topics in Museum Studies

An examination of a particular topic in contemporary museum studies, focused on anthropological collections and museums. The specific topic investigated changes each year. Students are expected to carry out independent research on the topic, either through a review of relevant literature or through field or laboratory work. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 222

ANTH 530: Topics in Linguistic Anthropology

An examination of a particular topic in linguistic anthropology. The specific topic being investigated will change from year to year. Students are expected to do advance reading and independent research. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 532
Prerequisite: ANTH 330, ANTH 331, or LING 325 and junior standing, or consent of instructor

ANTH 531: Semiotics

Semiotics is the study of signs, symbols, and signification in social life. This course will cover semiotic theory, including theorists such as Saussure, Peirce, Jakobson, Lévi-Strauss, Barthes, and Bakhtin, and the application of semiotics to the study of language and social life, conducted through lectures and seminar-style discussions.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 531
Prerequisite: ANTH 330/LING 330 or ANTH 331

ANTH 540: Topics in Biological Anthropology

An examination of a particular topic in contemporary biological anthropological research. The specific topic investigated changes each year. Students are expected to carry out independent research on the topic, either through a review of relevant literature or through field or laboratory work. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2019: Fossil Humans
This advanced seminar studies the current evidence about human evolutionary history. Students will critically read and workshop scientific literature of hominin evolution while examining fossil casts. This course covers all widely recognized fossil species starting from the earliest dated controversial hominin finds. Other topics include paleoanthropological methods, models for the evolution of bipedalism, paradigms in paleoanthropology, and professional politics that inform research and analyses.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 140 and one other course in anthropology; or BIOL 150 and instructor's consent; and junior or senior standing

ANTH 542: Anthropology and Public Health

This advanced discussion seminar considers applied critical medical anthropology's contributions, in terms of theory, research, and practice, to addressing community and global health concerns. With a political-economic framework, we will focus on the social determinants of health and how both macrostructural forces and local conditions have to be considered for effective health development. Reading response papers, final research paper and presentation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 342 or ANTH 340, and junior or senior standing

ANTH 552: Disability and Culture

Disability is a social and lived category fundamental to human experience. This advanced discussion seminar draws from experiential, reflexive, phenomenological, and critical approaches in cultural and medical anthropology to cross-culturally explore the subjectivities of perceived disabilities in both local and global worlds. Topics may include: autism, learning disabilities, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, chronic pain, d/Deaf culture, and other categories of social impairment. Papers, research paper and presentation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 342, and junior or senior standing

ANTH 580: Topics in Neuroscience

A study of the nervous system from the perspectives of psychology, biology, and/or biological anthropology. Topics vary year to year and may include glial cells, neural development, and the evolution of nervous systems, and neurotransmitter systems. Lecture only. May be repeated with consent of instructor.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 116 and either BIOL 140 and one course in psychology, or PSYC 360 and one course in biology; or consent of instructor

ANTH 590: Tutorial Studies in Anthropology

Advanced study of selected topics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 591: Directed Study in Anthropology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 595: Internship in Anthropology

Applied work in anthropology arranged and carried out under the direction of an instructor. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 599: Independent Study in Anthropology

Advanced research. Students considering an honors project should register for this course, for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 601: Research Design in Anthropology

An introduction to designing a research project in anthropology. Students will build a conceptual model and design both data collection protocols and analysis strategies that will address the research question they developed in ANTH 501. Seminar meetings will be spent discussing problems and issues raised by individual students’ projects.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 501 and senior standing or consent of instructor.

ANTH 690: Tutorial Studies in Anthropology

Advanced study of selected topics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 691: Directed Study in Anthropology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 695: Internship in Anthropology

Applied work in anthropology arranged and carried out under the direction of an instructor. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 699: Independent Study in Anthropology

Advanced research. Students considering an honors project should register for this course, for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

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