Course Catalog
2015-2016

2015-2016 Course Catalog

Period: 2017-20182016-20172015-20162014-20152013-2014

This catalog was created on Sunday, August 19, 2018.


Table of Contents

About Lawrence

The Liberal Arts Education

Structure of the Curriculum

Academic Planning

Degree and General Education Requirements

Divisions within the University

Lawrence University organizes its curricular programs and offerings into divisions that are further described in the degree requirements. The divisions are as follows:

  • Humanities: Chinese, Classics, English, French and Francophone Studies, German, History, Japanese, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Russian and Spanish.
  • Natural sciences: Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics and Computer Science and Physics.
  • Social sciences: Anthropology, Economics, Education Studies, Government, and Psychology.
  • Fine arts: Art and Art History, Music and Theatre Arts.

Interdisciplinary programs, such as Biomedical Ethics, East Asian Studies, Environmental Studies, Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies and Linguistics are usually non-divisional. However, such non-divisional courses, as well as education and university courses may be assigned divisional affiliations when appropriate.

Residence Requirements

To qualify for a Lawrence University B.A. or B.Mus. degree, students are required to have a minimum of six terms in residence and earn 108 units (Lawrence foreign study programs, Associated Colleges of the Midwest programs, and other special arrangements under Lawrence sponsorship included). Nine terms in residence and 162 units are required for the five-year B.A. and B.Mus. double-degree program.

Students must be in residence on the Appleton campus until they have completed the Freshman Studies requirement.

The last three terms of work and a minimum of 54 units submitted for the graduation requirements must be done in residence unless a department (or departments, or advisory committee, where appropriate) previously has certified completion of the requirements for a major. This requirement, or one of its parts, may be waived by the admissions office in the case of incoming transfer students or by the Faculty Subcommittee on Administration in any other cases.

Bachelor of Arts Degree

Students seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree will complete approximately one-third of their work in each of three areas: Freshman Studies and General Education, a major, and elective study. The Freshman Studies and General Education Requirements are designed to promote the breadth of study central to a liberal arts education, perspective on issues critical to a diverse America and an interconnected world, and the development of skills essential for success in any discipline or profession. The completion of a major provides focused, in-depth work in a single discipline. Elective study affords students opportunities to develop secondary interests, work in areas complementary to their primary discipline, or explore new fields of study.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

  1. Completion of 216 units. Of the 216 units required for the degree, a student must present:
    1. a minimum of 72 units from courses numbered 200 or above
    2. no more than 162 units from a single division
    3. no more than 90 units from a single department, except that in the art department a student may present no more than 126 units, no more than 90 of which may be in studio art and no more than 90 of which may be in art history.
    4. no more than 42 units in education
    5. no more than 12 units from academic internships
  2. In the freshman year, 12 units of Freshman Studies
  3. Completion of the General Education Requirements:
    1. Distribution, in order to gain exposure to a range of disciplines, subjects, and perspectives within the liberal arts:
      1. 6 units selected from departments and courses listed within the Division of Humanities. All courses in the Humanities taught in English will count toward this requirement. Humanities courses taught in a foreign language and numbered 300 and above will count toward this requirement, except as noted in the course catalog.
      2. 6 units selected from departments and courses listed within the Division of Fine Arts;
      3. 6 units selected from departments and courses listed within the Division of Social Sciences;
      4. 6 units selected from laboratory courses in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics in the Division of Natural Sciences.
      See Distribution: divisions within the university.
    2. Diversity, in order to prepare students for a more global world and a more diverse America:
      1. 6 units selected from courses designated as either emphasizing global and comparative perspectives on the world or focusing on areas outside Europe and the United States;
      2. 6 units selected from courses designated as focusing on dimensions of diversity, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, that are of particular importance in understanding contemporary society in the United States.
    3. Competency, in order to improve and reinforce those fundamental abilities central to a liberal arts education:
      1. 6 units selected from courses designated as writing intensive or 6 units selected from courses designated as speaking intensive;
      2. 6 units selected from courses designated as emphasizing mathematical reasoning or quantitative analysis;
      3. 6 units in a foreign language taken from courses numbered 200 or above and taught primarily in a language other than English. This requirement may also be satisfied by attaining a score of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement examination in a foreign language or by passing a proficiency examination administered by a Lawrence University foreign language department.

    Stipulations Pertaining to the General Education Requirements

    Qualified courses may count toward the requirements in any two of the categories above (distribution, diversity, and competency). Some courses may meet two requirements within a category. No single course can be used to fulfill more than two requirements.
     
    Credits granted pursuant to university policy for examinations (Lawrence Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or A-levels) may be used as appropriate to fulfill diversity or competency requirements only (see also Evaluation of Credit for Transfer Students).
  4. Completion of a major — departmental, interdisciplinary, or student-designed — including all course and non-course requirements, such as departmental examinations, research projects and presentations, portfolios, etc. Students are required to declare a major by the beginning of the junior year.
  5. Completion of the designated Senior Experience course or activity within the chosen major.
  6. An academic record that meets the following standards:
    1. A 2.000 grade-point average in all Lawrence courses.
    2. A 2.000 grade-point average in the college major (all courses taken in the major department and any required courses outside the major department).
  7. Completion of the required terms and units in residence as specified by the university residence requirements.

Bachelor of Music Degree

The Bachelor of Music is a professional degree. Courses in music represent approximately two-thirds of the curriculum, while one-third is devoted to Freshman Studies and General Education Requirements.

In addition to academic policies and regulations, students in the conservatory are subject to policies and procedures detailed in conservatory department guidelines and the Conservatory Student Handbook.

Admission to the Degree

An entrance audition is required of all applicants for admission to the Bachelor of Music degree. Bachelor of Arts students who wish to become Bachelor of Music students must petition the Conservatory Committee on Administration for admission. Bachelor of Music students who wish to become Bachelor of Arts students must petition the University Faculty Subcommittee on Administration for acceptance into the Bachelor of Arts degree program. Such changes are not normally allowed before the end of the freshman year nor later than the beginning of the junior year.

Degree Requirements

  1. Completion of a minimum of 216 units. The following music courses are used in the computation of the degree grade-point average but are excluded from the total of 216 units required for the degree: MURP 201, 202, 203, 301, 302 and MUTH 161, 162, 171, 172.
  2. Of the 216 units required to complete the degree, a student must present:
    1. a minimum of 144 units in music
    2. a minimum of 60 units in courses other than music.
    3. no more than 12 units from academic internships
    The additional 12 units may be selected from any department.
  3. In the freshman year, 12 units of Freshman Studies.
  4. Completion of the General Education Requirements:
    1. 6 units selected from courses designated as writing intensive
    2. International diversity. One of the following:
      1. 6 units selected from courses designated as either emphasizing global and comparative perspectives on the world or focusing on areas outside Europe and the United States
      2. 12 units selected from courses numbered below 200 in a single foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by attaining a score of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement examination or by passing a proficiency examination administered by a Lawrence University foreign language department.
      3. Participation for one term in a Lawrence or affiliated off-campus study program held outside the United States
    Note: While some music courses may satisfy General Education Requirements, a minimum of 60 units in courses other than music is required for the degree.

    Stipulations Pertaining to the General Education Requirements

    A single course may be used to satisfy both requirement a. and requirement b. above. Credits granted pursuant to university policy for advanced placement or for transfer work may be used to fulfill General Education Requirement (see also Evaluation of Credit for Transfer Students).
  5. Completion of music core requirements:
    1. Music theory
      1. MUTH 151, 161, 171 or MUTH 201, 211, 221
      2. MUTH 152, 162, 172 or MUTH 202, 212, 222
      3. MUTH 251, 261, and 271
      4. MUTH 252, 262, and 272
      5. MUTH 301, 311, and 321
    2. Musicology
      1. MUCO 201 and 202
      2. 12 units selected from courses in musicology numbered 400 or above
    3. Keyboard skills: MURP 201, 202, 203 or MURP 301, 302
    4. Applied music individual instruction as specified under requirements for the major and areas of emphasis
    5. Ensemble study: a minimum of 12 units. Students are required to participate in an ensemble every term in which they are attending classes on the Appleton campus. Requirements for specific types of ensemble study (MUEN) are specified under requirements for majors and areas of emphasis.
  6. Completion of a major in music — performance, music education, theory/composition, or student-designed — including all course and non-course requirements, such as recitals, qualifying examinations, etc.
  7. An academic record that meets the following standards:
    1. A 2.000 grade-point average in all Lawrence courses.
    2. A 2.000 grade-point average in the music major (all music courses and non-music courses required for the major) unless otherwise specified under the major requirements.
  8. Completion of required terms and units in residence as specified by the residence requirements.

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Music Degree

Professional study in music and study in the liberal arts may be combined in a five-year program leading to both Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Arts degrees, the latter with a major other than music. Both degrees are awarded at the conclusion of the five-year program. Interested students should discuss this possibility with their advisors as early as possible.

Approximately half of the curriculum is devoted to the study of music — completion of the music core and requirements for a major in performance, music education, or theory/composition. The other half of the curriculum mirrors that of the Bachelor of Arts program, emphasizing breadth of study central to a liberal arts education, focused study in the college major, and elective study to complement other work or explore other fields of interest.

Certain majors in the Bachelor of Arts degree program (for example, some laboratory sciences) may be difficult to combine with the Bachelor of Music degree program into a five-year double-degree program, especially if the student’s objective is to maintain serious options for graduate or professional work in both areas after graduation. Such combinations may require that course overloads be taken to complete minimum requirements in each major in a timely and satisfactory manner. Early and regular consultation with advisors in both the college and the conservatory is imperative. Further, students who seek certification for purposes of teaching a subject other than music are urged to see the associate dean of the conservatory.

In addition to academic policies and regulations, students in the conservatory are subject to policies and procedures detailed in conservatory department guidelines and the Conservatory Student Handbook.

Requirements for the five-year Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Music Degrees

  1. Completion of a minimum of 15 terms of study and 270 units. Of the 270 units required, a student must present:
    1. a minimum of 144 units in music, exclusive of MURP 201, 202, 203, 301, 302 and MUTH 161, 162, 171, 172
    2. a minimum of 114 units selected from courses other than music
    3. no more than 42 units from courses in education
    4. a minimum of 72 units from courses numbered 200 and above
    5. no more than 90 units from a single department outside of music, except that in the art department a student may present no more than 126 units, no more than 90 of which may be in art and no more than 90 of which may be in art history
    6. no more than 12 units from academic internships
  2. In the freshman year, 12 units of Freshman Studies.
  3. Completion of the General Education Requirements:
    1. Distribution, in order to gain exposure to a range of disciplines, subjects, and perspectives within the liberal arts:
      1. 6 units selected from departments and courses listed within the Division of Humanities. All courses in the humanities taught in English will count toward this requirement. Humanities courses taught in a foreign language and numbered 300 and above also will count toward this requirement, except as noted in the course catalog.
      2. 6 units selected from departments and courses listed within the Division of Fine Arts;
      3. 6 units selected from departments and courses listed within the Division of Social Sciences;
      4. 6 units selected from laboratory courses in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics in the Division of Natural Sciences
    2. Diversity, in order to prepare students for a more global world and a more diverse America:
      1. 6 units selected from courses designated as either emphasizing global and comparative perspectives on the world or focusing on areas outside Europe and the United States;
      2. 6 units selected from courses designated as focusing on dimensions of diversity, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, that are of particular importance in understanding contemporary society in the United States.
    3. Competency, in order to improve and reinforce those fundamental abilities central to a liberal arts education:
      1. 6 units selected from courses designated as writing intensive or 6 units selected from courses designated as speaking intensive;
      2. 6 units selected from courses designated as emphasizing mathematical reasoning or quantitative analysis;
      3. 6 units in a foreign language taken from courses numbered 200 or above and taught primarily in a language other than English. This requirement may also be satisfied by attaining a score of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement examination in a foreign language or by passing a proficiency examination administered by a Lawrence University foreign language department.

    Stipulations pertaining to the General Education Requirements

    Qualified courses may count toward the requirements in any two of the categories above (distribution, diversity, and competency). Some courses may meet two requirements within a category. No single course can be used to fulfill more than two requirements. Credits granted pursuant to university policy for examinations (Lawrence Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or A-levels) may be used as appropriate to fulfill diversity or competency requirements only.
  4. Completion of a college major — departmental, interdisciplinary, or student-designed — exclusive of music, including all course and non-course requirements, such as departmental examinations, research projects and presentations, portfolios, etc. Students are required to declare a major by the beginning of the junior year.
  5. Completion of music core requirements:
    1. Music Theory
      1. MUTH 151, 161, 171 or MUTH 201, 211, 221
      2. MUTH 152, 162, 172 or MUTH 202, 212, 222
      3. MUTH 251, 261, and 271
      4. MUTH 252, 262, and 272
      5. MUTH 301, 311, and 321
    2. Musicology
      1. MUCO 201 and 202
      2. 12 units selected from courses in musicology numbered 400 or above
    3. Keyboard skills: MURP 201, 202, 203 or MURP 301, 302
    4. Applied music individual instruction as specified under requirements for the major and areas of emphasis
    5. Ensemble study: a minimum of 12 units. Students are required to participate in an ensemble every term in which they are attending classes on the Appleton campus. Requirements for specific types of ensemble study (MUEN) are specified under requirements for majors and areas of emphasis.
    6. Completion of a major in music — performance, music education, theory/composition, or student-designed — including all course and non-course requirements, such as recitals, qualifying examinations, etc.
    7. Completion of a designated Senior Experience course or activity within the chosen majors for each degree.
    8. An academic record that meets the following standards:
      1. A 2.000 grade-point average in all Lawrence courses.
      2. A 2.000 grade-point average in the music major (all music courses and non-music courses required for the major) unless otherwise specified under the major requirements.
    9. Completion of required terms and units in residence as specified by the university residence requirements

Cooperative Programs

A liberal arts education provides excellent preparation for careers in a variety of professions. For this reason, several professional schools have contracted with Lawrence for cooperative programs that enable students to build a foundation in the liberal arts and then acquire specific professional skills. These programs lead, in most cases, to the awarding of two degrees.

The Lawrence cooperative programs listed below generally provide for students to study at Lawrence for three years and then transfer to a professional school for two more years. To qualify for a Lawrence degree in these programs, students must earn 162 units and fulfill all other degree requirements that cannot be met in the professional school. Students must undertake careful planning with the professional advisors and with their own faculty advisors to make sure all requirements will be completed satisfactorily.

Engineering

Program advisor: J. Collett
Students wishing to combine a liberal arts program with professional training in engineering or computer science may want to choose the 3-2 program in engineering, which involves three years of study at Lawrence University and two years of study at an engineering school. Lawrence has formal affiliations with Columbia University (New York, New York), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, New York), and Washington University (St. Louis, Missouri), but students may transfer to any accredited engineering school with the agreement of the chosen institution. Upon satisfactory completion of the five-year program, these students will receive the Bachelor of Arts degree from Lawrence as well as a Bachelor of Engineering degree from the professional school they have attended. To prepare for the transfer to an engineering school, students must include among their courses basic mathematics (normally MATH 140, 150, 160, and 210), computer science (CMSC 110 or 150), introductory chemistry (CHEM 115 and 116), introductory physics with calculus (PHYS 141 & 151, or 151 &160), and six courses (36 units) in humanities and social sciences. Many of these courses also will figure in the student’s major at Lawrence. Because specific requirements vary slightly among the engineering schools, students contemplating the 3-2 program should consult early with the program advisor.

Forestry and Environmental Studies

Program advisor: B. De Stasio
The college offers a cooperative program with Duke University in the areas of environmental science and forestry. Upon satisfactory completion of this five-year program, spending three years at Lawrence and two at Duke’s School of the Environment, the student will receive the B.A. degree from Lawrence and the professional degree Master of Forestry or Master of Environmental Management from Duke.

The major emphases at Duke are in forest resource production, resource ecology, resource policy and economics, water and air resources, and ecotoxicology. An undergraduate major in natural sciences, social sciences, or pre-engineering is good preparation for the programs at Duke, but a student with any undergraduate concentration will be considered for admission. The student must complete a total of 48 units at Duke, which generally takes four semesters. The student must complete 162 units at Lawrence and fulfill all other requirements that cannot be completed at Duke. All students contemplating this cooperative program should plan to take work in ecology, economics, and statistics at Lawrence before matriculating at Duke.

Some students may prefer to complete the bachelor’s degree before undertaking graduate study at Duke. The master’s degree requirements for these students are the same as those for students entering after the junior year, but the 48-unit requirements may be reduced for relevant, already completed undergraduate work of satisfactory quality. All credit reductions are determined individually and consider both the student’s educational background and objectives.

Occupational Therapy

Program advisor: G. Metalsky
Lawrence offers a 3-2 program in occupational therapy in conjunction with the School of Medicine of Washington University, St. Louis. Students spend three years of study at Lawrence and then continue for five semesters and two summers in the occupational therapy program at Washington University. After two semesters of successful study at Washington University, Lawrence awards the Bachelor of Arts degree. The student then continues for three more semesters and two summers at Washington University to earn the Master of Science in Occupational Therapy degree. Students who complete this program are prepared to address the prevention and treatment of physical or mental dysfunctions that impair people’s abilities to perform activities of daily life. Occupational therapists focus on the methods that permit individuals to engage in meaningful life activities. They also assist in modifying environments that make it possible for individuals to function at home, at work, and in the community.

Lawrence students apply to the occupational therapy program of the School of Medicine, Washington University during the fall of the junior year and must meet the entrance requirements established by the occupational therapy program. The Washington University School of Medicine is one of the finest in the country, and the occupational therapy program is competitive. A 3.000 Lawrence grade-point average is a minimum requirement but does not guarantee admission. Students who are admitted may apply for financial aid provided by Washington University.

To complete the occupational therapy program, students must complete 162 units at Lawrence, meet General Education Requirements, and fulfill all requirements for a Lawrence major. Students also must fulfill the prerequisite course requirements for occupational therapy, as follows: BIOL 110, 140, and 242; one additional biology course (6 units) numbered 200 or above; one additional science course (6 units) chosen from physics, chemistry, biology, or neuroscience; PSYC 250 and 260; one course (6 units) chosen from among PHIL 100, PHIL 120, PHIL 320, PHIL 440, ECON 290, or GOV 495; two additional courses (12 units) chosen from the social sciences; and MATH 107. Completing Lawrence requirements and the prerequisite requirements will require careful planning, which must begin early in the Lawrence career. Students interested in this program should talk with their faculty advisors not later than the beginning of the sophomore year. Students should coordinate their plans with Students should coordinate their plans with the program advisor as well.

Anthropology

Professor:P. Peregrine
Associate professors:C. Daughtry, B. Jenike (Edward F. Mielke Professor of Ethics in Medicine, Science and Society), M. Jenike (chair)
Assistant professor:L. Murali (on leave term(s) I)
Visiting assistant professor:D. Proctor

Anthropology is the study of humanity in all its cultural, biological, linguistic, and historical diversity. A synthesis of scientific and humanistic concerns and methods, it attempts to distinguish universal human characteristics from those unique to individual social groups, and to understand the reasons for differences between individuals and groups.

The insights of anthropology are essential for a critical understanding of the problems of the contemporary world. Anthropology informs a public confronted with choices to be made with respect to changing value systems; competing social goals; ethnic, religious, class, gender, and race relations; new and emerging technologies; environmental and cultural resources management; changing paradigms of health, wellness, and disease; linguistic diversity; and international relations.

Anthropology offers both unique theoretical perspectives and a particular set of methodological approaches. The faculty considers it essential that we educate our students in both. Students should take away from their studies a substantive knowledge of the commonalities and differences in human experiences and also an understanding of how that knowledge is obtained and evaluated.

The anthropology major thus prepares students for successful entry into any number of professional and graduate programs, as well as careers that require a multicultural approach and perspective. Our mission is to represent anthropology appropriately at Lawrence and in the wider communities within which we live and work, and to educate others wherever and whenever possible with the insights that anthropology has to offer.

The anthropology department at Lawrence includes a range of courses and opportunities for guided independent study from the complementary perspectives of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and ethnology. Faculty members provide expertise in a number of ethnographic areas, including North and West Africa, India, East Asia, the Middle East, and North America. Topical interests include cultural evolution, refugee communities, medical anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and biological anthropology. The department maintains two well-equipped laboratories, as well as collections of archaeological and ethnographic materials from many culture areas. The department also provides equipment for audio and video data collection and transcription to support research in the cultural and linguistic anthropology subfields.

Required for the anthropology major

  1. ANTH 110: Cultural Anthropology
    ANTH 120: World Prehistory
    ANTH 140: Biological Anthropology
  2. ANTH 200: History of Anthropological Ideas
    ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology
    ANTH 210: Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology
    Students are expected to complete these courses during their sophomore year and no later than the end of their junior year.
  3. ANTH 501: Research Questions in Anthropology
    ANTH 601: Research Design in Anthropology
  4. Four six-unit elective courses in anthropology, including at least one upper-division seminar (courses numbered in the 500s). (Anthropology majors are urged to take several of these seminars in their junior and senior years.)

Required for the anthropology major: archaeology track

  1. ANTH 110: Cultural Anthropology
    ANTH 120: World Prehistory
    ANTH 140: Biological Anthropology
  2. ANTH 200: History of Anthropological Ideas
    ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology
    ANTH 220: Research Methods in Archaeology or another approved field experience.
    ANTH 222: Historic Preservation Theory and Practice
  3. Six units of ANTH 422: Archaeological Collections Management
  4. ANTH 501: Research Questions in Anthropology
    ANTH 601: Research Design in Anthropology
  5. Three six-unit elective courses in anthropology, including ANTH 520: Topics in Archaeology.

Required for the anthropology major: biological anthropology track

  1. ANTH 110: Cultural Anthropology
    ANTH 120: World Prehistory
    ANTH 140: Biological Anthropology
    BIOL 130: Integrative Biology: Cells to Organisms
    BIOL 150: Integrative Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems
  2. ANTH 200: History of Anthropological Ideas
    ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology or BIOL 170: Integrative Biology: Experimental Design and Analysis ANTH 210 is recommended for students pursuing an interest in biocultural anthropology via the biological anthropology track. Students are expected to complete these courses during their sophomore year and no later than the end of their junior year.
  3. ANTH 501: Research Questions in Anthropology
    ANTH 601: Research Design in Anthropology
  4. Three six-unit elective courses in anthropology, including ANTH 540: Topics in Biological Anthropology.
  5. Three six-unit courses in biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics, or physics, at least two of which must be biology courses numbered 200 or above and at least one of which must be a laboratory course.

Required for the anthropology minor

  1. Two of the following courses:
    ANTH 110: Cultural Anthropology
    ANTH 120: World Prehistory
    ANTH 140: Biological Anthropology
  2. Three six-unit electives in anthropology, selected from courses numbered 200 and above, except ANTH 501 or 601
  3. One six-unit upper-division seminar (courses numbered in the 500s)
  4. C average in the minor

Senior Experience in Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology's Senior Experience is a two course sequence which marks the culmination of a four-year series of core courses designed to develop the student's abilities to reason and practice as an anthropologist. Students begin their study of anthropology with a three-course introductory sequence, and move on in their sophomore year to a three-course theory and methods sequence. After further exploration of their specific interests within anthropology through elective courses and off-campus study, students continue their development with ANTH 501, which introduces them to the process of formulating research questions. In their senior year students take ANTH 601, which provides students the opportunity to reflect upon and synthesize what they have learned in the anthropology program by designing a focused research project. These projects are presented to the anthropology faculty and student majors during a formal symposium at the end of the Winter Term.

Courses - Anthropology

ANTH 110: Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the nature of culture, the organization of social relations, and the relationships between values and behavior. Attention to language, kinship, and religion as cultural systems, as well as to forms of social control, stratification and inequality in relation to culture (including gender, race, ethnicity, and class). Social patterns and processes within and across cultures examined through ethnographic cases studies from around the world.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing; consent of instructor required for juniors and seniors

ANTH 120: World Prehistory

An introduction to the peoples and cultures of the world from 40,000 years ago to 2,000 years ago. Major events in world prehistory, such as the origins of agriculture, the rise of cities, and the spread of states, are examined and discussed. General trends in cultural evolution are proposed and evaluated. This course may not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing; consent of instructor required for juniors and seniors

ANTH 140: Biological Anthropology

The study of humans as biological organisms. Topics addressed include processes of evolutionary change and stasis; primate diversity, ecology, and behavior; morphological, ecological, and genetic perspectives on human evolution; and contemporary human biological variation, including racial variation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing; consent of instructor required for juniors and seniors

ANTH 191: Directed Study in Anthropology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 195: Internship in Anthropology

Applied work in anthropology arranged and carried out under the direction of an instructor. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 200: History of Anthropological Ideas

A study of the development of anthropology as a scholarly discipline and a method of inquiry. Consideration of theoretical perspectives such as evolutionism, historical particularism, functionalism, cultural materialism, structuralism, interpretive and postmodernist approaches, and also the significance of participant-observation and other field research strategies in shaping anthropological knowledge.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110, 120, or 140, preferably all three. Recommended for anthropology majors in the sophomore year; must be completed by the end of the junior year.

ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology

An introduction to the collection and manipulation of quantitative data in anthropological research. Topics include sampling, measurement, and basic nominal and ordinal statistics.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110, 120, or 140, preferably all three. Recommended for anthropology majors in the sophomore year; must be completed by the end of the junior year.

ANTH 210: Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to basic assumptions and methods of research in sociocultural anthropology, including participant observation, ethnographic interview, focus groups, cognitive methods, survey, and census. Students gain hands-on experience in research.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110, 120, or 140, preferably all three. Recommended for anthropology majors in the sophomore year; must be completed by the end of the junior year.

ANTH 220: Research Methods in Archaeology

Presents the research process in archaeology and offers an overview of essential data-collection and analysis techniques, including site survey and excavation, settlement pattern analysis, lithic analysis, and ceramic analysis. Students will take part in field research. When this course is scheduled at 8-noon TR, class will dismiss early for scheduled convocations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 260
Prerequisite: ANTH 120

ANTH 222: Historic Preservation Theory and Practice

Historic preservation endeavors to identify and conserve historic objects, properties, and landscapes. It has become a focal task for many anthropologists today. This course introduces students to the basic theory of historic preservation, the laws guiding practice, and the techniques used by historic preservation professionals.
Units: 6.

ANTH 306: Anthropology of Gender

An anthropological approach to the study of gender and a/sexuality, and how they intersect with other dimensions of social difference such as race, class, and ethnicity. Topical, ethnographic approach to examining these intersections. Focus on issues such as sexual behavior, reproduction, parenting, transgender identity, work, communication, and violence.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 350
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or GEST 100

ANTH 310: Ecological Anthropology

A study of relationships between human communities and their natural environments (i.e., humans studied as members of ecosystems). Topics include the interactions between environment, human biology, and social organization and anthropological perspectives on global environmental problems.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 365
Prerequisite: One anthropology course or consent of instructor

ANTH 312: Economic Anthroplogy

An introduction to the theories, concepts and methods of economic anthropology, focusing on the relationship between socioeconomic lives and social power structures. Explores how people engage with economic choices, decisions, and risk from an anthropological perspective. Topics include morality, rationality, value, exchange, debt, work, globalization, poverty and wealth, power.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110

ANTH 320: Archaeology of Gender

An examination of the relationship between gender and material culture. Focus on how gender and gender roles are reflected in the archaeological record and on the problems in identifying and determining gender roles in prehistory. Readings include studies from both the Old and New Worlds and modern theoretical approaches.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 351
Prerequisite: One anthropology course or consent of instructor

ANTH 322: Archaeology of North America

An introduction to the ancient peoples of North America from the initial colonists to the peoples who encountered European colonists some 13,000 years later. Special emphasis is given to the ancient inhabitants of the Great Lakes region.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 120

ANTH 324: Archaeology of Prehistoric Greece

A study of archaeological investigations in the Aegean region — Greece, Crete, the Cycladic Islands, and western Turkey. Emphasis on the evidence of cultural development from Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers and herders through the development of the Bronze Age “palace” civilizations of the Minoans and Mycenaeans.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Classics 365
Prerequisite: ANTH 120 or consent of instructor

ANTH 326: Bizarrchaeology

Much of the public’s interest in archaeology focuses on “mysteries” of the past or allegedly “unexplainable” phenomena. Since the past is largely impossible to know, it is easy to uncritically fill it with products of the imagination rather than products of ancient peoples. This course examines some of these “imaginary” pasts and the practice of creating them.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 120

ANTH 328: Ethics in Archaeology: Who owns the past?

An exploration of ethical and legal concerns surrounding archaeology: the ownership and treatment of archaeological remains and relations between archaeologists and descendent communities. Topics include the ethics and legality of collecting looting, and the antiquities market; archaeology and nationalism; repatriation of skeletons and artifacts; and professional responsibilities of archaeologists.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 325, Classics 368
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ANTH 120, an ARHI course (preferably ancient to Renaissance), or consent of instructor

ANTH 330: Language and Culture

An introduction to the core concepts of linguistic anthropology, definitions of language, basic methods of linguistic anthropology (observation, transcription, analysis, ethnography), power and language, language discrimination, and language ideology theory. Lectures, discussions, and labs.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 330
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or LING 150

ANTH 331: Introduction to Sociolinguistics

This course presents an introduction to sociolinguistics, a discipline within linguistics concerned with the systematic investigation of language in relation to the social world. Topics include language variation and change, social identity and language use, linguistic diversity, and language ideologies. We will also practice methods for collecting and analyzing sociolinguistic data.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 325
Prerequisite: LING 150 or ANTH 110

ANTH 340: Human Biology, Evolution, and Health

Students will develop an understanding of modern human biology as the outcome of interactions between evolved genomes and the myriad environments in which we are born, develop and live out our lives. Topics of study will include evolutionary approaches to reproduction, growth and development, health, behavior, adaptation, and life history.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 140, BIOL 150, or consent of instructor

ANTH 341: Human Variation

A survey of human biological variation and adaptation. Topics include the geographic distribution of human variation; evolutionary approaches to understanding human diversity; historic and modern concepts of race and ethnicity; human biological adaptations to disease, climate, poverty, and other stressors; and the genetics of simple and complex traits.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 341
Prerequisite: ANTH 140, BIOL 110, or consent of instructor

ANTH 342: Medical Anthropology

An introduction to the comparative, cross-cultural study of health, healing, and beliefs about the body and illness. Topics covered include: (1) biocultural approaches to understanding health; (2) social determinants of health (how social inequalities become embodied); (3) medical systems, including biomedicine, as cultural systems of knowledge and practice; (4) the social construction of illness and health; and (5) an introduction to global health.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, and ANTH 110 or 140

ANTH 344: Nutritional Anthropology

This course provides a basic introduction to human nutrition. It then considers the evolution of human nutrition through the study of primate nutrition and the putative diets of human ancestors. Finally, it considers anthropological approaches to understanding cross-cultural, intracultural, and life-cycle variation in modern human nutrition.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 140 or consent of instructor

ANTH 345: Distributed Cognition and the Extended Mind

The new science of the mind treats cognition as a distributed process involving the brain, body, and world. This seminar explores the role of material settings and tools, bodily engagement, social interaction, and cultural processes in human reasoning, problem solving, and learning. Students will write short papers examining aspects of cognitive activity in real-world settings.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Education Studies 345, Psychology 345
Prerequisite: PHIL 105 recommended

ANTH 347: Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

This course is an introduction to forensic anthropology and human osteology, including a comprehensive study of the human skeleton and sections on determining ancestry, sex, and age of a skeleton. Further topics include how to approach a crime scene, determining forensic significance, and the postmortem processes of the human body.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing required; ANTH 140 recommended

ANTH 348: Primate Behavior and Ecology

This course provides an introduction to the Order Primates. In addition to exploring the behavior and ecology of prosimians, monkeys, and apes, the course will cover techniques in primate behavioral observation. Further, biological and social adaptations will be examined in an evolutionary context.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and one of the following: ANTH 140, BIOL 140, BIOL 150, consent of instructor

ANTH 350: Indians of North America

A cultural study of the Indians of North America, including examination of the impact of European ideas and technology on Indian societies. Emphasis on environmental adaptations, levels of social and cultural complexity, problems of historical interpretation, and the methods and theories of ethnology and their applications to North American cultures.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 330
Prerequisite: ANTH 110

ANTH 353: Reading Ethnography

This seminar explores ethnography as the defining feature of cultural anthropology. Reading a range of articles and booklength works, students survey several ethnographic genres including classic realist, experimental, narrative, self-reflexive, and critical ethnography. Students also gain experience leading discussion and delivering oral reports and presentations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

ANTH 358: Ethnography of the Middle East and North Africa

Introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, an area of tremendous cultural, religious, linguistic, and economic diversity. Focus on the nature of ethnography as a research method and key areas of inquiry that have concerned anthropologists working in Arab and Muslim societies. Topics include social organization, tribalism, colonialism, gender, religion, nationalism, ethnic and religious minorities, and the politics of identity.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 332
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor

ANTH 360: Anthropology of South Asia

Introduces the complexity of South Asian society and culture through the study of ethnographies of gender, religious life, kinship, social organization, and economy in the colonial and post-colonial periods.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 335
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor

ANTH 364: Ethnography of East Asia

A critical and comparative examination of key areas of sociocultural change in present-day East Asia. Focusing on China, we address new areas of research in East Asian anthropology such as demographic change, modernization, urbanization and stratification, gender and the body politic, sexuality, pop culture, consumption, ethnic minorities and national cultural identities.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 364
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

ANTH 366: Ethnography of Japan

Critical examination of social and cultural (re)presentations of Japan from the postwar to the postmodern. Exploration of diversities of lived reality and social change in contemporary Japan. Topics include: national cultural identity, historical consciousness, family and gender ideologies, the Heisei recession, invisible and visible others, demographic change, sexuality, pop culture, youth culture, multiculturalism, and recovery from calamity.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 366
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

ANTH 372: Urban Anthropology of London

This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

ANTH 374: Identity and Place: Diaspora Experience in Comparative Perspective

An exploration of similarities and differences in refugee/diaspora communities. Issues explored include relationships between place and identity, memory and identity, notions of home and homeland, gender and class, assimilation versus resistance, social and cultural changes induced by migration and the impact of transnationalism.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and one course in anthropology or consent of instructor

ANTH 377: Culture and Aging

This course uses ethnographic studies from non-Western and Western societies to understand how the experience of aging throughout the life course not only differs cross-culturally, but also within the same society over time in response to increased longevity and biomedical advances. Of particular concern will be cultural constructions of health, well-being, disability, and dependency, including in-depth analysis of aging in Asia.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

ANTH 378: Anthropology of Food

All humans must consume food in order to live, but how "food" is defined, produced, procured, and interacted with is subject to endless variation. This class examines how food becomes more than just sustenance: how food acts as a means of building identities, making meaning, organizing society, and exerting power.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor

ANTH 390: Tutorial Studies in Anthropology

Advanced study of selected topics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 391: Directed Study in Anthropology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 395: Internship in Anthropology

Applied work in anthropology arranged and carried out under the direction of an instructor. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 399: Independent Study in Anthropology

Advanced research. Students considering an honors project should register for this course, for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 401: Research Preparation in Anthropology

Students will develop advanced library research skills with a focus on anthropological resources and topics. Each student will write a thematic annotated bibliography based on library research, consider ethical implications of empirical research on the topic they have chosen, and formulate a plan for their senior experience foundation and independent study courses. This course will also explore career development for anthroplogy majors. Seminar.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 200 and junior or senior standing

ANTH 422: Practicum in Archaeological Collections Management

Applied work in all aspects of archaeological collections management from cleaning and conservation to cataloguing and storage. Students will work with Lawrence's existing archaeological collections and materials generated from ongoing field and laboratory research. Collection projects vary from term to term. Course may be repeated in subsequent terms for no more than a total of 6 units.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: ANTH 222

ANTH 430: Methods in Linguistic Anthropology

A hands-on introduction to advanced linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics methods and relevant theories. Will cover transcription, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, and narrative analysis. Classes will be a combination of labs, workshops, and seminars. Prerequisites are non-negotiable.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 430
Prerequisite: Junior standing, and ANTH 210, ANTH 330, or ANTH 331

ANTH 441: Anthropology of Medical Humanitarianism

This course draws upon global case studies of humanitarian intervention in order to encourage students to engage critically with the complexity of what seems like an unequivocal good: humanitarian aid. Through a variety of audiovisual materials, texts, and oral and written assignments, students will develop a strong critical appreciation of the global political economy of aid and of the ethical dilemmas that accompany lifesaving.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110

ANTH 450: Senegalese Culture

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks. Offered in alternate years.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 400
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

ANTH 500: Topics in Anthropology

An examination of a particular topic in contemporary anthropology. The specific topic investigated changes each year. Students are expected to carry out independent research on the topic, either through a review of relevant literature or through field or laboratory work.

Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and at least two courses in anthropology or consent of instructor

ANTH 512: Fictions of Africa

An exploration of African culture and history through literature and film by African authors/directors. Issues to be explored include African debates on colonialism, post-colonialism, gender, class, and ethnic stratification, religion, modernization and development. Fictional works will be discussed in tandem with ethnographic monographs and critical essays.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 512
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and at least two other courses in the social sciences

ANTH 520: Topics in Archaeology

An examination of a particular topic in contemporary archaeological research. The specific topic investigated changes each year. Students are expected to carry out independent research on the topic, either through a review of relevant literature or through field or laboratory work.

Topic for Spring 2019: Origin of Dogs
This advanced seminar examines the current evidence for the domestication of dogs. The course draws on paleontological, archaeological, and genetic evidence for how and where dogs were first domesticated. The seminar includes the study of cultural and archaeological evidence for uses and treatment of dogs in different societies, including modern uses for service and law enforcement.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 120 and junior standing or consent of instructor

ANTH 522: Topics in Museum Studies

An examination of a particular topic in contemporary museum studies, focused on anthropological collections and museums. The specific topic investigated changes each year. Students are expected to carry out independent research on the topic, either through a review of relevant literature or through field or laboratory work. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 222

ANTH 530: Topics in Linguistic Anthropology

An examination of a particular topic in linguistic anthropology. The specific topic being investigated will change from year to year. Students are expected to do advance reading and independent research. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 532
Prerequisite: ANTH 330, ANTH 331, or LING 325 and junior standing, or consent of instructor

ANTH 531: Semiotics

Semiotics is the study of signs, symbols, and signification in social life. This course will cover semiotic theory, including theorists such as Saussure, Peirce, Jakobson, Lévi-Strauss, Barthes, and Bakhtin, and the application of semiotics to the study of language and social life, conducted through lectures and seminar-style discussions.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 531
Prerequisite: ANTH 330/LING 330 or ANTH 331

ANTH 540: Topics in Biological Anthropology

An examination of a particular topic in contemporary biological anthropological research. The specific topic investigated changes each year. Students are expected to carry out independent research on the topic, either through a review of relevant literature or through field or laboratory work. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2019: Fossil Humans
This advanced seminar studies the current evidence about human evolutionary history. Students will critically read and workshop scientific literature of hominin evolution while examining fossil casts. This course covers all widely recognized fossil species starting from the earliest dated controversial hominin finds. Other topics include paleoanthropological methods, models for the evolution of bipedalism, paradigms in paleoanthropology, and professional politics that inform research and analyses.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 140 and one other course in anthropology; or BIOL 150 and instructor's consent; and junior or senior standing

ANTH 542: Anthropology and Public Health

This advanced discussion seminar considers applied critical medical anthropology's contributions, in terms of theory, research, and practice, to addressing community and global health concerns. With a political-economic framework, we will focus on the social determinants of health and how both macrostructural forces and local conditions have to be considered for effective health development. Reading response papers, final research paper and presentation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 342 or ANTH 340, and junior or senior standing

ANTH 552: Disability and Culture

Disability is a social and lived category fundamental to human experience. This advanced discussion seminar draws from experiential, reflexive, phenomenological, and critical approaches in cultural and medical anthropology to cross-culturally explore the subjectivities of perceived disabilities in both local and global worlds. Topics may include: autism, learning disabilities, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, chronic pain, d/Deaf culture, and other categories of social impairment. Papers, research paper and presentation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 342, and junior or senior standing

ANTH 580: Topics in Neuroscience

A study of the nervous system from the perspectives of psychology, biology, and/or biological anthropology. Topics vary year to year and may include glial cells, neural development, and the evolution of nervous systems, and neurotransmitter systems. Lecture only. May be repeated with consent of instructor.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 116 and either BIOL 140 and one course in psychology, or PSYC 360 and one course in biology; or consent of instructor

ANTH 590: Tutorial Studies in Anthropology

Advanced study of selected topics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 591: Directed Study in Anthropology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 595: Internship in Anthropology

Applied work in anthropology arranged and carried out under the direction of an instructor. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 599: Independent Study in Anthropology

Advanced research. Students considering an honors project should register for this course, for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 601: Research Design in Anthropology

An introduction to designing a research project in anthropology. Students will build a conceptual model and design both data collection protocols and analysis strategies that will address the research question they developed in ANTH 501. Seminar meetings will be spent discussing problems and issues raised by individual students’ projects.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ANTH 501 and senior standing or consent of instructor.

ANTH 690: Tutorial Studies in Anthropology

Advanced study of selected topics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 691: Directed Study in Anthropology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 695: Internship in Anthropology

Applied work in anthropology arranged and carried out under the direction of an instructor. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ANTH 699: Independent Study in Anthropology

Advanced research. Students considering an honors project should register for this course, for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Studio Art

Associate professors:R. Neilson (Frederick R. Layton Professor of Art Art and Art History), B. Rinehart (Art and Art History) (on leave term(s) III), J. Shimon (Art and Art History, chair)
Visiting assistant professor:T. Conrad (Art and Art History)
Instructor:M. Sullivan (Uihlein Fellow of Studio Art Art and Art History)

An integral part of a liberal arts curriculum, the courses of the art and art history department encourage aesthetic awareness and appreciation by emphasizing the interdependence of art-making, art history, and other creative and intellectual fields. A major is offered in either studio art or art history, and certification for teaching K-12 is available in conjunction with the studio art major. A student may complete a double major in studio art and art history by fulfilling the requirements for each major. Students planning to major in studio art and/ or art history should take the introductory 100-level courses required for the major in their freshman and sophomore years. Students may take a maximum of 126 units in the art and art history department, provided that no more than 90 are in either studio art or art history.

Required for the studio art major

  1. A minimum of nine studio art courses (54 units) to include:
    • ART 100 and 110
    • One two-dimensional and one three-dimensional course (6 units each) at the 200 level
    • At least four courses (24 units) numbered 300 or above, of which at least one (6 units) must be numbered 500 or above
    • ART 600: Senior Seminar
  2. A grouping of works in the senior exhibition
  3. Two Art History courses (12 units) to include:
    • ARHI 100 or 102
    • One ARHI course (6 units) with an emphasis on 20th century or contemporary art

Required for the studio art minor

  1. A minimum of six studio art courses (36 units) to include:
    • ART 100 and 110
    • One course (6 units) numbered 500 or above
    • Three additional courses (18 units)
  2. A grouping of works in the senior exhibition
  3. C average in the minor

Certification for teaching K-12

Studio art majors may enroll in a program for certification to teach art in grades K-12. Studio art course requirements for certification must be taken in conjunction with or in addition to the studio art major requirements. The required art courses for certification include ART 200, 240, 250, and 585 and ARHI 100 and 102.

It is highly recommended that studio majors planning for certification consider additional courses that expand their knowledge base of media and process. Recommended courses: ART 220, 230, and 270.

Education requirements: EDST 180, 350, 440, and EDUC 430, 650, and 660.

Student teaching is usually done in a 13th term. For other general regulations governing students seeking certification to teach, see the Department of Education.

Students intending to complete the program in art certification should declare their intention to their advisor and the director of teacher education as early as possible, preferably before the end of the sophomore year.

Senior Experience in Studio Art

The studio art Senior Experience consists of two separate yet complementary components: ART 600: Senior Seminar (usually offered Term II) and participation in the Senior Exhibition, held annually in the Wriston Galleries near the end of Term III.

Both aspects of the studio art Senior Experience are intended to be a culmination of the practical and conceptual art-making skills developed through the studio art program. Designed to inform one another, both serve to encourage a more refined awareness and understanding of current issues pertinent to contemporary art along with the applied skills and critical thinking processes necessary for success either in graduate school or as a professional visual artist.

Students pursuing double majors and double degrees are encouraged to consult in advance with the studio art faculty if they are interested in developing a body of work for the senior art exhibition that integrates their interests in both majors.

Courses - Studio Art

ART 100: Introduction to 3D Art

An introduction to studio art and the fundamental principles of 3-Dimensional design. Projects, lectures, readings, class discussions, and critiques examine elements of three-dimensional and time-based design. Historic and contemporary approaches are considered as well as the evolution of technology and the continuum of visual expression. Emphasis is placed on developing the practical and critical thinking skills required in art-making. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.

ART 110: Introduction to 2D Art

An introduction to 2-Dimensional mediums, emphasizing the development of the observational and critical thinking skills important to art-making. Class work is based on exercises that strengthen visual research capabilities, drawing abilities, and mark-making techniques with a variety of tools. Assigned projects address fundamental technical and conceptual problems suggested by historical and contemporary artistic practice. Lectures, readings, discussions, and critiques explore elements of concept and design pertinent to 2-Dimensional mediums. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.

ART 120: Image and Sound I

A basic introduction to the fundamental forms, concepts, terminology, and techniques of filmmaking, contextualized within a critical/historical framework. Students explore multiple approaches to creating meaning through readings, screenings, lectures, discussions, and critiques, paired with video exercises and hands-on instruction.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 120

ART 125: Topics in Interdisciplinary Art

A course designed to provide students an opportunity to study interdisciplinary approaches to art making and knowledge seeking. Topics will vary based on instructors' areas of expertise and interests. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.

Topic for Fall 2018: Photomotion
Photomotion is a hands-on darkroom class exploring strategies for conveying movement using light-sensitive materials. The history, theory, and practice of these techniques, within the continuums of both fine art and cinema, will be addressed.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 318

ART 191: Directed Study in Studio Art

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 195: Internship in Studio Art

The internship will provide an experience-based learning opportunity to enrich the student's artistic process and growth. It will encourage innovation and resourcefulness while facilitating an entrepreneurial and informed approach to future creative pursuits. Students should expect to gain "real world" experience and professional connections as well as skills and insights they can apply directly to their creative projects in the classroom and beyond. Students will work on an individual basis with a faculty supervisor, internship site supervisor, and the Career Center to design, implement and evaluate their academic experience. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 200: Painting

An introduction to painting as a means of visual expression. Topics include technical and formal principles of painting with an emphasis on individual conceptual development. Water-based mediums are used to explore color theory, color mixing, brushwork and styling, image surface, composition, and visual communication. Mixed media and experimentation of materials is encouraged to expand beyond traditional painting practices. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or 110

ART 212: Drawing

An exploration of drawing as a contemporary art medium with an emphasis on observational self-expression. Students will examine various modes of representation centered on the technical and creative aspects of mark-making. Mixed media and experimental elements are encouraged for those students wishing to expand the boundaries of traditional drawing media. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110

ART 220: Printmaking

An introduction to printmaking including three or more of the following processes: monoprint, pressure print, stencil, linocut, woodcut, silk screen, and digital printmaking. There is a strong emphasis on conceptual development with practical application of both traditional and contemporary practices in printmaking. Single and multiple color printing techniques, formal issues, as well as printmaking as a form of visual expression are explored in detail. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110

ART 222: Artist Books

Artist books are explored in a variety of forms including accordions, exposed and non-adhesive bindings, pop-ups, box making and alternative structures. Letterpress along with other forms of printmaking and surface treatments will be used. Techniques of cutting, folding, sewing, gluing, printing and working in dimension are examined in detail. Unique content is expected for each project.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110

ART 223: Image and Sound II

A continuation of FIST 120 with expanded instruction in image design, sound design, sequencing, and concept development. Historical development of the medium and contemporary approaches to creative expression, representational ethics, and audience are emphasized through exercises, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and critiques, culminating in a final video project.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 220
Prerequisite: FIST 120 or consent of instructor

ART 224: Sound Design

An introduction to film sound studies paired with hands-on exploration of cinematic audio recording and editing techniques, with emphasis on sound/image relationships and the use of sound to create meaning. Students will engage in close readings of critical and theoretical texts, view and discuss film screenings, and produce a series of short audio and video exercises, culminating in a final video project showcasing the creative use of film sound.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 222
Prerequisite: FIST 120 or consent of instructor

ART 225: Special Topics in Printmaking

This course provides an introduction to specific peripheral processes of printmaking like papermaking, letterpress printing, and digital printmaking processes and applications. The focus is on research and studio practice in regards to printmaking as an art form with special emphasis on craft and conceptual development. Traditional and contemporary practices in each medium are explored in detail. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.


Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110

ART 230: Photography

An introduction to traditional black-and-white darkroom photography within a fine art context. Medium-format and 35mm SLR camera operations are covered along with darkroom instruction on processing film and making gelatin silver prints. Historic and contemporary ideas about photography as a medium are examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or 110

ART 240: New Media in Art

An introduction to new media within a fine art context. Digital photography, experimental video, sound, photo book design, and blogging are covered as students use the Internet as a venue for presenting projects. The evolution of technology, new media theory, contemporary art discourse, and visual culture are examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 240
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110

ART 245: InterArts: New Media Projects

A class where students make projects that engage the outside world via digital media. Lectures, discussions, readings, and critiques will investigate contemporary interdisciplinary practices and the nature of creativity. Students will be taught the basics of design thinking, leading to conceptual-development, planning, and production. Students work individually or collaboratively on documentary, video, performance, installation, graphic novels, podcasts and web projects. Mac-based.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 245
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110, or consent of instructor

ART 250: Ceramics

An introduction to the basic working methods of ceramics through hand-building techniques. Emphasis will be placed on conceptual development, sensitivity to three-dimensional form, and technical skills of surface and glazing. Lectures, readings, and individual research treat historical and contemporary approaches to expressive work in the ceramic medium. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or 110

ART 256: Special Topics in Ceramics

This course is a combination of research and studio practice. Through lectures, readings and discussions the class will survey the history of ceramics with the goal of informing the studio work for the course. Students will engage in independent research to develop ideas and critical thinking as well as building on a variety of ceramic skills to create a personal body of work. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.

Topic for Spring 2019: Narrative Clay
This course will explore the use of the narrative in ceramics. Topics will include the exploration of 2-d surface techniques, the narrative potential of functional and sculptural objects, and how to communicate through the combination of surface and form. Historical and contemporary examples of storytelling in ceramics will be examined.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110, or consent of instructor

ART 270: Sculpture

An introduction to the concepts and processes of sculpture, including work in casting, carving, woodworking, assemblage, and mold-making. Discussions will focus on contemporary sculpture and technical/conceptual development. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 100 or 110

ART 300: Intermediate Painting

A continuation of ART 200, exploring more complex principles of visual expression. Emphasis on oil-based painting techniques, historic and contemporary practices, pictorial structure, formal and theoretical interactions with a strong focus on conceptual development. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 200

ART 312: Intermediate Drawing

An emphasis on a more refined exploration of various models of the formal, conceptual, and personal modes of expression including issues of stylization, abstraction, and mixed media. Students will develop a cohesive body of work informed by an awareness of historical art movements and contemporary uses of the medium. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 210 or ART 212

ART 319: Principles of Editing

A theoretical and practical introduction to connecting images and sound in a compelling way. The goal is to promote understanding of film, video, and new media as tools for creative expression and to help students think critically and make informed choices about editing.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 319
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

ART 320: Intermediate Printmaking

A continuation of ART 220, exploring traditional and contemporary techniques in printmaking, with an emphasis on color and combination printing specific to the aesthetic characteristics of each process. Three or more of the following processes are used to enhance the conceptual and visual narrative inherent to this graphic medium, including collagraph, intaglio, plate and stone lithography, and relief. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 220 or ART 225

ART 322: Intermediate Artist Books

A continuation of ART 222, exploring additional historical and contemporary bindings, and paper making with an emphasis on multiple related processes. Color and combination printing specific to the aesthetic characteristics of each process. Installation, altered books, wearable books and performance are explored in detail in conjunction with alternative processes to enhance the conceptual and visual narrative inherent to this sequential medium.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 222

ART 330: Intermediate Photography

A continuation of ART 230 with an introduction to pinhole and 4x5 view cameras along with expanded darkroom instruction on sheet film processing and the cyanotype print. The history of photography and contemporary art issues related to the medium are examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 230

ART 340: Intermediate New Media in Art

A continuation of Art 240 or 245 using new media within a contemporary art context. Digital photography, experimental video, social media, performance, and installation are covered while using the Internet and campus spaces as venues for projects. Contemporary art discourse is examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 340
Prerequisite: ART 240 or ART 245

ART 350: Intermediate Ceramics

A continuation of hand-building techniques, wheel-throwing, and mold-making with additional research into clay and glaze formulation firing methods. Emphasis will be placed on development of content and a personal vocabulary. An expanded survey, artist research, and critical readings will examine ceramics as a form of contemporary visual expression. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 250 or ART 255

ART 365: Intermediate Topics in Studio Art

A course designed to provide students an opportunity to study important issues in contemporary art not covered in other regularly offered classes. Topics will vary bsed on the faculty member's areas of expertise and interests. May be repeated for credit when topic is different. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.

Topic for Spring 2019: Art in the Public Realm
This course will explore a variety of approaches to creating public art including murals, monuments, sculpture, performance, guerilla art, public intervention and more. We will examine the processes, history, and role of contemporary public art through the creation of works engaging the larger community beyond the gallery setting.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Any 200-level studio art course

ART 370: Intermediate Sculpture

A continuation of the concepts and techniques introduced in ART 270, with emphasis on students' development of a personal visual language. Materials and processes covered include: mold-making, casting, metal fabrication, plastics, woodworking, and mixed media. Areas of examination include site-specific art, public sculpture, multiples and installation. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 270

ART 371: Documentary Forms

This course presents a broad overview of contemporary and historical documentary filmmaking practice through readings, screenings, discussion, and short video projects. Students will engage with critical dialogues and explore several distinct approaches to documentary production, including rhetorical, observational, participatory, and reflexive forms, culminating in a completed short documentary.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 371
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

ART 372: Avant-Doc

An exploration of personal, experimental, and emerging approaches to documentary filmmaking through video projects, readings, screenings, lecture, discussion, and critique. This course examines both contemporary practice and historical intersections among filmmaking traditions, with a focus on engaging with critical dialogues and diverse ways of articulating relationships between maker, subject, and audience.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 370
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

ART 390: Tutorial in Studio Art

Offered for intermediate and advanced study in studio art. Apply to the instructor at least one term in advance with written proposal and a preliminary bibliography.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 391: Directed Study in Studio Art

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 395: Internship in Studio Art

The internship will provide an experience-based learning opportunity to enrich the student's artistic process and growth. It will encourage innovation and resourcefulness while facilitating an entrepreneurial and informed approach to future creative pursuits. Students should expect to gain "real world" experience and professional connections as well as skills and insights they can apply directly to their creative projects in the classroom and beyond. Students will work on an individual basis with a faculty supervisor, internship site supervisor, and the Career Center to design, implement and evaluate their academic experience. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 399: Independent Study in Studio Art

Advanced creative research for students preparing for the senior exhibition or doing honors projects.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 500: Advanced Painting

A continuation of ART 300. Advanced research into the technical, formal, conceptual, and theoretical approach to painting as an expressive art form. The emphasis is for each student to produce a self-designed project that focuses on creating a cohesive body of work. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 300 and consent of instructor

ART 501: Junior Studio Art Practicum

The primary purpose of this course is to assist in the research, planning, design, and preparatory development of junior level studio art majors as they begin the process of conceptualizing and creating a mature body of work for the senior exhibition and/or honors projects. This course will be taught as a seminar with a studio component. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Any 500-level studio art course or consent of instructor

ART 512: Advanced Drawing

An advanced exploration of drawing as a contemporary art medium with an emphasis on more complex self-expression and conceptual development. Current themes in contemporary visual culture will be examined as a place for students to contemplate his or her own voice in the continuum of the drawing discipline. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 312 or consent of instructor

ART 520: Advanced Printmaking

A continuation of ART 320, exploring advanced research into combination printmaking techniques, with exploration of formal, theoretical, and technical issues related to printmaking as an expressive art form. Alternative and experimental processes are used to further develop the conceptual and visual narrative. The emphasis is for each student to produce a self-designed project that focuses on creating a cohesive body of work. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 320 and consent of instructor

ART 522: Advanced Artist Books

A continuation of ART 322, exploring advanced research into combining book making techniques, with exploration of formal, theoretical and technical issues related to artist books as an expressive art form. Alternative and experimental processes are used to further develop the conceptual and visual narrative. The emphasis is for each student to produce a self-designed project that focuses on creating a cohesive body of work.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 322

ART 530: Advanced Photography

A continuation of Art 330 with instruction in advanced analog photography practice within a contemporary art context. Project planning and implementation are emphasized as students work toward producing a self-designed project with a developed artist statement. The history of photography and contemporary art issues related to the medium are examined through readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 330 and consent of instructor

ART 540: Advanced New Media in Art

A continuation of Art 340 using new media at an advanced level. Digital photography, experimental video, social media, performance, and installation are covered while using the Internet and campus spaces as venues for projects. Contemporary art discourse is examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 540
Prerequisite: ART 340 and consent of instructor

ART 550: Advanced Ceramics

A continuation of Art 350. Students conduct individual work on a topic related to contemporary ceramic practice, while expanding technical skills and addressing issues in current ceramic criticism. Project planning and implementation are emphasized to develop a cohesive body of work. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 350 and consent of instructor

ART 565: Advanced Topics in Studio Art

A more advanced and in-depth opportunity to study important issues in contemporary art not covered in other regularly offered classes. Current themes in contemporary visual culture will be examined as a place for students to contemplate the role and purpose of art in its larger societal context. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Any 300-level studio art course

ART 570: Advanced Sculpture

A more refined continuation of the ideas, issues and skills addressed in ART 370. Individualized project planning and implementation are emphasized as students develop a unique and consistent body of work. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 370 and consent of instructor

ART 585: Art in the Elementary and Secondary Schools

Art class observations, studio practice in both two- and three-dimensional disciplines, studio demonstrations/lectures, and selected readings and discussions relative to the visual expression of the elementary, junior, and senior high school student.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Education 585
Prerequisite: Four studio art courses, EDUC 180 and 340, and two art history courses

ART 590: Tutorial in Studio Art

Offered for intermediate and advanced study in studio art. Apply to the instructor at least one term in advance with written proposal and a preliminary bibliography.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 591: Directed Study in Studio Art

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 595: Internship in Studio Art

The internship will provide an experience-based learning opportunity to enrich the student's artistic process and growth. It will encourage innovation and resourcefulness while facilitating an entrepreneurial and informed approach to future creative pursuits. Students should expect to gain "real world" experience and professional connections as well as skills and insights they can apply directly to their creative projects in the classroom and beyond. Students will work on an individual basis with a faculty supervisor, internship site supervisor, and the Career Center to design, implement and evaluate their academic experience. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 599: Independent Study in Studio Art

Advanced creative research for students preparing for the senior exhibition or doing honors projects.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 600: Studio Art Senior Seminar

Intended to serve as a capstone experience for students in studio art, this course is designed to complement and work in conjunction with the student’s preparations for the Senior Exhibition. It will cover the practical concerns relevant to working as a professional artist along with current issues pertinent to the contemporary art world. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and declared major in Studio Art or consent of the instructor

ART 601: Senior Studio Art Practicum

The primary purpose of this course is to galvanize and standardize the studio art majors' preparations for the senior exhibition departmental requirement. By immersing the student in creating and exhibiting an advanced body of work with greater faculty oversight coupled with more formalized peer input, we expect to strengthen students' synthesizing of information, ideas, and conceptual concerns accumulated over the course of their studio art education. Secondary concerns are reflection, assessment and documentation of work produced. This course will be taught as a seminar with a studio component. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ART 600

ART 690: Tutorial in Studio Art

Offered for intermediate and advanced study in studio art. Apply to the instructor at least one term in advance with written proposal and a preliminary bibliography.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 691: Directed Study in Studio Art

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 695: Internship in Studio Art

The internship will provide an experience-based learning opportunity to enrich the student's artistic process and growth. It will encourage innovation and resourcefulness while facilitating an entrepreneurial and informed approach to future creative pursuits. Students should expect to gain "real world" experience and professional connections as well as skills and insights they can apply directly to their creative projects in the classroom and beyond. Students will work on an individual basis with a faculty supervisor, internship site supervisor, and the Career Center to design, implement and evaluate their academic experience. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ART 699: Independent Study in Studio Art

Advanced creative research for students preparing for the senior exhibition or doing honors projects.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Art History

Associate professor:E. Carlson (Art and Art History)
Assistant professors:D. Joyner (Art and Art History), N. Lin (Art and Art History), B. Zinsli (Art and Art History)

An integral part of a liberal arts curriculum, the courses of the art and art history department encourage aesthetic awareness and appreciation by emphasizing the interdependence of art-making, art history, and other creative and intellectual fields. A major is offered in either studio art or art history, and certification for teaching K-12 is available in conjunction with the studio art major. A student may complete a double major in studio art and art history by fulfilling the requirements for each major. Students planning to major in studio art and/ or art history should take the introductory 100-level courses required for the major in their freshman and sophomore years. Students may take a maximum of 126 units in the art and art history department, provided that no more than 90 are in either studio art or art history.

Required for the art history major

  1. A minimum of 10 art history courses (60 units) to include:
    • ARHI 100 and 102
    • One 200- or 300-level course (6 units each) in each of the following periods:
      • Ancient
      • Medieval and Renaissance
      • Modern and Contemporary
    • One 400 level course (6 units)
    • ARHI 660
    • ARHI 680
    • Two Additional Art History courses (12 units)
  2. One course in studio art (6 units)

Required for the art history minor

  1. A minimum of six art history courses (36 units) to include:
    • ARHI 100 and 102
    • Three courses at the 200 or 300 level (6 units each) to be taken from at least two of the following periods:
      • Ancient
      • Medieval and Renaissance
      • Modern and Contemporary
    • One 400-level course (6 units)
  2. C average in the minor

Recommendations

Art history majors are urged to coordinate with their studies participation in one of Lawrence’s international off-campus programs or the program at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

Art history majors, particularly those considering graduate studies, are strongly encouraged to begin the study of German and/or French in the freshman or sophomore year.

Senior Experience in Art History

The art history Senior Experience consists of two 600-level courses: ARHI 660: The Methods of Art History and ARHI 680: Senior Seminar. ARHI 660 may be taken during the junior or senior year and serves as the prerequisite for ARHI 680, taken during the senior year. Students pursuing double majors and double degrees are encouraged to consult in advance with the art history faculty if they are interested in pursuing a research topic in ARHI 680 that integrates their interests in both majors.

Courses - Art History

ARHI 100: Survey of Western Art I: Ancient to Medieval

An introductory survey of the art and architecture of the ancient Near East and of Europe from the Prehistoric through the Gothic periods and an introduction to methods of viewing art in its historical and cultural context.
Units: 6.

ARHI 101: Introduction to Art History

This lecture course aims to develop skills in the critical analysis of a wide range of visual materials. Issues and problems in the making, exhibition, and understanding of images and objects will be explored through lectures, classroom discussion of key works, critical reading of primary and secondary sources, and visits to the Wriston Print Study Rooom. Students will be assessed through exams and writing assignments.
Units: 6.

ARHI 102: Survey of Western Art II: Renaissance to Modern

An introductory survey of the art and architecture of Europe and North America from the Renaissance to the Modern era. Particular emphasis on viewing works of art and architecture within their historical and cultural context.
Units: 6.

ARHI 130: Art of the Islamic World

An introduction to rich artistic traditions of the Islamic world from the 7th century to the present, looking at architecture, illuminated manuscripts, metalwork, film, and more. Topics include the role of art in Islam, the relationship between art and power, and the importance of cross-cultural exchange.
Units: 6.

ARHI 175: The Arts of East Asia

An introduction to artistic traditions in China, Japan, and Korea, from prehistory to the 21st century, including such objects as tomb and temple sites, gardens sculpture, calligraphy, painting, prints, and bronze and ceramic vessels. Through a balance of broader art historical readings, primary texts, scholarly essays, and focused exercises in viewing, students will explore how an object’s visual and material properties contribute to its function.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 175

ARHI 191: Directed Study in Art History

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ARHI 195: Internship in Art History

Applied work in art history arranged and carried out under the direction of a faculty member. Students might work for a gallery, museum, archive, auction house, a publication, or visual resource database. The academic internship is supplemented with readings, discussions, and assignments. The course grade will be based on submitted work evaluated by the supervising faculty member.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ARHI 200: Archaic and Classical Greek Art

A study of Greek art and architecture to the end of the fourth century B.C. Topics include the great sanctuaries at Olympia, Delphi, and Athens; the development of mythological narrative in sculpture and vase painting; the political and propagandistic function of Greek art; and the beginning of portraiture.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Classics 340
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or sophomore standing

ARHI 202: From Alexander to Kleopatra: Art of the Hellenistic Age

A study of Greek and Greek-influenced art from the time of Alexander the Great to the Roman conquest of Egypt in 31 B.C. Topics include portraiture and the royal iconography of the Hellenistic rulers, the development of regional styles in sculpture, and the influence of the Romans as patrons.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Classics 345
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or sophomore standing

ARHI 204: Roman Art

A study of the art and architecture of the Etruscans and the Romans to the end of the Roman empire. Topics include the funerary arts of the Etruscans, the art and archaeology of Pompeii and Herculaneum, developments in imperial portraiture and historical relief, technological innovations in architecture, and the beginnings of Christian art.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Classics 350
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or sophomore standing

ARHI 210: Early Medieval Art and Architecture

A survey of art and architecture in Europe and the eastern Mediterranean between the fourth and ninth centuries. Topics include Imperial-sponsored Christian art, the development of Byzantine art and architecture, the Celtic artistic tradition of northern Europe, and the flowering of art under the Carolingian emperors.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or sophomore standing

ARHI 211: Splendor & Power: Byzantine Art

Surveys the art and architecture of the Byzantine Empire, including mosaics, metalwork, icons, manuscripts, textiles, and other arts. Emphasizes the transition from classical Roman society, the patronage of Byzantine political figures, the profound importance of religion for the arts, and international contacts, especially with western Europe and the Islamic world.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or sophomore standing

ARHI 213: Gothic and Northern Renaissance Art

The arts of this period are famous for their beauty and grandeur, from soaring cathedrals to delicate paintings. We will consider these beautiful works alongside historical changes within the cultural, economic, and ideological fabric of society, as well as contemporary theories about social contruction and the nature of objects.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or sophomore standing

ARHI 215: Art of the Medieval Manuscript

Manuscrpts offer hands-on access to the arts, ideas, and lives of varied people and cultures from the Middle Ages (400-1400). This class examines the making, meaning, and diverse functions of medieval manuscripts ranging from epic literature and contemplative prayers to scientific treatises and law codes. We will utilize digitized collections, facsimilies, and actual manuscripts as well as scholarly studies. Written assignments and an exam.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 101 or sophomore standing

ARHI 220: Art of the Italian Renaissance

A study of the art and architecture of Italy from the late 13th century until the early 16th century. Topics include patronage and the art market, the revival and influence of the antique, theories of perspective and design, and changes in the status of the artist.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 102 or sophomore standing

ARHI 240: From Romanticism to Post-Impressionism: Art of the 19th Century

A study of the development of 19th-century European art that traces the emergence of movements such as Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism. Readings and class discussion consider how political instability, industrialization, imperialism, and the growth of popular culture influenced production, style, and presentation of painting and sculpture.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 102 or sophomore standing

ARHI 242: Art of the Avant-Garde: 1900-1960

A study of 20th-century European and American art that traces the emergence of movements such as Cubism, Surrealism, and Abstract Expressionism. The shifting meanings of art, artistic production, and the definition of the term “artist” are considered against the massive political and social changes of the time period.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 102 or sophomore standing

ARHI 244: Representing Identity in American Art

An examination of American art, 1776-1940. This course considers the growth of landscape, genre, and history painting, as well as portraiture, in the context of changing ideas about nationalism, class, race, and gender. Architecture and sculpture are also discussed in terms of how visual culture shaped early ideas about nationhood.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 102 or sophomore standing

ARHI 246: 19th-Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain

In the 19th century, Britain was at the height of her imperial and industrial powers, with a burgeoning middle class with increased spending power. Against this background, this course examines the painting (including Turner, Constable, the Pre-Raphaelites, the High Victorians), architecture, furniture, and interiors of the period, utilizing the wealth of examples in London’s museums, galleries, and buildings. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

ARHI 250: History of Photography

Introduction to photography’s histories, from early attempts to fix light and shadows to the diverse digital practices of the present. Topics will include: social, scientific, and artistic uses of photography; theoretical and critical writings on photography and its place in our visual culture; and major figures, movements, and images.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 102 or sophomore standing

ARHI 272: African-American Art

Beginning with the late eighteenth century and concluding with art today, this course examines African-American history through visual culture. We will examine how race relations in the United States were and are constructed through an examination of painting, sculpture, public monuments, photography, advertising, and performance.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 290
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ARHI 275: Latin American Visual Art

The course introduces the cultures of Latin America through a survey of its major movements and artists from the early 19th century to the present. Image-based lectures will be accompanied by discussion of visual and thematically related texts (i.e., biographies, letters, scholarly articles) and carefully selected fragments of videos.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 425
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Spanish or consent of instructor

ARHI 284: The Spectacle of Edo Japan

This lecture-discussion course will focus on the diverse artistic production and consumption within Edo-period Japan (1603-1868). Topics include the revival of classical imagery, the rise of an urban bourgeois culture, the prints and paintings depicting theater and the pleasure quarters, the reification of the tea ceremony and encounters with the West through trade. Coursework will include exams, written assignments, and presentations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 284
Prerequisite: ARHI 175 or sophomore standing

ARHI 285: The Transformation of the Modern City: Tokyo, Seoul and Shanghai (1860-1945)

This lecture-discussion course explores the transformation of the cityscape in Tokyo, Seoul and Shanghai. Topics include the emergence of the modern artist, the search for an “avant-garde” of the East, the modernization of public and private spaces, the introduction of film and photography and the rise of the “modern girl.” Coursework will include exams, written assignments, and presentations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 285
Prerequisite: ARHI 175 or sophomore standing

ARHI 286: The Politics of Power in Modern and Contemporary Chinese Art

Over the past century, China has witnessed the arrival of Western Imperialism, mass rebellion, revolution, and radical reconstruction under the Communist regime. This seminar will trace how artists attempted to intervene in social life to change its course of devlopment and how art continues to affect radical social change. Students will be assessed through exams, presentations, and written assignments.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 286
Prerequisite: ARHI 101 or sophomore standing

ARHI 301: Topics in Ancient Art

An examination of a particular topic in ancient art history. Students are expected to carry out independent research through a series of guided assignments. The topic will change periodically. May be repeated when topic the is different. Not open to students who have previously received or need to receive credit for ARHI 400 with the same topic.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: 200-level art history course or consent of instructor

ARHI 315: Introduction to the Art Museum: History, Issues, and Practices

Introduction to art museums and exhibitions as objects of critical inquiry, and to issues and practices in the art museum field. Topics will include: history and evolution of collecting and display; museum exhibitions and knowledge formation; collection practices and ethics; exhibition theory and design; controversies, institutional critique, and the artist-as-curator.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 315
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ARHI 320: Contemporary Art: Critical Questions in Art Today

A study of art since 1960. Students will examine a diverse range of art works and the theories and strategies that have informed their production and exhibition. Students will learn about how artists today respond to such issues as gender, racial and ethnic identity, globalization, market capitalism, and new media and technology.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 102, ARHI 242, or consent of instructor

ARHI 321: Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Art

An examination of a particular toic in mideival and reanssance art history. Students are expected to carry out independent research through a series of guided assignments. The topic will change periodically. Course may be repeated when topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received or need to receive credit for ARHI 420 with the same topic.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: 200-level art history course or consent of instructor

ARHI 325: Ethics in Archaeology: Who owns the past?

An exploration of ethical and legal concerns surrounding archaeology: the ownership and treatment of archaeological remains and relations between archaeologists and descendent communities. Topics include the ethics and legality of collecting looting, and the antiquities market; archaeology and nationalism; repatriation of skeletons and artifacts; and professional responsibilities of archaeologists.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 328, Classics 368
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ANTH 120, an ARHI course (preferably ancient to Renaissance), or consent of instructor

ARHI 330: Seminar: Portraiture

This course explores definitions of portraiture and surveys the history of portraiture from antiquity to the present. Topics will include the ruler portrait, the self-portrait, the group portrait, photography and portraiture, and portraiture and modernism.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or ARHI 102

ARHI 331: Topics in East Asian Art

An examination of a particular topic in East Asian art history. Students are expected to carry out independent reaseach through a series of guided assignments. The topic will change periodically. Course may be repeated when the topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received or need to receive credit for ARHI 430.

Topic for Spring 2019: Modern Ruins in East Asia
In examining modern catastrophes—acts of war, iconoclasm, natural and man-made disasters, this seminar will focus on how sites of modern ruination have been both documented and aestheticized. Individual case studies will include the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake, wartime reportage, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, protest imagery, the demotion of colonial architecture, and environmental art. Coursework will include written assignments and a research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 331
Prerequisite: One 200-level course in art historyor consent of instructor

ARHI 335: Faith and Power in Mediterranean Cities

This course examines the complex histories of buildings and urban landscapes around the Mediterranean, emphasizing how religious and political structures transformed them from the Classical world, through Christian and Islamic empires, and down to modern nation states. The city of Istanbul will be a central focus, though case studies from other cities will be introduced.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 365
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ARHI 341: Topics in Contemporary and Modern Art

An examination of a particular topic in modern and/or contemporary art history. Students are expected to carry out independent research through a series of guided assignments. The topic will change periodically. Course may be repeated when the topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received or need to receive credit for ARHI 440.

Topic for Fall 2018: Art Nouveau
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 200-level course in art history or consent of instructor

ARHI 345: Theorizing the Female Body in East Asian Art

This discussion-based course will examine how tomb murals, paintings, prints, photography, and film have addressed the female body throughout East Asian history. We will explore how social and political issues were defined and negotiated through the gendered images of bodies in Japan, Korea and China in the context of national identity formation, historical reconstruction, subjectivity and sexuality. Coursework will include written assignments and a research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 345, Gender Studies 345
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ARHI 381: Topics in Art History

An examination of a particular topic in art history. Students are expected to carry out independent research thorugh a series of guided assignments. The topic will change periodically. Course may be repeated when topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received credit or need to receive credit for ARHI 480.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: 200-level art history course or consent of instructor

ARHI 390: Tutorial Studies in Art History

Tutorials for advanced students in art history. Apply to the instructor at least one term in advance with a written proposal and a preliminary bibliography.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ARHI 391: Directed Study in Art History

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ARHI 395: Internship in Art History

Applied work in art history arranged and carried out under the direction of a faculty member. Students might work for a gallery, museum, archive, auction house, a publication, or visual resource database. The academic internship is supplemented with readings, discussions, and assignments. The course grade will be based on submitted work evaluated by the supervising faculty member.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ARHI 399: Independent Study in Art History

Advanced study for students doing honors projects in art history.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ARHI 400: Topics in Ancient Art

An examination of a particular topic in ancient art history. Students are expected to carry out independent research. The topic will change periodically. Course may be repeated when the topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received or need to receive credit for ARHI 301 with the same topic.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Classics 540
Prerequisite: One 200- or 300-level course in art history, one course in classics, or consent of the instructor.

ARHI 420: Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Art

An examination of a particular topic in medieval or Renaissance art history. The topic will change periodically. Course may be repeated when the topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received or need to receive credit for ARHI 420 with the same topic.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 200- or 300-level course in art history, or consent of the instructor

ARHI 430: Topics in Asian Art

An examination of a particular topic in the history of art in Asia. Students are expected to carry out independent research culminating in a research paper. Course may be repeated when topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received credit for ARHI 331.

Topic for Spring 2019: Modern Ruins in East Asia
In examining modern catastrophes—acts of war, iconoclasm, natural and man-made disasters, this seminar will focus on how sites of modern ruination have been both documented and aestheticized. Individual case studies will include the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake, wartime reportage, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, protest imagery, the demotion of colonial architecture, and environmental art. Coursework will include written assignments and a research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 430
Prerequisite: One 200-level course in art history or consent of instructor

ARHI 440: Topics in Modern and Contemporary Art

An examination of a particular topic in modern or contemporary art history. Students are expected to carry out independent research, culminating in a research paper. The topic will change periodically. Course may be repeated when topic is different. Not open to students who have previous received credit for ARHI 341.

Topic for Fall 2018: Art Nouveau
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 200-level course in art history or consent of instructor

ARHI 480: Topics in Art History

An examination of a particular topic in art history that does not fit the chronological format of the other 400-level topics seminars in art history. Course may be repeated when topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received credit or need to receive credit for ARHI 381.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 200- or 300-level course in art history or consent of instructor

ARHI 590: Tutorial Studies in Art History

Tutorials for advanced students in art history. Apply to the instructor at least one term in advance with a written proposal and a preliminary bibliography.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ARHI 591: Directed Study In Art History

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ARHI 595: Internship in Art History

Applied work in art history arranged and carried out under the direction of a faculty member. Students might work for a gallery, museum, archive, auction house, a publication, or visual resource database. The academic internship is supplemented with readings, discussions, and assignments. The course grade will be based on submitted work evaluated by the supervising faculty member.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ARHI 599: Independent Study in Art History

Advanced study for students doing honors projects in art history.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ARHI 660: Methods of Art History

This course will examine the theories and methods practiced in art history. It will concentrate on key texts, from antiquity to the present, relating to the history and criticism of art and visual culture. Readings will include authors and texts that have come to define the discipline, and more recent authors who have begun to challenge those defining texts.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and three courses in ARHI numbered 200 or above, or consent of instructor

ARHI 680: Senior Research Seminar

A senior seminar in which students will conduct research on a topic of their choice and produce a substantive original paper in which they demonstrate their ability to comprehend the scholarly literature on the topic, to subject it to appropriate methods of analysis, and to present the results in well-written and professionally documented form. Open to students who, having completed a 400-level art history course, have previously investigated a research topic that will serve as the foundation for their work in this course.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Senior standing, ARHI 660, and one 400-level art history course or consent of the instructor

ARHI 690: Tutorial Studies in Art History

Tutorials for advanced students in art history. Apply to the instructor at least one term in advance with a written proposal and a preliminary bibliography.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ARHI 691: Directed Study in Art History

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ARHI 695: Internship in Art History

Applied work in art history arranged and carried out under the direction of a faculty member. Students might work for a gallery, museum, archive, auction house, a publication, or visual resource database. The academic internship is supplemented with readings, discussions, and assignments. The course grade will be based on submitted work evaluated by the supervising faculty member.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ARHI 699: Independent Study in Art History

Advanced study for students doing honors projects in art history.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Biochemistry

Professor:E. De Stasio (The Raymond H. Herzog Professor of Science Biology)
Associate professors:S. Debbert (Chemistry), K. Dickson (Biology), D. Hall (Chemistry), D. Martin (Physics) (on leave term(s) II, III)

Biochemistry is the study of biological phenomena at the molecular level. Specifically, the scientific principles explored in chemistry and physics are related to the biology of organisms or communities of organisms. Although scientists have been fascinated with the molecules that compose living organisms for more than 200 years, biochemistry was finally recognized as a discipline at the beginning of the 20th century, as scientists strove to understand nutrition and metabolism in the context of human disease. Modern biochemistry is a vast subject that has applications to medicine, dentistry, agriculture, forensics, toxicology, pharmacy, anthropology, environmental science, and other fields.

Biochemistry is a dynamic and highly technical field. A degree in biochemistry presents students with many options for careers or advanced study. The biochemistry major will prepare students for graduate study in biochemistry (or allied fields such as bacteriology, genetics, or oncology) as well as for many pre-professional programs of study.

The biochemistry curriculum includes a strong foundation in the basic sciences, core courses central to the field, and electives that enable students to explore aspects of biochemistry in sub-fields of their choice. Most courses include an intensive laboratory experience, supported by equipment in biology, chemistry, and physics. Experimental work becomes progressively more sophisticated and creative in advanced courses as students gain insight to the primary literature and cutting-edge laboratory techniques. Students are strongly encouraged to engage in summer research, either in an academic setting — at Lawrence or another institution — or in industry.

The vision of a biochemistry Senior Experience is best described by a report by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), Greater Expectations: A New Vision for Learning as a Nation Goes to College. A biochemistry major at graduation should be an “intentional learner who can adapt to new environments, integrate knowledge from different sources, and continue learning throughout their life. They should also become empowered learners through the mastery of intellectual and practical skills by learning to effectively communicate orally, and in writing; understand and employ quantitative and qualitative analysis to solve problems; interpret and evaluate information from a variety of sources; understand and work within complex systems; demonstrate intellectual agility and the ability to manage change; transform information into knowledge and knowledge into judgment and action.”

The biochemistry major is highly compatible and complementary with the neuroscience program and a number of minors including Biology, Biomedical Ethics, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, and Computer Science. This flexibility allows a student in the major to consider and prepare for a multitude of career options.

Required for the Biochemistry Major

Required Foundation Courses

  1. CHEM 116: Principles of Chemistry
  2. CHEM 250: Organic Chemistry I
  3. BIOL 130: Integrative Biology: Principles
  4. MATH 140: Calculus I or MATH 120 and 130: Applied Calculus I and II
  5. MATH 207: Introduction to Probability and Statistics (calculus based-recommended) or MATH 107: Elementary Statistics or BIOL 170: Experimental Design and Analysis
  6. PHYS 141: Principles of Classical Physics and 151: Principles of Modern Physics
  7. Senior Experience Courses — Please see description in the respective departmental portions of the course catalog
    • CHEM 380 (1 unit S/U)
    • CHEM 480 (2 units S/U)
    • CHEM 680 (3 units S/U)
      -OR-
    • BIOL 650 (5 units and 1 unit))

Required Core Courses

  1. BIOL 354: Molecular Biology
  2. CHEM 340: Biochemistry I (also BIOL 444)
  3. CHEM 440: Biochemistry II
  4. Elective Courses (Students must choose three courses from the list below, including at least one CHEM and one BIOL. One of the three must be a laboratory class)
    • Biology courses:
      • BIOL 226: EMicrobiology
      • BIOL 235: Evolutionary Biology
      • BIOL 241: Cell Physiology
      • BIOL 325: Cell Biology
      • BIOL 340: Topics in Neuroscience (also PSYC 580)
      • BIOL 356: Bioinformatics
      • BIOL 430: Immunology
      • BIOL 453: Developmental Biology
      • BIOL 510: Modern Concepts of Embryogenesis
      • BIOL 520: Cancer Biology
    • Chemistry courses:
      • CHEM 210: Analytical Chemistry
      • CHEM 252: Organic Chemistry II
      • CHEM 320: Inorganic Chemistry
      • CHEM 370: Chemical Dynamics
      • CHEM 410: Instrumental Analysis
      • CHEM 450: Topics in Advanced Organic Chemistry
    • Other:
      • PSYC 350: Psychopharmacology and Behavior
      • PHYS 570: Biological Physics

Courses - Biochemistry

MATH 107: Elementary Statistics

For students in all disciplines. Provides the background needed to evaluate statistical arguments found in newspapers, magazines, reports, and journals and the logic and techniques necessary to perform responsible elementary statistical analysis. Topics include basic data analysis, one-variable regression, experimental and sampling design, random variables, sampling distributions, and inference (confidence intervals and significance testing). This course may not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Completion of 54 units in Lawrence courses or consent of instructor

CHEM 116: Principles of Chemistry: Energetics and Dynamics

Introduction to the study of chemistry, for students who have taken high school chemistry or CHEM 115, emphasizing structural and quantitative models of chemical behavior. Topics include bonding, thermochemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, and related applications. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Enrollment is determined by placement examination for students who have not completed CHEM 115. See the chemistry department's web page for placement examination information.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 115 or placement examination

MATH 120: Applied Calculus I

A course in the applications of mathematics to a wide variety of areas, stressing economics and the biological sciences. Topics may include recursive sequences and their equilibria, the derivative of a function, optimization, fitting abstract models to observed data. Emphasis placed on algebraic and numerical techniques and on understanding the role of mathematical thinking. Mathematics 120 and 130 do not prepare students for more advanced courses in mathematics.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics;

BIOL 130: Integrative Biology: Cells to Organisms

An exploration of fundamental cellular processes in an evolutionary context including homeostasis, cell cycle, gene expression, energy transformation, inheritance, and multi-cellular development. Experimental approaches will be emphasized. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.

MATH 130: Applied Calculus II

A continuation of math 120. Topics may include the indefinite and definite integral, elementary linear algebra including matrix arithmetic and solving linear equations, vectors, partial derivatives, Lagrange multipliers. Both algebraic and numerical computations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 120 or the equivalent

MATH 140: Calculus I

Functions, limits, derivatives, the Mean Value Theorem, definition and properties of integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications to related rates, curve sketching, and optimization problems.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics and minimum score on ALEKS online diagnostic exam, as set by the department.

PHYS 141: Principles of Classical, Relativistic, and Quantum Mechanics

A calculus-based introduction to fundamental concepts in mechanics, from Galileo and Newton through relativity and quantum mechanics. Weekly laboratories emphasize the acquisition, reduction and interpretation of experimental data and the keeping of complete records. Explicit instruction in calculus will be provided.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: None, but calculus is recommended.

PHYS 151: Principles of Classical Physics

A continuation of Physics 141. Physics 151 offers a brief review of mechanics, and covers electricity, magnetism, circuits, waves, optics and thermal physics. Weekly laboratories emphasize the acquisition, reduction, and interpretation of experimental data and the keeping of complete records.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 141, or one year of high school physics and MATH 140.

BIOL 170: Integrative Biology: Experimental Design and Statistics

An introduction to experimental and sampling design in the fields of biology and biochemistry, as well as methods of data analysis and interpretation. The connection between statistical analysis and experimental design will be emphasized. Topics include descriptive, exploratory, and confirmatory statistical analyses. Lecture and computer laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or consent of instructor

CHEM 210: Analytical Chemistry

A course in the quantitative description of chemical equilibria in solution (acid-base, complexation, redox, solubility) using classical, separation, electrochemical, and spectrochemical methods of analysis. This course covers methods of quantification, statistics, and data analysis as applied to modern chemistry. Students will have the opportunity to individually design projects. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 250
Prerequisite: CHEM 116, placement exam, or consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in CHEM 211 required

BIOL 226: Microbiology

A study of microbial life with an emphasis on prokaryotes. Microbial physiology is examined in the context of how unique characteristics allow microbes to exploit a vast diversity of environments, including the human body. Laboratory exercises introduce students to techniques used to safely study microorganisms.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and BIOL 150, CHEM 116 recommended

BIOL 235: Evolutionary Biology

A study of biological evolution, including natural selection, adaptation, the evolution of sex, speciation, extinction, and constraints on evolutionary change. Reading primary literature is emphasized. Two lectures and one discussion per week.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 213
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 or ANTH 140

CHEM 250: Organic Chemistry I

A study of the relationship between structure and function in organic compounds. Basic topics such as molecular orbital theory, conformational equilibria, stereochemistry, and nucleophilic substitution are covered. Students also learn to use instrumental analysis (NMR, IR, GC-MS) to identify and characterize compounds. One four-hour laboratory per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 116 or 119 or consent of instructor

CHEM 252: Organic Chemistry II

A study of organic reactions and their mechanisms. The focus of the class is synthesis, both in the concrete sense of building molecules and in the abstract sense of pulling together disparate concepts to solve problems. Case studies from the polymer and pharmaceutical industries underline the relevance of the discipline to everyday life. One four-hour laboratory per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 250

CHEM 320: Inorganic Chemistry

A survey of structures, properties, reactivities, and interrelationships of chemical elements and their compounds. Topics include unifying principles and concepts that enable the interpretation of experimental data associated with materials. Emphasis on multidisciplinary aspects of inorganic chemistry. Lectures and weekly laboratory. Laboratory projects involve synthesis and studies of compounds using a variety of experimental methods.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 250

BIOL 325: Cell Biology

Survey of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells, the basic functional unit of life. Correlation of cellular structures including organelles, proteins, and membranes with functions such as cellular communication, division, transport, movement, and secretory pathways will be analyzed. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and BIOL 150, BIOL 170 recommended

BIOL 340: Topics in Neuroscience

A study of the nervous system from the perspectives of psychology and biology. Topics vary year to year and may include glial cells, neural development, and the evolution of nervous systems and neurotransmitter systems. Lecture only. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2019: Viral Vectors in the Central Nervous System
Viral vectors are exciting tools currently used in the field of gene therapy and in basic neuroscience research to further understand neurobiological processes. Using primary research and review articles as a basis, this course will explore the history of viral vectors, advancements in their design, the therapeutic potential of vectors for CNS disorders and the adverse effects, including biological, environmental and ethical issues, associated with them. Course format includes discussions, presentations, group work and writing assignments.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 580
Prerequisite: CHEM 116, BIOL 150, and one course in psychology; or PSYC 360 and one course in biology; or consent of instructor

CHEM 340: Biochemistry I

An introduction to the study of biological processes at the molecular level with emphases on protein struction and function, enzyme mechanism and kinetics, fundamentals of physical biochemistry, and the chemistry of biological molecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 444
Prerequisite: CHEM 250 or concurrent enrollment, or consent of instructor

PSYC 350: Psychopharmacology and Behavior

An interdisciplinary examination of the ways in which behaviorally active drugs exert their effects, drawing on research in pharmacology, psychology, biochemistry, anatomy, and neurophysiology. Provides an understanding and appreciation of the role of behaviorally active drugs in people’s lives, today and in the past.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; at least one prior biology course recommended

BIOL 354: Molecular Biology

An interdisciplinary examination of regulatory mechanisms leading to differential gene expression. Main topics include transcription, translation, gene and protein structure, and modern genomics. The application of current molecular techniques is emphasized throughout the course. Laboratory work is experimental in approach. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and CHEM 115

CHEM 370: Physical Chemistry I: Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Develops and explores theoretical descriptions of chemical systems: physical states, the laws of thermodynamics as applied to chemical and physical equilibria, chemical reaction kinetics, and catalysis. No laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 150, PHYS 150, CHEM 116; or consent of instructor

CHEM 380: Seminar: Perspectives on Chemistry

A series of presentations by visiting chemists and Lawrence students, faculty, and staff, featuring current issues in chemistry, important applications of chemistry, and professional development topics appropriate to chemistry majors or minors. Approximately one meeting per week. Two or more short “reaction papers” (a short seminar critique or summary) required of each student. Offered annually in the Fall Term. May be repeated for credit.
Units: 1.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; offered annually in the Fall Term

CHEM 410: Instrumental Analysis

An advanced course in instrumental methods of quantification and identification in modern chemistry. Emphasis on instrument design, operating principles, interpretation of instrumental data, and discrimination between techniques. This course focuses on spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical techniques and their application in fundamental and applied research. Students will have the opportunity to individually design projects. Three lectures and one laboratory per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 210 or consent of instructor

BIOL 430: Immunology

This course will cover the basic concepts of immunology, including differentiation of immune cells, antibody structure and function, antigen-antibody reactions, the major-histocompatibility complex, the complement system, immune responses to pathogens, allergies and auto-immune diseases, and comparative immunology. The course will also examine recent advances in the field through current peer-reviewed publications. The weekly laboratory will examine the basic questions, experimental subjects, and procedures of the field.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130, BIOL 150, and junior standing; or consent of instructor

CHEM 440: Biochemistry II

A continuation of Biochemistry I. A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on metabolic pathways, recent advances in biochemical medicine, and biochemical aspects of gene replication, protein synthesis, molecular motors, and sensing. The course is divided between lecture and discussion and will rely heavily on current biochemical literature.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 455
Prerequisite: CHEM 340 or consent of instructor

BIOL 444: Biochemistry I

An introduction to the study of biological processes at the molecular level with emphases on protein struction and function, enzyme mechanism and kinetics, fundamentals of physical biochemistry, and the chemistry of biological molecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chemistry 340
Prerequisite: CHEM 250 or concurrent enrollment, or consent of instructor

CHEM 450: Topics in Advanced Organic Chemistry

A study of modern topics in organic chemistry, emphasizing current literature. Topics may vary from year to year, but the class typically covers organic synthesis in depth. Students will often use the literature and their own expanding understanding of chemical reactivity to design synthetic routes to complex drugs and natural products. No formal laboratory; lab exercises may occasionally substitute for lectures.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 252 or consent of instructor

BIOL 453: Developmental Biology

An experimental approach to animal development with laboratory and lecture emphasis on molecular and cellular processes of embryogenesis. Includes discussions of pattern formation, differentiation, cell interactions, gametogenesis and fertilization. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150; and one of the following (or concurrent enrollment): BIOL 354, BIOL 444/CHEM 340, BIOL 260, or BIOL 325

CHEM 480: Seminar: Chemical Literature

A seminar course intended primarily for junior majors and minors in chemistry. Students learn the character and organization of the chemical literature and become familiar with search strategies, as each selects a topic and, guided by the instructor, conducts a literature search for key papers on that topic, constructs an annotated bibliography, reads several of the most important of the papers, and prepares an end-of-term presentation highlighting key research findings related to their chosen topic.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or consent of instructor

PHYS 500: Special Topics in Physics

Treats selected topics, such as relativity, fundamental particles, fluid mechanics, and surface physics that vary according to the interests of students and staff.

Topic for Fall 2018: General Relativity
This course will explore General Relativity, “one of the greatest triumphs of the human mind.” Along the way, students will come to an appreciation for and understanding of this phrase and of the physics it describes, as well as black holes, event horizons, gravitational waves, and the cosmic microwave background. Prerequisite: PHYS 230, MATH 210
Units: 6.

PHYS 570: Biological Physics

Develops and explores the physical principles underlying biological systems, with a particular emphasis on building quantitative models. Applies fundamental topics including thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, elasticity, and electrostatics to model molecular and cellular phenomena such as gene expression, virus assembly, DNA bending and stretching, and nerve impulses.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 570
Prerequisite: PHYS 151, and one of PHYS 230, CHEM 252, CHEM 340, or BIOL 354

BIOL 650: Biology Senior Capstone

Senior capstone in which students will benefit from direct input and feedback on their scientific writing and oral presentation skills as they complete senior experience projects and papers. Successful completion of BIOL 650 includes participation in BioFest, a symposium of biology senior experience projects during spring term.
Units: 1 OR 5.
Prerequisite: Major in biology or biochemistry, or in neuroscience with departmental approval; and senior class standing or departmental approval

CHEM 680: Senior Seminar

A seminar course for senior majors, culminating in an individual seminar presentation by each student.
Units: 3.

Biology

Professors:B. De Stasio (Dennis and Charlot Nelson Singleton Professor of Biological Sciences, chair), E. De Stasio (The Raymond H. Herzog Professor of Science)
Associate professors:K. Dickson, J. Humphries, J. Sedlock (on leave term(s) I, II, III), N. Wall
Assistant professors:I. Del Toro, A. Hakes, B. Piasecki
Visiting assistant professor:R. Ribbons (Freshman Studies)
Lecturer:C. Duckert

Students come to Lawrence with varied interests in the life sciences, thus course offerings in biology span the breadth of this exciting discipline and the biology major is flexible. Though each student may create a unique path to completing a major in biology, we encourage students to sample courses across the breadth of the field, including courses in ecology, organismal biology, and molecular genetics. The flexibility of the major allows students to include off-campus study into the undergraduate experience, whether that be the Lawrence Marine Term or an experience that does not include the study of biology.

The department encourages an open-ended, original, experimental approach to life science. The research-rich approach begins in BIOL 130: Integrative Biology: Cells to Organisms, in which all department faculty members participate. Students design, conduct, and interpret their own research projects and present their results at a professional-style symposium at the end of the term. The second course, BIOL 150, includes three open-ended research modules in the laboratory portion of the course while the third course has students focused on experimental design and statistical analysis of data.

Experimental work becomes progressively more sophisticated and creative in advanced courses. All courses are designed to develop students’ insights and capacity to synthesize information, and they include discussions, readings, field trips, lab work, and interactive class work in those areas most closely related to the competence of the faculty. Most courses feature intensive laboratory or field instruction in which students use advanced research equipment to explore modern biological concepts.

All biology faculty members conduct active research programs and employ students during the summer as research assistants as well as supervise students undertaking independent study research for credit during the academic year. Motivated students may approach faculty about laboratory or field research after their first or second year of study. Many students culminate their work in biology with significant original research. In recent years, several papers with students and faculty as co-authors have been published in professional journals. Topics have included aquatic food chain energetics, host-parasite and plant/animal interactions, gene expression, and molecular mechanisms of vertebrate development. Recent advances in biological research are presented in a series of talks by faculty and by scientists from other universities. All students complete a project (research, curriculum development, outreach, or a creative project) of their own design as part of our Senior Experience program and they present their work at our annual BioFest celebration of Senior Experience (see below for more details).

Students who have strong secondary interests in chemistry, geology, or physics may construct majors involving biology and one of the other three natural sciences, using the interdisciplinary major in the natural sciences or the biochemistry major.

Required for the biology major

  1. BIOL 130, 150, and 170
  2. CHEM 116
  3. At least seven six-unit courses in biology numbered 200 or above (excluding Senior Experience courses), of which at least five must be laboratory courses
  4. Completion of Biology Senior Experience (A student-directed project, 6 units of BIOL 650, 2 units of BIOL 600)
    Note: Only two six-unit courses designated as tutorial, directed study, or independent study can be counted toward the major or minor requirements and only one of those can be counted toward the upper-level laboratory requirement.

Required for the biology minor

  1. BIOL 130, 150, and 170. Students majoring in disciplines requiring a research methods and statistics course may request exemption from the BIOL 170 requirement.
  2. At least four six-unit courses in biology numbered 200 or above, of which at least two must be laboratory courses.
  3. C average in the minor
    Note: Only two six-unit courses designated as tutorial, directed study, or independent study can be counted toward the major or minor requirements and only one of these can be counted toward the upper-level laboratory requirement.

Required for the interdisciplinary major in the natural sciences in biology and physics or geology

  1. BIOL 130, 150, and 170
  2. PHYS 141 and 151 or 151 and 160
  3. GEOL 110 and GEOL 210, if geology is the secondary discipline.
  4. At least 10 six-unit courses in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, geology, and physics) numbered 200 or above, with at least five in biology (of which at least three must be laboratory courses), and at least three in the secondary discipline in other departments
  5. Completion of the Biology Senior Experience
  6. Note: The interdisciplinary combinations of biology and chemistry have been replaced by the Biochemistry major.

Wisconsin Teacher Certification

Students who major in biology and who wish to gain certification to teach biology in Wisconsin public schools should choose a broad range of biology courses that includes ecology, plant and animal organismal biology, as well as molecular and cellular biology. Students should gain experience in both field and laboratory research. Beyond the coursework required for the biology major, students will need to take the following additional courses:

  • One 6-unit geology course
  • One 6-unit physics course
  • EDST 180: Psychology of Learning
  • EDST 350: Ethnicity, Cultural Diversity, and Education
  • EDST 440: Sociology of Education
  • EDUC 560: Methods in Middle and Secondary Teaching
  • EDUC 430: Educating All Learners
  • EDUC 650: Student Teaching
  • EDUC 660: Student Teaching Seminar
For more detailed information about the certification program refer to the course of study for the Department of Education.

Senior Experience in Biology

Required: A student-designed project, 6 units of BIOL 650, 2 units of BIOL 600.
Purposeful advising in the spring of the sophomore year and attendance at the spring BioFest is meant to inspire sophomore students to think about what they might want to undertake as their culminating project in biology. During the fall of the junior year, students will hear from department faculty, the internship coordinator, and others about opportunities available for senior experience projects at a weekend retreat. Breakout groups allow students to brainstorm project ideas. Project work (research, internship, creation of a curricular module, draft of a grant proposal, draft of a children's book on biology, production of art about biology, or other creative project) generally will be undertaken prior to term 2 of the senior year and may be based on an internship, summer or academic year research, a tutorial, course work, independent study, or other student activities.

Usually in the senior year, students will take two terms of BIOL 600: Recent Advances in Biology Lecture Series (1 unit each), one term of BIOL 650 (5 units) in the winter term and 1 additional unit of BIOL 650 in the spring term for BioFest. The purpose of the BIOL 650 course is to bring to culmination each student’s individual senior experience project and to place that project in an academic context. Each student prepares a paper that places her or his project into a biological context, compares it to our past and current understanding of the topic using primary literature, and summarizes the student’s project or results. Students will begin gathering and organizing academic resources for this paper in the term 1 BIOL 600 course. In BIOL 650, students preparing a thesis for honors will prepare a significant portion of their thesis, while a student creating a visual product or curriculum will describe the biological underpinnings of the work and reflect on the production of the work itself, for example. The senior experience will culminate with a symposium, BioFest, in the spring term, at which all students will present the results of their projects (or the project itself) as a poster, demonstration, or other visual display.

Courses - Biology

BIOL 100: The Biology of Human Reproduction

An introductory course focusing on human reproduction to demonstrate some basic biological principles. The course includes discussion of cellular and organismal processes related to the development of human biological complexity. Current research in reproductive biology and its impact on the individual and society is considered. Lecture and laboratory. Primarily for non-science majors; credit not applicable to the biology major.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 180

BIOL 103: Biotechnology and Society

An examination of basic biological principles underlying current biotechnology in the fields of human genetics and genetic engineering. Discussion of methods of basic scientific research, the impact of technology on society, and ethical problems in human and agricultural genetics. Credit not applicable to biology major. Weekly laboratories will introduce basic experimental methodology and procedures.
Units: 6.

BIOL 130: Integrative Biology: Cells to Organisms

An exploration of fundamental cellular processes in an evolutionary context including homeostasis, cell cycle, gene expression, energy transformation, inheritance, and multi-cellular development. Experimental approaches will be emphasized. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.

BIOL 150: Integrative Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems

Development, morphology, physiology, and ecology of plants, animals, fungi and unicellular organisms will be compared in evolutionary context. Phylogenic relationships, ecological interactions, and ecosystem processes will be explored. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 or departmental examination

BIOL 170: Integrative Biology: Experimental Design and Statistics

An introduction to experimental and sampling design in the fields of biology and biochemistry, as well as methods of data analysis and interpretation. The connection between statistical analysis and experimental design will be emphasized. Topics include descriptive, exploratory, and confirmatory statistical analyses. Lecture and computer laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or consent of instructor

BIOL 191: Directed Study in Biology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIOL 200: Animal Behavior

A lecture and field-study course examining the principles and problems of animal behavior. Subjects include orientation, feeding, locomotion, communication, escape in time and space, biological rhythms, mate choice, and aspects of social behavior, examined from evolutionary, ontogenetic, physiological, ecological, and ethological perspectives. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 210
Prerequisite: BIOL 150

BIOL 211: Botany

An introduction to the study of plants with an emphasis on their structure, development, physiology, and diversity. Although this course is lecture-based, students will frequently interact with plants from the Lawrence University greenhouse.
Units: 6.

BIOL 221: Entomology

Topics covered will include a survey of all of the clades of insects with information on the systematics, diversity, ecology, life history, behavior and unique characteristics of each lineage. Lecture material will be augmented with required field trips to collect local species (terrestrial and aquatic) and the creation of a personal collection of species following the format as is customary for museum collections.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and sophomore standing

BIOL 222: Parasitology

Students will examine and compare the complex life cycles of a variety of parasites, including those of medical and veterinary importance. Specific topics covered within the course will include: parasite biochemistry, ecology, parasite evasion of the host immune system, host immune responses, and host behavior. The laboratory component of the course will include both live and preserved specimens.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150

BIOL 226: Microbiology

A study of microbial life with an emphasis on prokaryotes. Microbial physiology is examined in the context of how unique characteristics allow microbes to exploit a vast diversity of environments, including the human body. Laboratory exercises introduce students to techniques used to safely study microorganisms.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and BIOL 150, CHEM 116 recommended

BIOL 229: General Ecology (Lecture Only)

An introduction to the interactions between organisms and the environment. Explores the role of physical, chemical and biotic processes--including human activities--in determining the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Topics include resource availability, competition, predation, symbiosis and natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as disease, biological invasions, pollution and climate change. Lecture only.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 229

BIOL 230: General Ecology

An introduction to the interactions between organisms and the environment. Explores the role of physical, chemical and biotic processes--including human activities--in determining the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Topics include resource availability, competition, predation, symbiosis and natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as disease, biological invasions, pollution and climate change. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 220

BIOL 235: Evolutionary Biology

A study of biological evolution, including natural selection, adaptation, the evolution of sex, speciation, extinction, and constraints on evolutionary change. Reading primary literature is emphasized. Two lectures and one discussion per week.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 213
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 or ANTH 140

BIOL 240: Morphogenesis of the Vertebrates

An integrated lecture and laboratory course that undertakes the study of the structure and function of vertebrate organ systems through examination of morphology. Vertebrate ontogeny, phylogeny, and anatomy are addressed.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150

BIOL 242: Comparative Physiology

A comparative study of the variety of solutions and adaptations diverse animals can make to similar problems — obtaining and transporting oxygen, maintaining water and salt balance, utilizing food, movement, and nervous and hormonal integration. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150

BIOL 245: Conservation Biology

This course explores scientific concepts related to the conservation and restoration of Earth's biological diversity. Topics include patterns of species and ecosystem diversity, the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, causes of extinction, assessing extinction risk, behavioral indicators, in-situ and ex-situ management strategies for endangered species, and ecosystem restoration. Lecture only.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 245
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and sophomore standing

BIOL 260: Genetics

A lecture and laboratory study of the principles of inheritance, gene expression, introductory genomics, sex determination, and the concepts of historical and modern eugenics and genetic engineering.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and BIOL 130 and BIOL 170 (or concurrent enrollment) or ANTH 140

BIOL 265: Biogeochemistry

This course explores fundamental cycles between earth's major reservoirs of nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon and water. Through lecture and group presentations, students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamentals of biogeochemical cycles and the mechanism underlying the biological transformations of those elements. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 265, Geology 265
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 or GEOL 110

BIOL 310: Human Anatomy

A course in human anatomy only intended for students entering the allied health professions (e.g. nursing, PA, PT, athletic training) or forensic anthropology. Students learn detailed anatomy using full-size human models. Students are expected to learn structures of the skeletal, muscular, nervous (sensory included), circulatory, digestive, respiratory, urogenital, and endocrine systems. Emphasis is on the anatomy, particularly in the laboratory component of the course, but basic physiology is also covered.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or ANTH 140

BIOL 325: Cell Biology

Survey of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells, the basic functional unit of life. Correlation of cellular structures including organelles, proteins, and membranes with functions such as cellular communication, division, transport, movement, and secretory pathways will be analyzed. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and BIOL 150, BIOL 170 recommended

BIOL 330: Aquatic Ecology

The principles of the ecology of fresh waters, developed through discussions, laboratory, and field investigations of the functional relationships and productivity of biotic communities as they are affected by the dynamics of physical, chemical, and biotic parameters. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 310
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 170 (or concurrent enrollment) or BIOL 230

BIOL 335: Plant Ecology

This course emphasizes core concepts in ecology and evolution from the unique perspective of plants. Students will explore the interactions between plants and their environment over a range of scales; from individuals to populations and communities. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 340
Prerequisite: BIOL 170

BIOL 340: Topics in Neuroscience

A study of the nervous system from the perspectives of psychology and biology. Topics vary year to year and may include glial cells, neural development, and the evolution of nervous systems and neurotransmitter systems. Lecture only. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2019: Viral Vectors in the Central Nervous System
Viral vectors are exciting tools currently used in the field of gene therapy and in basic neuroscience research to further understand neurobiological processes. Using primary research and review articles as a basis, this course will explore the history of viral vectors, advancements in their design, the therapeutic potential of vectors for CNS disorders and the adverse effects, including biological, environmental and ethical issues, associated with them. Course format includes discussions, presentations, group work and writing assignments.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 580
Prerequisite: CHEM 116, BIOL 150, and one course in psychology; or PSYC 360 and one course in biology; or consent of instructor

BIOL 345: Terrestrial Field Ecology

A hands-on course intended to demonstrate basic ecological principles using local terrestrial ecosystems. Field research projects will introduce students to methods in hypothesis development, experimental design, data collection, statistical analysis, and scientific writing and presentation. Research topics will include estimating population size, community structure, plant-animal interactions, and foraging behavior. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 345
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 170, and sophomore standing

BIOL 354: Molecular Biology

An interdisciplinary examination of regulatory mechanisms leading to differential gene expression. Main topics include transcription, translation, gene and protein structure, and modern genomics. The application of current molecular techniques is emphasized throughout the course. Laboratory work is experimental in approach. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and CHEM 115

BIOL 360: Introduction to Bioinformatics

An introduction to the methods and software used to analyze biological data. Through lecture and guided tutorials, students will learn the structure and organization of biological databases, explore methods for examining genomic and proteomic data sets, and examine specific case studies relating to evolution, drug discovery and human variation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 260

BIOL 370: Human Physiology

An examination of how the body maintains homeostasis. The various physiological systems (e.g., respiratory and cardiovascular) will be studied at multiple levels of organization, from molecular and cellular to the macroscopic. This course is primarily aimed at students entering the health sciences. The course will have both lectures and a laboratory component.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150

BIOL 380: Ecological Modeling

An integrated lecture and computer laboratory introduction to the process of developing mathematical descriptions of the interactions between components of a population, community, or ecosystem, and the use of computer simulation as a tool for understanding ecology and natural resource management. Topics include population growth, predator-prey and competitor interactions, biogeochemical cycling, and mass balance in ecosystems.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 380
Prerequisite: At least one of the following: BIOL 229, BIOL 230, BIOL 245, BIOL 330, BIOL 335 or BIOL 345

BIOL 390: Tutorial Studies in Biology

Individual investigations of problems in biology.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

BIOL 391: Directed Study in Biology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIOL 399: Independent Study in Biology

Individual, in-depth investigation of a specific biological problem. Students contemplating an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

BIOL 420: The Geography of Life: Biodiversity in a Changing Planet

Earth is a dynamic and changing planet, comprised of tightly linked ecosystems and organisms. In this course we explore relationships between the biotic and abiotic drivers that influence the distribution of global diversity. We use large-scale datasets to develop practical skills for monitoring the responses of biodiversity to environmental change.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 420
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and BIOL 170; preferred but not required: BIOL 230 and BIOL 235

BIOL 430: Immunology

This course will cover the basic concepts of immunology, including differentiation of immune cells, antibody structure and function, antigen-antibody reactions, the major-histocompatibility complex, the complement system, immune responses to pathogens, allergies and auto-immune diseases, and comparative immunology. The course will also examine recent advances in the field through current peer-reviewed publications. The weekly laboratory will examine the basic questions, experimental subjects, and procedures of the field.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130, BIOL 150, and junior standing; or consent of instructor

BIOL 431: Immunology (lecture only)

This course will cover the basic concepts of immunology, including differentiation of immune cells, antibody structure and function, antigen-antibody reactions, the major-histocompatibility complex, the complement system, immune responses to pathogens, allergies and auto-immune diseases and comparative immunology. The course will also examine recent advances in the field through current peer-reviewed publications. Lecture only.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor

BIOL 434: Ecological Energetics

Field and laboratory experimental investigations of the transfer and transformation of energy or energy-containing materials between and within organisms and populations of aquatic ecosystems. Part of the Marine Biology Term. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 410
Prerequisite: BIOL 330, concurrent enrollment in BIOL 505 and 226 and consent of instructor

BIOL 444: Biochemistry I

An introduction to the study of biological processes at the molecular level with emphases on protein struction and function, enzyme mechanism and kinetics, fundamentals of physical biochemistry, and the chemistry of biological molecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chemistry 340
Prerequisite: CHEM 250 or concurrent enrollment, or consent of instructor

BIOL 450: Special Topics in Biology

A course designed to offer students an opportunity to study important issues in biology not covered in other regularly offered classes. Activities may include reading and analysis of material from primary literature, consideration of interdisciplinary connections, and field and laboratory activities.

Topic for Winter 2019: Cell Biology
Survey of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells, the basic functional unit of life. Correlation of cellular structures including organelles, proteins, and membranes with functions such as cellular communication, division, transport, movement, and secretory pathways will be analyzed. Lecture and primary literature discussions
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 and BIOL 150, or consent of instructor

BIOL 453: Developmental Biology

An experimental approach to animal development with laboratory and lecture emphasis on molecular and cellular processes of embryogenesis. Includes discussions of pattern formation, differentiation, cell interactions, gametogenesis and fertilization. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150; and one of the following (or concurrent enrollment): BIOL 354, BIOL 444/CHEM 340, BIOL 260, or BIOL 325

BIOL 455: Biochemistry II

A continuation of Biochemistry I. A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on metabolic pathways, recent advances in biochemical medicine, and biochemical aspects of gene replication, protein synthesis, molecular motors, and sensing. The course is divided between lecture and discussion and will rely heavily on current biochemical literature.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chemistry 440
Prerequisite: CHEM 340 or consent of instructor

BIOL 465: Advanced Biotechnology

An advanced course that examines the ways in which fundamental principles of biochemistry and molecular biology are transformed into technologies that revolutionize basic science, industrial processes, medicine, and agriculture. Lectures, discussions and laboratory work will focus on current primary literature and novel research questions.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 340, BIOL 354, or consent of instructor

BIOL 505: Coral Reef Environments

Examines the ecology of coral reef environments. Lecture, laboratory, and field components. Part of the Marine Biology Term. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 505
Prerequisite: BIOL 330 and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 226 and BIOL 434

BIOL 570: Biological Physics

Develops and explores the physical principles underlying biological systems, with a particular emphasis on building quantitative models. Applies fundamental topics including thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, elasticity, and electrostatics to model molecular and cellular phenomena such as gene expression, virus assembly, DNA bending and stretching, and nerve impulses.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Physics 570
Prerequisite: PHYS 151, and one of PHYS 230, CHEM 252, CHEM 340, or BIOL 354

BIOL 590: Tutorial Studies in Biology

Individual investigations of problems in biology.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

BIOL 591: Directed Study in Biology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIOL 599: Independent Study in Biology

Individual, in-depth investigation of a specific biological problem. Students contemplating an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

BIOL 600: Recent Advances in Biology Seminar

A multidisciplinary lecture series on modern biological theory and research. Students attend seminars and prepare short summaries or “reaction papers” on topics covered. Biology faculty members and visiting scientists in biological and allied fields present seminars relating their research to the broader aspects of their disciplines. Topics discussed within any academic year provide a comprehensive exposure to the current frontiers of biological research. May be repeated for a maximum of three units.
Units: 1.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and declared major in biology, or consent of instructor

BIOL 650: Biology Senior Capstone

Senior capstone in which students will benefit from direct input and feedback on their scientific writing and oral presentation skills as they complete senior experience projects and papers. Successful completion of BIOL 650 includes participation in BioFest, a symposium of biology senior experience projects during spring term.
Units: 1 OR 5.
Prerequisite: Major in biology or biochemistry, or in neuroscience with departmental approval; and senior class standing or departmental approval

BIOL 690: Tutorial Studies in Biology

Individual investigations of problems in biology.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

BIOL 691: Directed Study in Biology

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIOL 699: Independent Study in Biology

Individual, in-depth investigation of a specific biological problem. Students contemplating an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

Biomedical Ethics

Professor:E. De Stasio (The Raymond H. Herzog Professor of Science Biology)
Associate professors:M. Ansfield (Psychology), B. Jenike (Edward F. Mielke Professor of Ethics in Medicine, Science and Society Anthropology, chair), M. Jenike (Anthropology)
Assistant professors:I. Albrecht (Philosophy) (on leave term(s) III), H. Caruthers (Economics), D. Fitz (Economics), J. Smith (Ethnic Studies)

The minor in biomedical ethics is designed to coordinate a student’s background and interests in biomedical ethics, health care public policy, and the biological sciences with a variety of more specialized approaches to the study and application of relevant principles, insights, and understandings gleaned from those backgrounds and interests. This minor has been designed to appeal to Lawrence students planning further work in medicine, nursing, genetic counseling, public health, and other areas of study in or related to health care.

Required for the minor in biomedical ethics

  1. Completion of the following core courses:
    1. BIET 120/PHIL 120: Applied Ethics: Introduction to Biomedical Ethics
    2. BIOL 110: Principles of Biology, BIOL 103: Biotechnology and Society, or ANTH 140: Biological Anthropology
    3. BIET 290/ECON 290: The Economics of Medical Care or BIET 495/GOV 495: Health Policy
    4. PSYC 245: Health Psychology or ANTH 342: Medical Anthropology
    5. BIET 370/PHIL 370: Advanced Studies in Bioethics, BIET 380/PHIL 380: Ethics of Technology or an approved independent study project on some aspect of biomedical ethics or health policy.
  2. 12 additional units from the courses listed below Independent study projects must be approved by the advisory committee. Possible contexts for projects include a Mielke, Kasel, or Hughes internship (page 65 of the Course Catalog), a tutorial, an independent study course, or a health care-related project in conjunction with an off-campus program.

Courses that fulfill requirement number two

  • ANTH210: Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology
  • ANTH 342: Medical Anthropology
  • BIOL 260: Genetics
  • BIOL 354: Molecular Biology
  • BIOL 453: Developmental Biology
  • ECON 270: Public Sector Economics: Taxation Analysis
  • ECON 275: Public Sector Economics: Expenditure Analysis
  • ECON 290: The Economics of Medical Care
  • ECON 400: Industrial Organization
  • ECON 440: Public Expenditure
  • GEOL 213: Geology and Health
  • GOV 380: Introduction to Public Policy
  • GOV 465: Environmental Politics
  • GOV 495: Health Policy
  • PHIL 320: Ethics
  • PHIL 350: Political Philosophy
  • PHIL 360: Environmental Ethics
  • PHIL 365: Compassion and Other Virtues
  • PHIL 370: Advanced Studies in Bioethics
  • PHIL 380: Ethics of Technology
  • PHIL 430: Philosophy of Law
  • PSYC 245: Health Psychology
  • PSYC 250: Psychopathology
  • PSYC 280 or 281: Research Methods I and II (only one term may count)

Courses - Biomedical Ethics

BIET 120: Applied Ethics: Introduction to Biomedical Ethics

The course will examine moral dilemmas created or intensified by recent advances in medical technology and study ways of analyzing those dilemmas to make them more tractable. We will focus on examples such as euthanasia and the right to die, abortion, behavior modification, allocation of scarce medical resources, in vitro fertilization, genetic screening and engineering, and human experimentation.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 120
Prerequisite: Recommended for freshmen and sophomores

BIET 191: Directed Study in Biomedical Ethics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIET 245: Health Psychology

This course explores the link between mind and body from various psychological perspectives such as social, clinical, and psychobiological. We will survey the role of stress, emotion, self-regulation, and individual differences as predictors of health and illness. We also will examine assessment, diagnostic, treatment, and ethical issues in psychophysiological disorders.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 245
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or sophomore standing

BIET 290: The Economics of Medical Care

An analysis of how the economic organization of medical care affects the health and well-being of the population. Topics include who is treated, how much the treatment costs, and who pays the bill. Particular emphasis given to the roles of insurance and various national health policies and reform proposals.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Economics 290
Prerequisite: ECON 100

BIET 291: Health Policy: U.S. & U.K.

This course compares U.K. and U.S. health systems, markets, and public health policies. In particular, the course will analyze trade-offs made in each country among access to care, the cost of care and the quality of care as well as how resources are generated and allocated for each system.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Economics 291
Prerequisite: Only open to students attending the London Centre.

BIET 370: Advanced Studies in Bioethics

A seminar examining one particular issue or set of issues in bioethics.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 370
Prerequisite: PHIL 120 or two courses in philosophy

BIET 380: Ethics of Technology

This course focuses on ethical issues that arise from the development of new technology. Specific topics may include artificial intelligence, information technologies, human enhancement, transhumanism, transgenesis, ectogenesis, nanoethics, and neuroethics.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 380
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, junior standing, or consent of the instructor

BIET 390: Tutorial Studies in Biomedical ethics

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIET 391: Directed Study in Biomedical Ethics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIET 399: Independent Study in Biomedical ethics

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIET 590: Tutorial Studies in Biomedical ethics

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIET 591: Directed Study in Biomedical Ethics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIET 599: Independent Study in Biomedical ethics

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIET 690: Tutorial Studies in Biomedical ethics

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIET 691: Directed Study in Biomedical Ethics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

BIET 699: Independent Study in Biomedical ethics

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Chemistry

Associate professors:S. Debbert, D. Hall (chair)
Assistant professors:D. Donohoue, A. Fleshman, G. Sazama
Instructor:M. Clement

Chemists, biochemists, and chemical engineers contribute to the development and utilization of the materials, medicines, foods, and fuels that are the hallmarks of modern life. They also contribute to the understanding and protection of the natural environment. Working in concert with biologists, geologists, physicists, psychologists, and others, chemists work toward the solution of many of society’s most pressing problems -- challenges to physical and mental health, pollution and its effects, resource recovery, and energy production and conservation among them.

The American Chemical Society certified chemistry major at Lawrence prepares students for a broad range of opportunities and careers, including academic or industrial research, engineering, secondary or college teaching, medical or veterinary practice, law, business, or public service.

The Lawrence chemistry department is large enough to ensure that all the major areas of chemistry are well represented, yet small enough that students can build close working relationships with all the faculty members. Our department's faculty are all actively engaged in their own research programs, primarily using Lawrence’s own wide array of instrumentation; these programs create ample independent research opportunities for students, either during the school year or the summer months. We see these research experiences as a critical part of our curriculum, as they provide students with the analytical techniques, problem-solving strategies, and critical thinking skills necessary for success in the physical, medical or life sciences. Our goals are to engage students from diverse backgrounds with the excitement of chemistry; foster in them the habit of informed and critical thinking; involve them in independent learning and research; and prepare them for the successful pursuit of a wide variety of post-baccalaureate and professional opportunities.

The chemistry major

Advanced Placement

Students who have had the equivalent of a college general chemistry course are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in Chemistry administered by the Educational Testing Service. Students with sufficiently high AP exam scores will receive six units of college credit for CHEM 115, and will typically be advised to enroll in CHEM 116.

Students that have not taken or passed the AP Chemistry exam may also be placed in CHEM 116, depending on their score on our online placement test; in this case, no course credit for CHEM 115 would be awarded. In any case, instructor approval is required for our general chemistry courses, and students are encouraged to reach out to a chemistry faculty member with any questions about the courses.

Required for the chemistry major

  1. Introductory principles
    • CHEM 115 and 116 or the equivalent
    • MATH 140 and 150, or the equivalent
    • PHYS 141 and 151
  2. Core competencies
    • CHEM 210: Analytical chemistry
    • CHEM 250: Organic chemistry I
    • CHEM 252: Organic chemistry II
    • CHEM 320: Inorganic chemistry
    • CHEM 340: Biochemistry
    • CHEM 370: Physical chemistry I
    • Four additional classes. At least three must be Chemistry classes at or above the 400 level, and at least one of those three must be a class in physical chemistry. One class in another natural science department, if it has significant chemistry content (such as a course in molecular biology), may be counted as one of the four electives with departmental approval.
  3. Six units of credit earned in Chemistry Senior experience courses numbered 380, 480, and 680
  4. C average in the major

Required for the chemistry minor

  1. Introductory principles
    • CHEM 115 and 116 or the equivalent
  2. Core competencies
    • CHEM 210: Analytical chemistry
    • CHEM 250: Organic chemistry I
    • CHEM 320: Inorganic chemistry
    • CHEM 370: Physical Chemistry I
    • Two additional chemistry classes, one of which must be at or above the 400 level.
  3. At least three units of credit earned in Chemistry Seminar courses numbered 380, 480, and 680
  4. C average in the minor

Required for the interdisciplinary major in the natural sciences in chemistry and physics or geology

Chemistry students who have strong secondary interests in physics or geology may construct a major involving chemistry and geology or physics, using the interdisciplinary major in the natural sciences. Previous interdisciplinary combinations of biology and chemistry have been replaced by the biochemistry major.
The requirements for the interdisciplinary major with chemistry as the primary discipline are:

  1. Introductory course sequences in chemistry, physics, and geology, chosen to include the discipline of secondary interest. The introductory sequences are:
    • CHEM 115 and 116 or the equivalent
    • GEOL 110 and 210
    • PHYS 141 and 151
  2. Intermediate/Advanced Requirement: At least 10 six-unit courses in the sciences (biology, chemistry, geology, physics) numbered 200 or above, with at least five in chemistry and at least three in the secondary discipline.
  3. Six units of credit earned in Chemistry Seminar courses numbered 380, 480, and 680

Senior Experience in Chemistry

The Chemistry Department's capstone sequence consists of a series of 3 seminars:

  • CHEM 380: Seminar - Perspectives on Chemistry (Fall Term, 1 unit) Taken optimally by sophomores or juniors, this is a series of presentations by visiting chemists and Lawrence students, faculty, and staff, featuring current issues in chemistry, important applications of chemistry, and professional development topics appropriate to chemistry majors or minors, intended to introduce students to "life after Lawrence" early enough in college to affect their trajectories through the college curriculum. This course covers the major career destinations for chemistry students, of graduate school, health professions, chemical engineering, K-12 teaching, and the chemical industry.
  • CHEM 480: Seminar: Chemical Literature (Winter Term, 2 units) A seminar course for chemistry majors and minors, taken optimally during the junior year, in which students learn how to educate themselves about the chemical literature in a field of interest to them. In this seminar, they learn the character and organization of the chemical literature and become familiar with search strategies, as each selects a topic and, guided by the instructor, conducts a literature search for key papers on that topic, constructs a bibliography, reads several of the most important of the papers, and prepares an end-of-term presentation highlighting key research findings related to their chosen topic. Students are encouraged to correlate their activities in this seminar with research projects that they undertake at Lawrence or elsewhere, which form the basis of the Senior Seminar.
  • CHEM 680: Senior Seminar (Spring Term, 3 units): The culminating course in our capstone sequence asks each major to present an individual seminar presentation based on research they have done at Lawrence or elsewhere. 3 units.

Students are strongly encouraged to consult with their advisors and relevant department chairs to plan and negotiate their overall capstone experience as early as possible.

Courses - Chemistry

CHEM 108: The Chemistry of Art

A study of the chemistry underlying topics of interest to artists and art historians. Topics may include: papermaking; pigments, dyes, and binders; photography; glass and ceramics; metals; and printmaking. The course is designed for all students. Combined lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.

CHEM 115: Principles of Chemistry: Structure and Reactivity

Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry, emphasizing structures of chemical species (atoms, ions, and molecules), stoichiometry, the relationships between structure and reactivity, basic chemical models (gas laws, e. g.) and laboratory skills. This course will serve primarily to prepare students who have not had any previous (high school) coursework in chemistry for CHEM 116. Three lectures and one laboratory session each week. Students with high school chemistry should normally take 116 instead of this course. See the chemistry department's web page for placement examination information.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Placement examination

CHEM 116: Principles of Chemistry: Energetics and Dynamics

Introduction to the study of chemistry, for students who have taken high school chemistry or CHEM 115, emphasizing structural and quantitative models of chemical behavior. Topics include bonding, thermochemistry, equilibrium, kinetics, and related applications. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Enrollment is determined by placement examination for students who have not completed CHEM 115. See the chemistry department's web page for placement examination information.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 115 or placement examination

CHEM 191: Directed Study in Chemistry

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHEM 195: Internship in Chemistry

An opportunity to connect work experiences in industry, government, or the non-profit sector to the academic program in chemistry. Internships, either summer activities or full- or part-time work experiences during the academic year, are arranged by students in consultation with a Lawrence instructor. In each case, the academic credit (and grading) is based on related readings, discussion with the instructor, and a summary report, plus a presentation on campus, usually in the chemistry seminar series. Advance consultation and application is required, normally by the fifth week of the previous term.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; Counter Registration Required

CHEM 210: Analytical Chemistry

A course in the quantitative description of chemical equilibria in solution (acid-base, complexation, redox, solubility) using classical, separation, electrochemical, and spectrochemical methods of analysis. This course covers methods of quantification, statistics, and data analysis as applied to modern chemistry. Students will have the opportunity to individually design projects. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 250
Prerequisite: CHEM 116, placement exam, or consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in CHEM 211 required

CHEM 211: Statistical Methods in Analytical Chemistry

This course covers methods of statistics and data analysis as applied to modern chemistry. Students in this course will develop a working knowledge of the basic and advanced capabilities of the spreadsheet program Microsoft Excel. Topics explored include descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, and tests of significance. This course is taught in a exercise-oriented approach where we use real data collected during CHEM 210.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: CHEM 116, placement exam, or consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in CHEM 210 is required

CHEM 212: Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry

This course focuses on the fundamental chemical processes that control Earth's atmosphere, ocean, soil, and climate. The course emphasizes the mechanisms that regulate the flow of energy in different ecosystems, the environmental role of particulate matter and solar radiation, chemistry-climate relationships, and the anthropogenic impact on the environment.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 222
Prerequisite: CHEM 116

CHEM 225: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

This course provides an introduction to the novelty, challenge, and excitement of nanoscale science and technology. Emphasis on the physical and chemical properties and phenomena at the nanoscale and their influence in chemistry, biochemistry, and environmental chemistry. Opportunities for individually designed projects. No formal laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: At least one introductory course sequence in either chemistry (115, 116) or physics (150, 160 or 120, 130)

CHEM 250: Organic Chemistry I

A study of the relationship between structure and function in organic compounds. Basic topics such as molecular orbital theory, conformational equilibria, stereochemistry, and nucleophilic substitution are covered. Students also learn to use instrumental analysis (NMR, IR, GC-MS) to identify and characterize compounds. One four-hour laboratory per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 116 or 119 or consent of instructor

CHEM 252: Organic Chemistry II

A study of organic reactions and their mechanisms. The focus of the class is synthesis, both in the concrete sense of building molecules and in the abstract sense of pulling together disparate concepts to solve problems. Case studies from the polymer and pharmaceutical industries underline the relevance of the discipline to everyday life. One four-hour laboratory per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 250

CHEM 320: Inorganic Chemistry

A survey of structures, properties, reactivities, and interrelationships of chemical elements and their compounds. Topics include unifying principles and concepts that enable the interpretation of experimental data associated with materials. Emphasis on multidisciplinary aspects of inorganic chemistry. Lectures and weekly laboratory. Laboratory projects involve synthesis and studies of compounds using a variety of experimental methods.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 250

CHEM 340: Biochemistry I

An introduction to the study of biological processes at the molecular level with emphases on protein struction and function, enzyme mechanism and kinetics, fundamentals of physical biochemistry, and the chemistry of biological molecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 444
Prerequisite: CHEM 250 or concurrent enrollment, or consent of instructor

CHEM 350: Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry

Bioorganic chemistry is the study of the organic chemistry underlying biological processes; topics such as the organic chemistry of metabolic processes and the laboratory synthesis of biomolecules will be covered. We will also study the organic chemistry of drug discovery and development, guided by both pharmaceutical case studies and modern medicinal chemistry literature.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 252 or consent of instructor

CHEM 370: Physical Chemistry I: Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Develops and explores theoretical descriptions of chemical systems: physical states, the laws of thermodynamics as applied to chemical and physical equilibria, chemical reaction kinetics, and catalysis. No laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 150, PHYS 150, CHEM 116; or consent of instructor

CHEM 380: Seminar: Perspectives on Chemistry

A series of presentations by visiting chemists and Lawrence students, faculty, and staff, featuring current issues in chemistry, important applications of chemistry, and professional development topics appropriate to chemistry majors or minors. Approximately one meeting per week. Two or more short “reaction papers” (a short seminar critique or summary) required of each student. Offered annually in the Fall Term. May be repeated for credit.
Units: 1.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; offered annually in the Fall Term

CHEM 390: Tutorial Studies in Chemistry

Advanced reading and/or laboratory work in chemistry on topics not covered in regular offerings. Available to both majors and non-majors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHEM 391: Directed Study in Chemistry

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHEM 395: Internship in Chemistry

An opportunity to connect work experiences in industry, government, or the non-profit sector to the academic program in chemistry. Internships, either summer activities or full- or part-time work experiences during the academic year, are arranged by students in consultation with a Lawrence instructor. In each case, the academic credit (and grading) is based on related readings, discussion with the instructor, and a summary report, plus a presentation on campus, usually in the chemistry seminar series. Advance consultation and application is required, normally by the fifth week of the previous term.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; Counter Registration Required

CHEM 399: Independent Study in Chemistry

Original experimental or theoretical research in cooperation with a faculty member. Seniors considering an honors project should register for this course for one or more terms. Available to both majors and non-majors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHEM 410: Instrumental Analysis

An advanced course in instrumental methods of quantification and identification in modern chemistry. Emphasis on instrument design, operating principles, interpretation of instrumental data, and discrimination between techniques. This course focuses on spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical techniques and their application in fundamental and applied research. Students will have the opportunity to individually design projects. Three lectures and one laboratory per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 210 or consent of instructor

CHEM 420: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

A continuation of inorganic chemistry addressing cross-disciplinary topics such as organometallic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, nanosciences, inorganic spectroscopy, and main group chemistry, with examples drawn from the primary literature. The course is especially recommended for majors who plan to continue studies in graduate or professional school.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 252, CHEM 370 recommended

CHEM 440: Biochemistry II

A continuation of Biochemistry I. A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on metabolic pathways, recent advances in biochemical medicine, and biochemical aspects of gene replication, protein synthesis, molecular motors, and sensing. The course is divided between lecture and discussion and will rely heavily on current biochemical literature.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 455
Prerequisite: CHEM 340 or consent of instructor

CHEM 445: Biochemistry of Viruses

The advanced biochemical, molecular, epidemiological and biotechnological aspects of animal, bacterial and plant viruses will be covered in this course. Specific areas of virology will be covered, including viral structure and assembly, viral replication, viral recombination and evolution, virus-host interactions, viral transformations, antiviral drugs, and vaccines. Selected virus families are discussed individually with respect to classification, genomic structure, virion structure, virus cycle, pathogenesis, epidemiology and immunity.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 340 or BIOL 354

CHEM 450: Topics in Advanced Organic Chemistry

A study of modern topics in organic chemistry, emphasizing current literature. Topics may vary from year to year, but the class typically covers organic synthesis in depth. Students will often use the literature and their own expanding understanding of chemical reactivity to design synthetic routes to complex drugs and natural products. No formal laboratory; lab exercises may occasionally substitute for lectures.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 252 or consent of instructor

CHEM 470: Physical Chemistry II: Quantum Chemistry & Spectroscopy

Develops and explores theoretical methods and models for the quantum description of atoms and molecules as chemical systems; statistical methods that link the macroscopic and molecular levels of these descriptions are also explored, along with the treatment of deviations from equilibrium. No laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 150 and CHEM 370; or consent of instructor

CHEM 475: Spectroscopy

A study of the theory and practice of spectroscopy. Theoretical topics may include energy quantization, selection rules, and group theory. Experimental topics may include infrared, Raman, ultraviolet/visible, electron spin resonance, or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies and their applications. Two lectures and two laboratories per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHEM 370 or CHEM 470; or consent of instructor

CHEM 476: Physical Chemistry Laboratory

Students will use the laboratory setting to connect quantitative models with observed chemical phenomena using physical chemistry concepts. Lectures will guide students in analyzing their data, and developing the tools needed to communicate their results via research articles and presentations. Experimental topics include thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 150, PHYS 151, CHEM 370 or CHEM 470; or consent of instructor

CHEM 480: Seminar: Chemical Literature

A seminar course intended primarily for junior majors and minors in chemistry. Students learn the character and organization of the chemical literature and become familiar with search strategies, as each selects a topic and, guided by the instructor, conducts a literature search for key papers on that topic, constructs an annotated bibliography, reads several of the most important of the papers, and prepares an end-of-term presentation highlighting key research findings related to their chosen topic.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or consent of instructor

CHEM 570: Topics Advanced Physical Chem

A study of advanced physical chemistry topics that are not covered in CHEM 370, 470, and 476. Course will emphasize the physical theories that govern chemical phenomena. Topics may include spectroscopy, electrochemistry, computational chemistry, and polymer/materials chemistry. No formal laboratory, but lab exercises will occasionally substitute lectures. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 150 and CHEM 370 (CHEM 470 preferred), or consent of instructor

CHEM 590: Tutorial Studies in Chemistry

Advanced reading and/or laboratory work in chemistry on topics not covered in regular offerings. Available to both majors and non-majors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHEM 591: Directed Study in Chemistry

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHEM 595: Internship in Chemistry

An opportunity to connect work experiences in industry, government, or the non-profit sector to the academic program in chemistry. Internships, either summer activities or full- or part-time work experiences during the academic year, are arranged by students in consultation with a Lawrence instructor. In each case, the academic credit (and grading) is based on related readings, discussion with the instructor, and a summary report, plus a presentation on campus, usually in the chemistry seminar series. Advance consultation and application is required, normally by the fifth week of the previous term.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; Counter Registration Required

CHEM 599: Independent Study in Chemistry

Original experimental or theoretical research in cooperation with a faculty member. Seniors considering an honors project should register for this course for one or more terms. Available to both majors and non-majors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHEM 680: Senior Seminar

A seminar course for senior majors, culminating in an individual seminar presentation by each student.
Units: 3.

CHEM 690: Tutorial Studies in Chemistry

Advanced reading and/or laboratory work in chemistry on topics not covered in regular offerings. Available to both majors and non-majors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHEM 691: Directed Study in Chemistry

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHEM 695: Internship in Chemistry

An opportunity to connect work experiences in industry, government, or the non-profit sector to the academic program in chemistry. Internships, either summer activities or full- or part-time work experiences during the academic year, are arranged by students in consultation with a Lawrence instructor. In each case, the academic credit (and grading) is based on related readings, discussion with the instructor, and a summary report, plus a presentation on campus, usually in the chemistry seminar series. Advance consultation and application is required, normally by the fifth week of the previous term.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; Counter Registration Required

CHEM 699: Independent Study in Chemistry

Original experimental or theoretical research in cooperation with a faculty member. Seniors considering an honors project should register for this course for one or more terms. Available to both majors and non-majors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Chinese and Japanese

Associate professor:K. Sung (chair) (on leave term(s) I)
Instructors:A. Adler, Y. Chiu (Schmidt Fellow), Y. Makita, M. Wegehaupt (Dean of Faculty Office)

The Department of Chinese and Japanese provides students with a coherent study of a cultural region. This region primarily encompasses China, Japan, and Korea — countries that spring from a common historical experience and share many common values and traditions. Though language forms an important part of this study, the focus of the curriculum remains as much cultural as linguistic. Courses are thus taught in English as well as in East Asian languages.

Required for the Chinese language and literature major

  1. Completion of beginning and intermediate Chinese language courses: CHJA 101, 102, 201, 202, 203, 301
  2. Two six-unit courses in Chinese literature, taught in translation, selected from the following:
    • CHJA 260: East Asian Classics in Translation
    • CHJA 350: Modern Chinese Literature and Cinema in Translation
    • CHJA 520: Seminar in Chinese Literature
  3. Three six-unit courses in advanced Chinese, taught in Chinese:
    • CHJA 401: Advanced Communicative Chinese
    • CHJA 402: Advanced Readings in Chinese
    • CHJA 590: Tutorial Studies in Chinese or CHJA 598: Internship in Chinese
  4. One senior-level independent study, CHJA 699 (6 units)

Required for the Chinese language minor

  1. Completion of beginning and intermediate Chinese language courses: CHJA 101, 102, 201, 202, 203, and 301 or the equivalent
  2. One advanced language course
  3. An exit proficiency interview
  4. C average in the minor

Required for the Japanese language minor

  1. Completion of beginning and intermediate Japanese language courses: CHJA 111, 112, 211, 212, 213, and 311
  2. One advanced language course
  3. An exit proficiency interview
  4. C average in the minor

Advanced Placement

Students who have studied Chinese or Japanese in high school and who wish to study Chinese and Japanese beyond the beginning level are required to take a placement examination. They also are advised to consult with the department chair in order to ensure their proper placement in language classes.

International Study

Opportunities exist to study in both Chinese- and Japanese-speaking areas through an ACM program in Tokyo and the Associated Colleges in China Program in Beijing (see Off-Campus Programs).

Senior Experience in Chinese or Chinese and Japanese

CHJA 699: A senior level one-term independent study (6 units) culminating in the completion of a substantial paper or project derived from previous coursework in the discipline or related fields or field experience in consultation with department faculty. Students with sufficiently advanced Chinese language skills are encouraged to use some Chinese language sources in carrying out their research. Students must share the results of their work in a public forum prior to graduation.

Courses - Chinese and Japanese

CHJA 101: Beginning Chinese I

An introduction to elementary Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on the acquisition of basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with discussions to practice pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.

CHJA 102: Beginning Chinese II

A continuation of CHJA 101 with further practice in basic language skills. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 101

CHJA 111: Beginning Japanese I

An introduction to beginning Japanese. Emphasis on the acquisition of basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with discussions to practice pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.

CHJA 112: Beginning Japanese II

A continuation of CHJA 111 with further practice in basic language skills. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 111 or equivalent

CHJA 191: Directed Study in Chinese or Japanese

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHJA 195: Internship in Chinese or Japanese

An opportunity for students to apply their Chinese or Japanese language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international levels. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Study abroad at the third-year level or CHJA 401 and 402 or CHJA 411; Counter Registration Required

CHJA 201: Beginning Intermediate Chinese

A course to help students attain minimal proficiency in conversational Chinese and begin to read and write beyond the elementary level. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 102

CHJA 202: Intermediate Chinese I

Intermediate-level Chinese with further practice in conversational fluency and exposure to more difficult levels of reading and writing. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 201

CHJA 203: Intermediate Chinese II

Continued intermediate-level work in Chinese. Focus on developing more sustained use of Mandarin Chinese in conversation, reading, and writing. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 202

CHJA 204: Topics in Chinese for Special Purposes

Rotating topics course, with two alternating topics: (1) Material Culture and (2) The Environment, designed to supplement the intermediate Chinese course if taken concurrently, and to prepare students for internships and field experiences in China. Repeatable when topic is different.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: CHJA 201 and consent of instructor

CHJA 211: Beginning Intermediate Japanese

A course to help students attain minimal proficiency in conversational Japanese and begin to read and write beyond the elementary level. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 112

CHJA 212: Intermediate Japanese I

Intermediate-level Japanese with further practice in conversational fluency and exposure to more difficult levels of reading and writing. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 211 or consent of instructor

CHJA 213: Intermediate Japanese II

Intermediate-level Japanese with further practice in all four skills. A continuation of CHJA 212. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 212 or consent of instructor

CHJA 255: Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture

A survey of the Chinese language family, its linguistic structure, dialectal variations, writing system, speech registers, interaction with other languages and the internet world, and its role in reflecting cultural and societal aspects such as social class, familial hierarchy, age and gender, and Confucianism. Taught in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 255
Prerequisite: CHJA 101 or consent of instructor

CHJA 265: Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture

A survey introducing major characteristics of Japanese language with reference to the structure of Japanese society. Topics include honorifics, use of pronouns, loan words, age and gender differences in the language. The course will also familiarize students with various aspects of traditional and contemporary Japanese culture.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 265, Linguistics 265
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; CHJA 112 recommended

CHJA 301: Advanced Intermediate Chinese

An advanced Chinese course for students who want to develop their language skills. Extensive use of contemporary print and media materials to emphasize written as well as oral proficiency while providing students with a basic cultural understanding of today’s China. Course does not count toward the humanities general education requirement for B.A. and B.A./B.Mus students.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 203 or consent of instructor

CHJA 310: Introduction to East Asian Linguistics

Survey of genetic, regional, and typological classification of East Asian languages; writing systems for Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Tibetan languages; descriptive and comparative analyses of phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of East Asian languages. More than one language may be investigated in detail.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 310, Linguistics 310
Prerequisite: LING 150 and sophomore standing

CHJA 311: Advanced Intermediate Japanese

This advanced course is designed for students who wish to develop their language skills in Japanese beyond the intermediate level. It provides students with a basic cultural understanding of today’s Japan. Contemporary print and media materials will be used to enhance written as well as oral proficiency. Course does not count towards the humanities general education requirement for B.A. and B.A./B.Mus students.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 213 or consent of instructor

CHJA 332: Survey of Modern Japanese Literature and Film (in English)

This course introduces students to seminal works of Japanese literature and film from 1868 to the present, as a way to think about the transformation of Japan from a traditional society to a modern nation state.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 332

CHJA 350: Modern Chinese Literature and Cinema in Translation

A survey of 20th-century Chinese fiction and cinema. Iconoclastic works of modern Chinese vernacular fiction from 1919 through the post-Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) will be juxtaposed alongside films dealing with the same period, such as Red Sorghum (1987) and Farewell, My Concubine (1992) made by the so-called Fifth Generation of film directors (born after 1949, when the People’s Republic was founded). Class conducted in English. No knowledge of Chinese required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 350, Film Studies 350
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; EAST 150 recommended

CHJA 355: History of the Chinese Language (in English)

This course covers the history of the Chinese language, including the structural characteristics of the language, invention and evolution of the writing system, general survey of the major dialects, dichronic changes, spread and influence of the Chinese lexicon in East Asia, birth of the common language putonghua, evaluation of traditional versus simplified characters, and challenges of the language in the modern era.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 355
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; one year of Chinese recommended

CHJA 360: Chinese Contemporary Film in English

Using feature films and documentaries from the so-called Fifth [1982-] and Sixth Generations [beginning in the 1990s] of film directors in China, this course provides a visual record of the immense political, economic, and social changes in China since the Reform and Opening up period at the end of the Cultural Revolution. Taught in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 360, East Asian Studies 360
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; EAST 150 or EAST 420 recommended

CHJA 365: History of the Japanese Language (in English)

This course explores the history of the Japanese language, including theories of its origin, the importation of the Chinese characters, Kanji, the invention of the Japanese syllabaries, Kana, the development of the writing system, lexical influence of loan words, and the evolution of both written and spoken forms in modern Japanese. The course also investigates two other lanuages in Japan, the Ainu and the Ryukyu languages.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 377
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; one year of Japanese recommended

CHJA 370: Chinese Traditional Literature and Thought (in English)

An introduction to the texts and schools comprising traditional Chinese literature and thought. Reading across time and genre, from ancient classics such as Shijing to Tang poetry, to later Ming novels Water Margin and Romance of the Three Kingdoms, students will explore the breadth of the Chinese literary tradition while engaging with primary texts from the Confucian, Buddhist and Daoist traditions that shaped it. Lecture, discussion and exams.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 370

CHJA 390: Tutorial Studies in Chinese or Japanese

Individualized advanced study under regular staff direction on topics not covered in lower-level courses.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

CHJA 391: Directed Study in Chinese or Japanese

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHJA 395: Internship in Chinese or Japanese

An opportunity for students to apply their Chinese or Japanese language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international levels. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Study abroad at the third-year level or CHJA 401 and 402 or CHJA 411; Counter Registration Required

CHJA 399: Independent Study in Chinese or Japanese

Individualized advanced research under staff guidance to prepare a substantial paper, usually for submission for honors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

CHJA 401: Advanced Communicative Chinese

An advanced course, taught in Chinese, designed to strengthen the language proficiency of upper-level students, especially those returning from studying abroad in the Associated Colleges in China program. Students gain intensive practice in all communicative skills through extensive oral discussion, preparation of written reports on various social topics, and exposure to current academic essays, short stories, and films. Course does not count towards the humanities general education requirement for B.A. and B.A./B.Mus students.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 301 or consent of instructor

CHJA 402: Advanced Readings in Chinese

An advanced course in Chinese that introduces students to texts in classical and documentary style. During the first half of the course, students review the basic grammar and vocabulary of classical Chinese through short readings in traditional classical texts. The second half builds upon this base to introduce students to contemporary readings in literature and documents, which draw heavily upon classical elements. Course does not count towards the humanities general education requirement for B.A. and B.A./B.Mus students.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 301 or consent of instructor

CHJA 411: Advanced Communicative Japanese

An advanced course, taught in Japanese, designed to strengthen the language proficiency of upper-level students, especially those returning from studying in Japan. Course does not count towards the humanities general education requirement for B.A. and B.A./B.Mus students.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CHJA 311 or consent of instructor

CHJA 590: Tutorial Studies in Chinese or Japanese

Individualized advanced study under regular staff direction on topics not covered in lower-level courses.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

CHJA 591: Directed Study in Chinese or Japanese

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHJA 595: Internship in Chinese or Japanese

An opportunity for students to apply their Chinese or Japanese language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international levels. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Study abroad at the third-year level or CHJA 401 and 402 or CHJA 411; Counter Registration Required

CHJA 599: Independent Study in Chinese or Japanese

Individualized advanced research under staff guidance to prepare a substantial paper, usually for submission for honors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

CHJA 690: Tutorial Studies in Chinese or Japanese

Individualized advanced study under regular staff direction on topics not covered in lower-level courses.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

CHJA 691: Directed Study in Chinese or Japanese

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CHJA 695: Internship in Chinese or Japanese

An opportunity for students to apply their Chinese or Japanese language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international levels. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Study abroad at the third-year level or CHJA 401 and 402 or CHJA 411; Counter Registration Required

CHJA 699: Independent Study in Chinese or Japanese

Individualized advanced research under staff guidance to prepare a substantial paper, usually for submission for honors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

Classics

Associate professors:R. McNeill (Ottilia Buerger Professor of Classical Studies, chair terms II and III) (on leave term(s) I), M. Smith (Religious Studies)
Assistant professor:A. Brook (chair term I)

Classics is a quintessentially interdisciplinary field of intellectual inquiry and academic endeavor. The program of the classics department emphasizes both ancient history and the careful reading and critical study of selected Greek and Latin texts, together with formal study of the languages themselves, as a basis for further study of classical literature, art, history, linguistics, mythology, culture, and civilization.

The classics department accordingly offers three related but distinct concentrations. The traditional concentration in classical languages and literatures produces potential scholars well trained in classical philology and Greek and Latin literature, and also prepares students for teaching certification in Latin. The concentration in classical civilization combines a modicum of Greek or Latin with the study of classical culture, ancient history, and Greek and Roman art for students who wish to engage with the classical world as broadly as possible. The concentration in classical linguistics is designed for students of a more scientific bent who wish to acquire a working knowledge of Greek and Latin at the same time as they undertake the formal, rigorous study of language science.

Required for the classics major

Students may elect to fulfill the requirements of their classics major by concentrating in classical languages and literatures (I), classical civilization (II), or classical linguistics (III), depending on their intellectual interests and postgraduate plans.

  1. Classical Languages and Literatures
    CLAS 110 and 225 or their equivalents, plus 42 units from advanced courses, tutorials, or independent studies in Greek and/or Latin. Students who anticipate doing graduate work in classics should choose this concentration.
  2. Classical Civilization
    1. CLAS 110 or 225, or its equivalent
    2. Two courses from each of the following three sets of courses:
      1. CLAS 150, 160, 280, 300, 310, 510
      2. CLAS 250, 260, 275, 315, PHIL 200
      3. CLAS 340, 345, 350, 365, 368, 540
    3. 18 additional units selected from courses listed in section 2 and/or from other courses or tutorials in classics.
  3. Classical Linguistics
    CLAS 110 and 225 or their equivalents, and LING 150, plus 18 units from advanced courses or tutorials in classical languages and literatures and 18 additional units from courses or tutorials in linguistics (LING 330, 340, and 380 are especially recommended).

Required for the Greek and Latin minors

  1. Greek: 30 units from language and literature courses plus a six-unit tutorial in the history of Greek literature
    Latin: 30 units from language and literature courses plus a six- unit tutorial in the history of Latin literature
  2. C average in the minor

International Study

The curriculum at the “Centro” in Rome is considered to be virtually an integral part of the classics department’s program (see Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome). The classics programs at the American University of Rome (ISA Rome) and the College Year in Athens are also affiliated and approved options for study abroad in classics. Consult the department chair for more details.

Foreign language requirement

Students may fulfill the university’s foreign language requirement in Latin by taking CLAS 230: Introduction to Latin Literature or any 400-level Latin literature course (prerequisites: CLAS110 or 230, Intermediate Latin and Introduction to Latin Literature respectively), or in Greek by taking CLAS 225: Intermediate Greek Reading (prerequisite: CLAS 125: Intensive Elementary Greek) or any 400-level Greek literature course.

Humanities requirement

Students may fulfill the university’s humanities requirement by taking any classics course taught in English, CLAS 230, or any 400-level course in Greek or Latin literature.

Senior Experience in Classics

The Senior Experience in the Department of Classics may be fulfilled in a variety of ways, in consultation with the department chair and the student's advisor. Scholarly, pedagogical, creative, and experiential projects are all viable options. Possible experiences include: writing and defending a senior thesis; delivering a scholarly paper at a conference or as part of Classics Week; staging a production of a Greek or Roman play; developing a complete syllabus and teaching a sample class for a course in Latin or Greek at the secondary level; or working at relevant archaeological sites in Europe and the Mediterranean Sea region. For Senior Experiences that take place off-campus, a formal oral presentation will also be required.
Students pursuing double majors, double degrees, and education certification, are strongly encouraged to consult with their advisors and department chairs to plan and negotiate their overall senior experience as early as possible, especially if they are interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary capstone that integrates their interests in both majors, or combines their student teaching with a project in their major.

Courses - Classics

CLAS 101: Introduction to Classics

An introduction to Greek and Roman civilization. Through lecture and discussion students will engage with ancient textual sources (in translation) on such topics as ancient politics, philosophy, military history, poetry, theatre, social history, oratory, and art history. Students will learn about the variety of methodologies and sources of evidence used by Classicists to understand the ancient world.
Units: 6.

CLAS 120: Intensive Beginning Latin

An accelerated introductory course emphasizing the forms and basic syntax of Latin. Taken together, CLAS 120 and 220 provide students with the ability to read both classical and medieval Latin prose and poetry.
Units: 6.

CLAS 125: Intensive Beginning Greek

An accelerated introductory course emphasizing the basic systematic structure of Greek. Taken together, CLAS 125 and 225 provide students with the ability to read both classical and Koine Greek.
Units: 6.

CLAS 150: Survey of Greek History

A study of ancient Greek history from the Bronze Age to 146 B.C.E. Emphasis on the rise and fall of the Greek city-state as a political, societal, and cultural model. Readings include the historians Herodotus and Thucydides. All texts in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 180

CLAS 160: Survey of Roman History

A study of the history of Rome from its origins through the Republic and Empire to the reign of Constantine. Emphasis on political and cultural developments and the acquisition and maintenance of empire. Readings may include Livy, Tacitus, Suetonius, and the Historia Augusta. All texts in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 185

CLAS 191: Directed Study in Classics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CLAS 220: Intensive Intermediate Latin

A continuation of CLAS 120 with an emphasis on developing experience with reading connected passages of literary discourse, including selections from classical Latin prose and poetry. Successful completion fulfills the language general education requirement for the B.A.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 120 or two years of high school Latin

CLAS 225: Intensive Intermediate Greek

A continuation of CLAS 125 with emphasis on developing experience with reading connected passages of literary discourse, including sections from a variety of texts and authors. Successful completion fulfills the language general education requirement for the B.A.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 125 or its equivalent

CLAS 250: Classical Mythology

A study of classical mythology through examination of the literary mythical narratives of Greece and Rome. We will consider the form, content, and themes of these stories in order to explore the cultural significance of myth and the various ways in which myths can be interpreted. All texts in English.
Units: 6.

CLAS 260: Ancient Voices: Classical Literature in Translation

A study of specific texts selected from the corpus of Greek and Latin prose and poetry, read in English translation. Each iteration of the course will focus on a particular genre or theme in classical literature. Possible topics include: the ancient novel, death and the underworld, and Greek and Roman love poetry.
Units: 6.

CLAS 280: Warfare in Classical Antiquity

A study of the practice of warfare in classical antiquity from Homeric Greece to the Roman Empire. Topics to be considered include: Homer's Iliad and the warrior ideal, the political implications of hoplite and trireme warfare, the Persian Wars, the Peloponnesian War, the campaigns of Alexander, Hannibal, and Caesar, the organization and tactics of the Roman legion, and Roman frontier policy. Emphasis on the close interaction of military, political, and cultural developments in Greek and Roman history. All texts in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 241

CLAS 300: Periclean Athens

A study of the history of Athens from the end of the Persian Wars to the execution of Socrates (479 to 399 B.C.E.). A wide range of material and topics will be considered: social and political developments, warfare, empire, diplomacy, intellectual and cultural life. Emphasis on the revolution in ideas and visions of humanity that defined the golden age of classical Greece. All texts in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 235
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

CLAS 301: Topics in Latin Literature

Close reading and study of texts selected from the corpus of Latin literature. The course will focus on a different genre, author, or theme in Latin poetry or prose each year it is offered. Possible topics include Roman satire, Roman comedy and tragedy, love elegy, and epistolary writing. Meets concurrently with CLAS 401. Not open to students who have received credit for the current topic under CLAS 401 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 401. May be repeated when the topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 220 or three years of high school Latin

CLAS 302: Ovid

Close reading and study of Ovid’s poetry in Latin, as represented by a book of the Metamorphoses or selections from the Amores and Ars Amatoria. Discussion will be supplemented with additional primary readings in English translation and secondary scholarship. Meets concurrently with CLAS 402. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 402 or CLAS 410, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 402.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 220 or three years of high school Latin.

CLAS 303: Catullus and Horace

Careful reading and concentrated study of selected poems by Catullus and Horace in Latin. Discussion will be supplemented with additional readings in English translation and secondary scholarship. Meets concurrently with CLAS 403. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 403 or CLAS 425, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 403.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 220 or three years of high school Latin

CLAS 304: Virgil

Close reading of extended selections from Virgil in Latin, primarily drawn from the Aeneid, supplemented with additional readings in English translation and secondary scholarship. Emphasis on Virgil’s poetic technique as well as the political and cultural significance of his poetry. Meets concurrently with CLAS 404. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 404 or CLAS 440, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 404.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 220 or three years of high school Latin

CLAS 305: The Fall of the Roman Republic

A study of the final decades of the Roman Republic from the sixth consulship of Marius to the assassination of Caesar (100 to 44 B.C.E.), focusing on political, social, and cultural changes during this tumultuous period. Topics include: Roman politics, social class and identity, and Republican art, literature, and thought. All texts in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 242
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

CLAS 306: The Roman Novel

Close reading and study of selected passages in Latin from the Satyricon of Petronius and the Metamorphoses (also known as The Golden Ass) of Apuleius, the two surviving examples of the ancient Roman novel. Meets concurrently with CLAS 406. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 406 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 406.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 220 or three years of high school Latin

CLAS 307: Cicero

Close reading of a selection from the works of Cicero in Latin, supplemented with additional readings in English translation and secondary scholarship. Texts may include the Pro Caelio, the Pro Archia, and the Catilinarian Orations. Meets concurrently with CLAS 407. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 407 or CLAS 435, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 407.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CLAS 220 or three years of high school Latin

CLAS 308: Roman Historians

A study of selections from several Roman historians in Latin, chosen to emphasize specific historical events and persons depicted on Roman coins from the university’s Ottilia Buerger Collection. Meets concurrently with CLAS 408. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 408 or CLAS 415, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 408.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 220 or three years of high school Latin

CLAS 310: Augustan Rome

An introduction to ancient Rome and Roman civilization, focusing on the Age of Augustus in all its aspects: art, literature, politics, empire, law, entertainment, and society. Emphasis on the political and cultural changes that took place during this revolutionary period. All texts in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 240
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

CLAS 315: Greek-Islamic Philosophical Tradition

After covering relevant fundamentals in Greek philosophy (Aristotle and Plato), we will proceed to later philosophers, both Greek (the Neoplatonists) and Islamic (Ibn Sina, Suhrawardi), whose work inherits the same methods and questions, Our special focus will be questions about philosophical method, the soul, and mystical experience.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 316
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

CLAS 321: Topics in Greek Literature

In this course we will read excerpts from one or more authors in ancient Greek. Our discussion will be supplemented with additional primary readings in English translation and secondary scholarship. Possible topics include: the ancient novel, Greek lyric poetry, and the Homeric hymns. Meets concurrently with CLAS 421. Not open to students who have received credit for the current topic under CLAS 421 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 421. May be repeated when the topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 225 or three years of high school Greek

CLAS 322: Homer

In this course we will read excerpts from the Iliad and/or the Odyssey in Greek. Our discussion will be supplemented with additional readings in English translation and secondary scholarship. Meets concurrently with CLAS 422. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 455 or CLAS 422, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 422.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 225 or three years of high school Greek.

CLAS 323: Greek Tragedy

In this course we will read excerpts from one tragedian (e.g. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides) in ancient Greek. Our discussion will be supplemented with additional tragic material in English translation and secondary scholarship. Meets concurrently with CLAS 423. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 423 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 423.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 225 or three years of high school Greek

CLAS 324: Greek Comedy

In this course we will read excerpts from one comedian (e.g. Aristophanes, Menander) in ancient Greek. Our discussion will be supplemented with additional comic material in English translation and secondary scholarship. Meets concurrently with CLAS 424. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 424 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 424.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 225 or three years of high school Greek

CLAS 326: Plato

In this course we will read one Platonic dialogue (e.g., Symposium, Apology) in Greek. Our discussion will be supplemented with additional Platonic material in English translation and secondary scholarship. Meets concurrently with CLAS 426. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 460 or CLAS 426, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 326.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 225 or three years of high school Greek

CLAS 327: The Attic Orators

In this course we will read excerpts from one of the fourth-century Athenian orators (e.g., Lysias, Aeschines, Demosthenes) in Greek. Our discussion will be supplemented with additional material in English translation and secondary scholarship. Meets concurrently with CLAS 427. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 485 or CLAS 427, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 427.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 225 or three years of high school Greek

CLAS 328: Greek Historians

In this course we will read excerpts from one of the Greek historians (e.g., Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon) in Greek. Our discussion will be supplemented with additional primary readings in English translation and secondary scholarship. Meets concurrently with CLAS 428. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 480 or CLAS 428, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 428.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 225 or three years of high school Greek

CLAS 340: Archaic and Classical Greek Art

A study of Greek art and architecture to the end of the fourth century B.C. Topics include the great sanctuaries at Olympia, Delphi, and Athens; the development of mythological narrative in sculpture and vase painting; the political and propagandistic function of Greek art; and the beginning of portraiture.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 200
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or sophomore standing

CLAS 345: From Alexander to Kleopatra: Art of the Hellenistic Age

A study of Greek and Greek-influenced art from the time of Alexander the Great to the Roman conquest of Egypt in 31 B.C. Topics include portraiture and the royal iconography of the Hellenistic rulers, the development of regional styles in sculpture, and the influence of the Romans as patrons.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 202
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or sophomore standing

CLAS 350: Roman Art

A study of the art and architecture of the Etruscans and the Romans to the end of the Roman empire. Topics include the funerary arts of the Etruscans, the art and archaeology of Pompeii and Herculaneum, developments in imperial portraiture and historical relief, technological innovations in architecture, and the beginnings of Christian art.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 204
Prerequisite: ARHI 100 or sophomore standing

CLAS 363: Laughter and Pain: Greek and Roman Drama in Translation

In this course we analyze ancient plays both as great works of literature and as artifacts of a particular artistic, cultural, and political context. Students will read excerpts and complete plays in English from a variety of ancient authors, including (from Classical Athens) Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander, and (from late Republican and early Imperial Rome) Plautus, Terence, and Seneca.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 363, English 263
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

CLAS 365: Archaeology of the Prehistoric Aegean

A study of archaeological investigations in the Aegean region — Greece, Crete, the Cycladic Islands, and western Turkey. Emphasis on the evidence of cultural development from Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers and herders through the development of the Bronze Age “palace” civilizations of the Minoans and Mycenaeans.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 324
Prerequisite: ANTH 120 or consent of instructor

CLAS 368: Ethics in Archaeology: Who owns the past?

An exploration of ethical and legal concerns surrounding archaeology: the ownership and treatment of archaeological remains and relations between archaeologists and descendent communities. Topics include the ethics and legality of collecting looting, and the antiquities market; archaeology and nationalism; repatriation of skeletons and artifacts; and professional responsibilities of archaeologists.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 328, Art History 325
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ANTH 120, an ARHI course (preferably ancient to Renaissance), or consent of instructor

CLAS 370: War and Humanity: Greek and Roman Epic in Translation

An examination of ancient epic literature through the study of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid, all read in English translation. Emphasis on the important features and themes of the epic genre, ancient conceptions of the hero, and the literary, cultural, and political resonance of these texts in classical antiquity.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 265
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

CLAS 390: Tutorial Studies in Classics

Study of topics in Greek and Latin literature, ancient history, ancient philosophy, classical civilization, and/or linguistics, arranged and carried out in cooperation with an instructor.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CLAS 391: Directed Study in Classics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CLAS 399: Independent Study in Classics

Independent research on topics in Greek and Latin literature, ancient history, ancient philosophy, classical civilization, and/or linguistics, arranged in consultation with the department.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CLAS 401: Topics in Latin Literature

Close reading and study of texts selected from the corpus of Latin literature. Meets concurrently with CLAS 301. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be held to a higher standard of reading, translation, and performance in class and on exams, and will be assigned an additional research paper. Not open to students who have received credit for the current topic under CLAS 301 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 301. May be repeated when the topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Latin or four years of high school Latin

CLAS 402: Ovid

A study of Ovid’s poetry, as represented by selections from the Metamorphoses or the Amores and Ars Amatoria (in Latin). Meets concurrently with CLAS 302. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be held to a higher standard of reading, translation, and performance in class and on exams, and will be assigned an additional research paper. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 302 or CLAS 410, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 302.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Latin or four years of high school Latin

CLAS 403: Catullus and Horace

Careful reading and concentrated study of selected poems by Catullus and Horace (in Latin). Meets concurrently with CLAS 403. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be held to a higher standard of reading, translation, and performance in class and on exams, and will be assigned an additional research paper. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 303 or CLAS 425, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 303.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Latin or four years of high school Latin

CLAS 404: Virgil

Close reading and study of extended selections from Virgil (in Latin), primarily drawn from the Aeneid. Meets concurrently with CLAS 304. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be held to a higher standard of reading, translation, and performance in class and on exams, and will be assigned an additional research paper. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 304 or CLAS 440, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 304.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Latin or four years of high school Latin

CLAS 406: The Roman Novel

Close reading and study of selected passages in Latin from the Satyricon of Petronius and the Metamorphoses of Apuleius. Meets concurrently with CLAS 306. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be held to a higher standard of reading, translation, and performance in class and on exams, and will be assigned an additional research paper. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 306 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 306.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Latin or four years of high school Latin

CLAS 407: Cicero

Close reading and study of a selection from the works of Cicero (in Latin). Meets concurrently with CLAS 307. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be held to a higher standard of reading, translation, and performance in class and on exams, and will be assigned an additional research paper. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 307 or CLAS 435, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 307.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Latin or four years of high school Latin

CLAS 408: Roman Historians

A study of selections from several Roman historians (in Latin). Meets concurrently with CLAS 308. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be held to a higher standard of reading, translation, and performance in class and on exams, and will be assigned an additional research paper. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 308 or CLAS 415, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 308.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Latin or four years of high school Latin.

CLAS 421: Topics in Greek Literature

Close reading and study of excerpts from one or more authors in ancient Greek. Meets concurrently with CLAS 321. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be assigned a research paper and will be held to a higher standard in the assessment of their contributions to class translation and discussion and their performance on exams. Not open to students who have received credit for the current topic under CLAS 321 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 321. May be repeated when the topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Greek or four years of high school Greek.

CLAS 422: Homer

Close reading and study of excerpts from the Iliad and/or the Odyssey in Greek. Meets concurrently with CLAS 322. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be assigned a research paper and will be held to a higher standard in the assessment of their contributions to class translation and discussion and their performance on exams. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 455 or CLAS 322, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 322.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Greek or four years of high school Greek.

CLAS 423: Greek Tragedy

In this course we will read excerpts from one tragedian in ancient Greek. Meets concurrently with CLAS 323. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be assigned a research paper and will be held to a higher standard in the assessment of their contributions to class translation and discussion and their performance on exams. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 323 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 323.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Greek or four years of high school Greek

CLAS 424: Greek Comedy

In this course we will read excerpts from one comedian in ancient Greek. Meets concurrently with CLAS 324. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be assigned a research paper and will be held to a higher standard in the assessment of their contributions to class translation and discussion and their performance on exams. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 324 or who need to receive credit for CLAS 324.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Greek or four years of high school Greek

CLAS 426: Plato

Close reading and study of one Platonic dialogue (e.g., Symposium, Apology) in Greek. Meets concurrently with CLAS 326. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be assigned a research paper and will be held to a higher standard in the assessment of their contributions to class translation and discussion and their performance on exams. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 460 or CLAS 326, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 326.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Greek or four years of high school Greek.

CLAS 427: The Attic Orators

In this course we will read excerpts from one of the fourth-century Athenian orators (e.g., Lysias, Aeschines, Demosthenes) in Greek. Meets concurrently with CLAS 327. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be assigned a research paper and will be held to a higher standard in the assessment of their contributions to class translation and discussion and their performance on exams. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 485 or CLAS 327, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 327.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Greek or four years of high school Greek

CLAS 428: Greek Historians

Close reading and study of one of the Greek historians (e.g., Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon). Meets concurrently with CLAS 328. Students taking this course at the 400-level will be assigned a research paper and will be held to a higher standard in the assessment of their contributions to class translation and discussion and their performance on exams. Not open to students who have received credit for CLAS 480 or CLAS 328, or who need to receive credit for CLAS 328.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course in Greek or four years of high school Greek

CLAS 540: Topics in Ancient Art

An examination of a particular topic in ancient art history. Students are expected to carry out independent research. The topic will change periodically. Course may be repeated when the topic is different.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 400
Prerequisite: One 200- or 300-level course in art history, one course in classics, or consent of the instructor.

CLAS 545: Advanced Topics in Classics

This course examines specific issues in classical scholarship, ranging from longstanding questions of analysis and interpretation to contemporary topics of research and debate. Students will develop their familiarity with the methods of classical scholarship as they undertake independent work culminating in a research paper or book reveiw. Recommended for majors and students considering graduate study in classics.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CLAS 220 and 225 or consent of instructor.

CLAS 590: Tutorial Studies in Classics

Advanced study of topics in Greek and Latin literature, ancient history, ancient philosophy, classical civilization, and/or linguistics, arranged and carried out in cooperation with an instructor.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CLAS 591: Directed Study in Classics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CLAS 599: Independent Study in Classics

Advanced independent research on topics in Greek and Latin literature, ancient history, ancient philosophy, classical civilization, and/or linguistics, arranged in consultation with the department.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CLAS 690: Tutorial Studies in Classics

Advanced study of topics in Greek and Latin literature, ancient history, ancient philosophy, classical civilization, and/or linguistics, arranged and carried out in cooperation with an instructor.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CLAS 691: Directed Study in Classics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CLAS 699: Independent Study in Classics

Advanced independent research on topics in Greek and Latin literature, ancient history, ancient philosophy, classical civilization, and/or linguistics, arranged in consultation with the department.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Cognitive Science

Professors:T. Gottfried (Psychology), K. Krebsbach (Mathematics), T. Ryckman (Philosophy), B. Williams (Education, chair)
Associate professor:M. Phelan (Philosophy)

Cognitive science is an area of interdisciplinary study that investigates the nature and representation of knowledge, the structure and function of intelligence (natural and artificial), and the relation of mind to brain and machine. In studying cognitive science, students are encouraged to acquaint themselves with insights and methods from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, computer science, linguistics, philosophy, anthropology, and neuroscience.

The interdisciplinary minor in cognitive science is particularly relevant for students interested in experimental psychology, computer science, linguistics, or philosophy. Students interested in other disciplines, such as anthropology, economics, political science, neuroscience, or music theory, may also find cognitive science an important perspective from which to consider their work.

Requirements for the minor in cognitive science

  1. The following course:
    PHIL 105: Introduction to Cognitive Science
  2. Six additional courses, five of which must be in departments other than the student's major.
    Courses must be from at least three of the following groups:
    1. Philosophical foundations
      • PHIL 150: Symbolic Logic
      • PHIL 300: Epistemology
      • PHIL 305: Experimental Philosophy
      • PHIL 410: Philosophy of Mind
      • PHIL 420/LING 420: Topics in Logic
    2. Computation
      • CMSC 100: Exploring Computer Science
      • CMSC 470: Artificial Intelligence (prereq: CMSC 270)
      • CMSC 515: Theory of Computation (prereq: MATH 300 and CMSC 150)
    3. Neuroscience
      • PSYC 360: Brain and Behavior I
      • PSYC 530: Brain and Behavior II
      • BIOL 340/PSYC 580: Topics in Neuroscience
    4. Cognitive Processes
      • ECON 225: Decision Theory (prereq: ECON 100 or 120)
      • ECON 410: Advanced Game Theory and Applications (prereq: ECON 300)
      • EDST 180/PSYC 180: Psychology of Learning
      • EDST 345/ANTH 345/PSYC 345: Distributed Cognition
      • PSYC 260/265: Developmental Psychology
      • PSYC 340: Cognitive Psychology
      • PSYC 370: Perception
    5. Language
      • ANTH 330/LING 330: Language and Culture
      • ANTH 531/LING 531: Semiotics
      • LING 150: Introduction to Linguistics
      • LING 335: Words, Words, Words: Introduction to Lexical Semantics
      • LING 340: Introduction to Syntax
      • LING 350: Introduction to Phonology
      • LING 355: Child Language Acquisition
      • LING 370/PSYC 375: Phonetics
      • LING 450: Topics in the Psychology of Language
      • LING 470: Cognitive Linguistics
      • LING 545/EDST 545/PSYC 545: Gesture Studies
      • PHIL 400/LING 400: Philosophy of Language
      • PHIL 405/LING 405: How to Do Things With Words

Courses - Cognitive Science

CMSC 105: WWII Codebreaking

An introduction to general principles of computer science alongside specific encryption algorithms developed throughout history, culminating in a fascinating analysis of the remarkable accomplishments of Alan Turing and the Allied codebreakers of World War II. Students will break classical ciphers and will also experiment with modern techniques that facilitate secure internet transactions.
Units: 6.

PHIL 105: Introduction to Cognitive Science

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of how the mind works. Topics include: the nature of perception; what human language reveals about the mind; the basis of morality and altruism; how sexual selection has shaped human psychology; and the cognitive science of religious and spiritual belief. We will discuss tools, theories, and assumptions from philosophy, psychology, computer science, linguistics, anthropology, behavioral economics, and neuroscience.
Units: 6.

LING 150: Introduction to Linguistics

Introduction to theory and methods of linguistics: universal properties of human language; phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic structures and analysis; nature and form of grammar.
Units: 6.

PHIL 150: Symbolic Logic

Formal study of the notions of validity, consistency, and equivalence in the languages of sentential logic and predicate logic, plus an introduction to semantics for these languages.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Recommended for freshmen and sophomores

EDST 180: Psychology of Learning

An investigation of how people learn. This course examines learning theories (e.g., behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, constructivist) and their implications for the educational process in schools. Other topics include learning and the brain, the nature of expertise, the design of learning environments, and approaches to instruction that promote meaningful learning. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 180

PSYC 180: Psychology of Learning

An investigation of how people learn. This course examines learning theories (e.g., behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, constructivist) and their implications for the educational process in schools. Other topics include learning and the brain, the nature of expertise, the design of learning environments, and approaches to instruction that promote meaningful learning. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Education Studies 180

CMSC 205: Data-Scientific Programming

An introduction to programming with emphasis on learning from data in order to gain useful insights. Topics focus on elementary programming concepts in the R language and the necessary tools to handle, analyze and interpret data. This course will be taught in a workshop format, and students will complete regular assignments and a final project that provide hands-on programming/analysis experiences.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One course in mathematics or computer science, or consent of instructor

CMSC 210: Introduction to Scientific Programming

An introduction to computer programming with an emphasis on numerical applications in mathematics and the sciences. Topics include elementary programming concepts in the C language, design and implementation of numerical algorithms, and an introduction to symbolic computation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One term of calculus (either MATH 140 or MATH 120), or consent of instructor

ECON 225: Decision Theory

This course will present a thorough introduction to decision theory, the study of how people should or do make decisions. Building on that foundation, game theory, the science of strategy, will be introduced, with economic applications.
Units: 6.

PSYC 260: Developmental Psychology

A study of the development of behavior and mental processes from conception through middle childhood. Topics include prenatal development, attachment, children’s language skills, social and cognitive development. A variety of theoretical perspectives are covered.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or sophomore standing

PSYC 265: Developmental Psychology (with laboratory)

Identical in content to Psychology 260, but requiring a weekly three-hour laboratory that involves systematic work with infants and children to learn assessment techniques and experimental methodologies for the study of development.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or sophomore standing

PHIL 300: Epistemology

An examination of some basic questions concerning the nature and extent of human knowledge, focusing on the topics of skepticism, justification, certainty, the a priori and the a posteriori, and analyses of knowledge.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, junior standing, or consent of instructor

PHIL 310: Metaphysics

An examination of some central philosophical questions about reality, such as: What basic kinds of things are there? Is truth always and only relative to a conceptual scheme? What is the nature of necessity and possibility? What is the nature of change over time?
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ANTH 330: Language and Culture

An introduction to the core concepts of linguistic anthropology, definitions of language, basic methods of linguistic anthropology (observation, transcription, analysis, ethnography), power and language, language discrimination, and language ideology theory. Lectures, discussions, and labs.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 330
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or LING 150

LING 330: Language and Culture

An introduction to the core concepts of linguistic anthropology, definitions of language, basic methods of linguistic anthropology (observation, transcription, analysis, ethnography), power and language, language discrimination, and language ideology theory. Lectures, discussions, and labs.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 330
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or LING 150

LING 335: Words, Words, Words: Introduction to Lexical Semantics

This course introduces fundamental concepts and research issues in the linguistic study of word meaning. Topics include: representation of word meaning; relation between lexical, truth-conditional and context-dependent meanings; semantic relations; meaning variation; semantic properties of nouns and verbs (e.g. mass-count distinction, verb classes, aspect, semantic roles); interaction between content and function words.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150

BIOL 340: Topics in Neuroscience

A study of the nervous system from the perspectives of psychology and biology. Topics vary year to year and may include glial cells, neural development, and the evolution of nervous systems and neurotransmitter systems. Lecture only. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2019: Viral Vectors in the Central Nervous System
Viral vectors are exciting tools currently used in the field of gene therapy and in basic neuroscience research to further understand neurobiological processes. Using primary research and review articles as a basis, this course will explore the history of viral vectors, advancements in their design, the therapeutic potential of vectors for CNS disorders and the adverse effects, including biological, environmental and ethical issues, associated with them. Course format includes discussions, presentations, group work and writing assignments.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 580
Prerequisite: CHEM 116, BIOL 150, and one course in psychology; or PSYC 360 and one course in biology; or consent of instructor

LING 340: Introduction to Syntax

An introduction to descriptive analysis of morphological and syntactic structures in natural languages with an emphasis on gaining insight into the nature of such structures, rather than on linguistic formalization. Topics include levels of representation, X-bar theory, case theory, thematic roles, the lexicon, grammatical function-changing rules, and head-complement relations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150 or consent of instructor

PSYC 340: Cognitive Psychology (with laboratory)

An investigation of the mental processes involved in the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Information-processing and other approaches are used to study pattern recognition, attention, memory, imagery, problem-solving, and related topics. One laboratory per week involving class demonstrations and experiments.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or sophomore standing

ANTH 345: Distributed Cognition and the Extended Mind

The new science of the mind treats cognition as a distributed process involving the brain, body, and world. This seminar explores the role of material settings and tools, bodily engagement, social interaction, and cultural processes in human reasoning, problem solving, and learning. Students will write short papers examining aspects of cognitive activity in real-world settings.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Education Studies 345, Psychology 345
Prerequisite: PHIL 105 recommended

EDST 345: Distributed Cognition and the Extended Mind

The new science of the mind treats cognition as a distributed process involving the brain, body, and world. This seminar explores the role of material settings and tools, bodily engagement, social interaction, and cultural processes in human reasoning, problem solving, and learning. Students will write short papers examining aspects of cognitive activity in real-world settings.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 345, Psychology 345
Prerequisite: PHIL 105 recommended

PSYC 345: Distributed Cognition and the Extended Mind

The new science of the mind treats cognition as a distributed process involving the brain, body, and world. This seminar explores the role of material settings and tools, bodily engagement, social interaction, and cultural processes in human reasoning, problem solving, and learning. Students will write short papers examining aspects of cognitive activity in real-world settings.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Education Studies 345, Anthropology 345
Prerequisite: PHIL 105 recommended

PHIL 347: Valuing Art: The Philosophy and Psychology of Aesthetic Appreciation

How and why do we value art? Is there an objective standard of taste or is taste relative? How does and aesthetic property--such as beauty--differ from other properties of art--such as being made of stone? What are the roles of emotion and evolution in aesthetic response? These and other questions will be considered in this discussion-oriented class. Appropriate for those interested in philosophy, art history or cognitive science.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or sophomore standing, or consent of instructor

LING 350: Introduction to Phonology

An introduction to the formal study of phonetics, phonemics, and phonological analysis and theory. Topics include stress, syllable structure, tones, metrics, phonotactics, and links between phonology and morphology/syntax; exercises on familiar and unfamiliar languages.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150 or consent of instructor

PSYC 350: Psychopharmacology and Behavior

An interdisciplinary examination of the ways in which behaviorally active drugs exert their effects, drawing on research in pharmacology, psychology, biochemistry, anatomy, and neurophysiology. Provides an understanding and appreciation of the role of behaviorally active drugs in people’s lives, today and in the past.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; at least one prior biology course recommended

LING 355: Child Language Acquisition

Every normally developing human acquires language in early childhood. This course explores how this feat is accomplished. We will examine data on children’s linguistic knowledge at difference developmental stages and what types of theories might explain these data. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze real child language data.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150, or PSYC 260 or PSYC 265

PSYC 360: Brain and Behavior I

An introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and its relationship to behavior. Topics include cellular physiology, neuroanatomy, sensory processes, motor control, and neuropharmacology. No laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; at least one biology course recommended

LING 370: Phonetics

An introduction to the science of speech sounds, focusing on descriptive and experimental studies of articulation and speech acoustics. Laboratory demonstrations of speech production, acoustical analysis, and speech synthesis are combined with lecture/demonstrations to relate phonetics research to theories of phonology and language acquisition.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 375
Prerequisite: LING 150, PSYC 340, or consent of instructor

PSYC 370: Perception

An introduction to the physiological and psychological processes by which we receive, transform, and use the information from the world acquired through our senses. Special emphasis on visual and auditory perception to allow a more in-depth study of two perceptual systems and to provide information useful to those interested in the visual arts and music.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or sophomore standing

PSYC 375: Introduction to Phonetics

An introduction to the science of speech sounds, focusing on descriptive and experimental studies of articulation and speech acoustics. Laboratory demonstrations of speech production, acoustical analysis, and speech synthesis are combined with lecture/demonstrations to relate phonetics research to theories of phonology and language acquisition.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 370
Prerequisite: LING 150, PSYC 340, or consent of instructor

LING 400: Philosophy of Language

An examination of major theories of meaning, reference, and cognitive content and an attempt to understand how language functions to relate “internal” psychological states to things in the “external” world. Contemporary philosophers are emphasized.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 400
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, junior standing, or consent of instructor; PHIL 150 recommended

PHIL 400: Philosophy of Language

An examination of major theories of meaning, reference, and cognitive content and an attempt to understand how language functions to relate “internal” psychological states to things in the “external” world. Contemporary philosophers are emphasized.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 400
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, junior standing, or consent of instructor; PHIL 150 recommended

LING 405: How to Do Things With Words

An examination of major and cutting edge topics in the philosophy of language and linguistics. Where do word meanings come from? How can one word mean different things in different contexts? How do we promise or make commitments? Why do slurs hurt and jokes amuse? What is the nature of metaphor? Where does the border between what words mean and what speakers mean with words lie? These and other questions will be considered. Appropriate for students with an interest in philosophy, linguistics, or cognitive science.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 405
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, junior standing, or consent of the instructor

PHIL 405: How to Do Things With Words

An examination of major and cutting edge topics in the philosophy of language and linguistics. Where do word meanings come from? How can one word mean different things in different contexts? How do we promise or make commitments? Why do slurs hurt and jokes amuse? What is the nature of metaphor? Where does the border between what words mean and what speakers mean with words lie? These and other questions will be considered. Appropriate for students with an interest in philosophy, linguistics, or cognitive science.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 405
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, junior standing, or consent of the instructor

ECON 410: Advanced Game Theory and Applications

This course develops game theory, the science of strategic interaction, i.e., interdependent individuals seeking to promote their self interest, with applications in economics, biology, and philosophy. The mathematical nature of game theoretic models will be reflected in a focus on problem solving. Sufficient mathematical maturity required.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 130 or MATH 140; MATH 300 recommended

PHIL 410: Philosophy of Mind

What is the relationship between the mind and the body? What is the nature of conscious experience? How do mental states represent states of the world? Is our common sense conception of mental states and processes compatible with the methods and assumptions of cognitive science? These and other questions in the philosophy of mind will be considered.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, PSYC 340, junior standing, or consent of instructor

LING 420: Topics in Logic

An investigation of topics selected from among the following: consistency and completeness theorems for both sentential and predicate logic, Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem, logical paradoxes (Russell’s Paradox, the Liar Paradox, and Newcomb’s Paradox), and modal-tense logic and its formal semantics.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 420
Prerequisite: PHIL 150 or consent of instructor

PHIL 420: Topics in Logic

An investigation of topics selected from among the following: consistency and completeness theorems for both sentential and predicate logic, Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem, logical paradoxes (Russell’s Paradox, the Liar Paradox, and Newcomb’s Paradox), and modal-tense logic and its formal semantics.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 420
Prerequisite: PHIL 150 or consent of instructor

PSYC 420: Clinical and Affective Neuroscience

This course focuses on advanced topics in neuroscience involving emotion. We will explore emerging knowledge of the brain's involvement in emotional behaviors, including physiological and psychological states. Course topics include: neural plasticity, human neuroscience methods, emotions, and pathophysiology of affective disorders.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PSYC 350 or PSYC 360

LING 450: Topics in the Psychology of Language

An examination of the nature and structure of language, integrating knowledge from linguistics, psychology, neurophysiology, and sociology. Focus on the psychological theories and experimental evidence about language production and perception.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 540
Prerequisite: PSYC 340, LING 150, or consent of instructor

CMSC 470: Artificial Intelligence

A detailed investigation into foundational concepts of artificial intelligence: search, knowledge representation, and automated planning. Specific topics include uninformed and heuristic search techniques, logic-based knowledge representations, automated theorem-proving, logic programming (Prolog), action representations, means-ends analysis, regression and partial-order planning, and reachability analysis using graphs.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 250 and CMSC 270

LING 470: Cognitive Linguistics

Cognitive linguistics is a subfield of linguistics and cognitive science that studies conceptual structure, language, and meaning in relation to general cognitive mechanisms. Topics include cognitive and construction grammars, categorization, construal, image schemas, mental spaces, conceptual metaphors, and conceptual blending.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150 or consent of instructor

CMSC 515: Theory of Computation

A study of programming in the abstract, leading to an understanding of the precise nature and limitations of computing machines. Topics include universal computing machines such as Turing machines, decidable and undecidable predicates, regular and pushdown automata, and regular and context-free grammars.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 150 and either MATH 220 or MATH 300

PSYC 525: Brain and Behavior II (no lab)

This course is identical in content to PSYC 530, but it has no laboratory. An examination of the interrelationships between the brain and behavior. Topics include sleep, language, motivation, emotions, learning, and mental disorders.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PSYC 360

ANTH 531: Semiotics

Semiotics is the study of signs, symbols, and signification in social life. This course will cover semiotic theory, including theorists such as Saussure, Peirce, Jakobson, Lévi-Strauss, Barthes, and Bakhtin, and the application of semiotics to the study of language and social life, conducted through lectures and seminar-style discussions.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 531
Prerequisite: ANTH 330/LING 330 or ANTH 331

LING 531: Semiotics

Semiotics is the study of signs, symbols, and signification in social life. This course will cover semiotic theory, including theorists such as Saussure, Peirce, Jakobson, Lévi-Strauss, Barthes, and Bakhtin, and the application of semiotics to the study of language and social life, conducted through lectures and seminar-style discussions.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 531
Prerequisite: ANTH 330/LING 330

PSYC 540: Topics in the Psychology of Language

An examination of the nature and structure of language, integrating knowledge from linguistics, psychology, neurophysiology, and sociology. Focus on the psychological theories and experimental evidence about language production and perception.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 450
Prerequisite: PSYC 340, LING 150, or consent of instructor

PSYC 580: Topics in Neuroscience

A study of the nervous system from the perspectives of psychology and biology. Topics vary year to year and may include glial cells, neural development, and the evolution of nervous systems and neurotransmitter systems. Lecture only. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2019: Viral Vectors in the Central Nervous System
Viral vectors are exciting tools currently used in the field of gene therapy and in basic neuroscience research to further understand neurobiological processes. Using primary research and review articles as a basis, this course will explore the history of viral vectors, advancements in their design, the therapeutic potential of vectors for CNS disorders and the adverse effects, including biological, environmental and ethical issues, associated with them. Course format includes discussions, presentations, group work and writing assignments.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 340
Prerequisite: CHEM 116, BIOL 150 and one course in psychology; or PSYC 360 and one course in biology; or consent of instructor

Computer Science

Professor:K. Krebsbach (Mathematics)
Associate professor:J. Gregg (Mathematics)

The mathematics department, with other members of the faculty, coordinates computer science. The interdisciplinary mathematics-computer science major offers students an opportunity to combine these two disciplines, enriching both.

Computer science combines an empirical aspect — which involves implementing specific algorithms — with a theoretical aspect — which involves analysis of abstract processes using methods of applied mathematics. Both aspects of the discipline contribute to understanding what problems are amenable to computer solution and what methods are optimal.

Today, computing importantly serves academic research no less than commercial enterprise. Moreover, a disciplined exposure to computer science within the context of studies in liberal arts and sciences fosters in the student the development of clarity and precision in analysis, logic, and expression.

Computing facilities on campus are abundant, offering students the opportunity to work with all major operating systems and programming languages.

Required for the interdisciplinary mathematics-computer science major

  1. The core sequence: MATH 140, 150, 160 and CMSC 150, 250, and 270
  2. MATH 220 and 300
  3. CMSC 460, 510, and 515
  4. 6 additional units in mathematics courses selected from among MATH 310, 420, 525, and 540
  5. 6 additional units in a computer science course numbered 400 or above
  6. 6 additional units in a computer science course numbered 400 or above or selected from among MATH 310, 420, 525, and 540
  7. Completion of an independent study project prior to the Spring Term of the senior year
  8. CMSC 600 in the senior year

Required for the computer science minor

  1. MATH 140, 150, and 160
  2. MATH 210 or 220
  3. CMSC 150 and 270
  4. 18 additional units in computer science courses numbered 250 or above, one of which must be numbered 400 or above
  5. C average in the minor

Tutorials

No tutorials are given for courses routinely offered, and the department does not normally permit a tutorial to satisfy a major or minor requirement for graduation

Placement

Advanced placement and six units of Lawrence credit (for CMSC 150) may be obtained by scoring 4 or 5 on the A or AB computer science exam administered by the College Board. Consult the department for details and proper placement.

Senior Experience in Mathematics-Computer Science

Interdisciplinary mathematics-computer science majors must complete their independent study project in two parts: an independent study in the fall or winter term of the senior year (usually 3 units), followed by a presentation of their results in the winter term Computer Science Senior Seminar (3 units).
The project must be approved and supervised by a faculty member in the mathematics department. Students should consult with departmental members in the spring before their senior year, in order to plan appropriately for their Senior Experience.

Courses - Computer Science

CMSC 105: WWII Codebreaking

An introduction to general principles of computer science alongside specific encryption algorithms developed throughout history, culminating in a fascinating analysis of the remarkable accomplishments of Alan Turing and the Allied codebreakers of World War II. Students will break classical ciphers and will also experiment with modern techniques that facilitate secure internet transactions.
Units: 6.

CMSC 106: Web Client Programming

An introduction to some of the technologies underlying the world wide web, with emphasis on client-side programming. Topics covered include introductions to HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. This course is suitable for students with no prior experience in programming.
Units: 6.

CMSC 150: Introduction to Computer Science

An introduction to computer programming for potential mathematics/computer science majors and other students with a strong interest in computing. Topics include elementary programming constructs, design and implementation of algorithms, and object-oriented programming. Introductory instruction in the Java language.
Units: 6.

CMSC 191: Directed Study in Computer Science

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CMSC 195: Internship In Computer Science

The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

CMSC 205: Data-Scientific Programming

An introduction to programming with emphasis on learning from data in order to gain useful insights. Topics focus on elementary programming concepts in the R language and the necessary tools to handle, analyze and interpret data. This course will be taught in a workshop format, and students will complete regular assignments and a final project that provide hands-on programming/analysis experiences.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One course in mathematics or computer science, or consent of instructor

CMSC 210: Introduction to Scientific Programming

An introduction to computer programming with an emphasis on numerical applications in mathematics and the sciences. Topics include elementary programming concepts in the C language, design and implementation of numerical algorithms, and an introduction to symbolic computation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One term of calculus (either MATH 140 or MATH 120), or consent of instructor

CMSC 250: Intermediate Programming Concepts

A study of more advanced programming techniques in the Java language. Topics include graphical user interfaces, exception-handling, multithreading, networking, databases, and web applications.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 150

CMSC 270: Introduction to Data Structures

A study of advanced programming and an introduction to data structures. Topics focus on programming skills needed for the design and implementation of standard data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs and their associated algorithms. Additional topics include recursion, analysis of algorithms, and advanced aspects of object-oriented programming in the C++ language.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 150 and CMSC 250, or consent of instructor

CMSC 390: Tutorial Studies in Computer Science

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CMSC 391: Directed Study in Computer Science

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CMSC 395: Internship In Computer Science

The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

CMSC 399: Independent Study in Computer Science

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CMSC 410: Systems Analysis and Design

An introduction to techniques for analyzing and modeling systems for implementation as computer programs. Topics include a survey of modeling methodologies for structured and object-oriented systems and case studies of system development. Also, applications of analysis and design methods to database design and design of distributed systems.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 250

CMSC 420: Computer Graphics

The fundamentals of computer graphics and their applications in visualizing a variety of scientific phenomena. Topics include graphics primitives, two- and three-dimensional transformations, three-dimensional viewing techniques, spline curves, surface patches, hidden line algorithms, ray tracing, radiosity, texture-mapping, and fractals.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 140 and CMSC 270

CMSC 435: Computer Organization & Architecture

The structure and function of computers as viewed from the hardware/software interface. Hardware topics include elementary digital logic, data storage devices, dataflow pathways, and central processor organization with special emphasis on parallelism. Corresponding software topics include data representation and manipulation, instruction sets, addressing techniques, and program control mechanisms.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 250 and CMSC 270

CMSC 460: Programming Languages

An examination of issues in the design and implementation of programming languages. Students will first gain proficiency in the functional programming paradigm (using Scheme), and will then design and implement, in Scheme, an interpreter for a brand-new programming language.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 250 and CMSC 270

CMSC 470: Artificial Intelligence

A detailed investigation into foundational concepts of artificial intelligence: search, knowledge representation, and automated planning. Specific topics include uninformed and heuristic search techniques, logic-based knowledge representations, automated theorem-proving, logic programming (Prolog), action representations, means-ends analysis, regression and partial-order planning, and reachability analysis using graphs.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 250 and CMSC 270

CMSC 480: Systems Programming

A survey of some fundamental aspects of computer operating systems and their impact on the performance of software. Topics include process and memory management, system level input/output, concurrency, and parallel programming.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 270

CMSC 510: Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

Advanced data structures and the time and space efficiency of the algorithms that manipulate such structures. Topics include proof of correctness for algorithms, recursion, dynamic programming, optimized tree structures, union-find problems, graphs, path-finding algorithms, and string search algorithms.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 270 and MATH 220

CMSC 515: Theory of Computation

A study of programming in the abstract, leading to an understanding of the precise nature and limitations of computing machines. Topics include universal computing machines such as Turing machines, decidable and undecidable predicates, regular and pushdown automata, and regular and context-free grammars.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: CMSC 150 and either MATH 220 or MATH 300

CMSC 590: Tutorial Studies in Computer Science

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CMSC 591: Directed Study in Computer Science

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CMSC 595: Internship In Computer Science

The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

CMSC 599: Independent Study in Computer Science

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CMSC 600: Computer Science Senior Seminar

Intended as a capstone experience for math-computer science majors, this course provides a forum for seniors to formally present the results of their required independent study projects. CMSC minors and other students doing senior projects involving computing are also invited to present their work in this seminar.
Units: 3.

CMSC 690: Tutorial Studies in Computer Science

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CMSC 691: Directed Study in Computer Science

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

CMSC 695: Internship In Computer Science

The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

CMSC 699: Independent Study in Computer Science

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

East Asian Studies

Associate professors:A. Balsekar (Government), B. Jenike (Edward F. Mielke Professor of Ethics in Medicine, Science and Society Anthropology, chair), K. Sung (Chinese and Japanese) (on leave term(s) I)
Assistant professors:C. Kassor (Religious Studies), N. Lin (Art and Art History), B. Vance (History) (on leave term(s) I)
Instructor:M. Wegehaupt (Dean of Faculty Office)

The Program in East Asian Studies is dedicated to the study of the civilizations, cultures, and contemporary importance of East Asia. The rich cultural heritages and the political and economic significance of the region are covered by courses in anthropology, history, government, literature, and religious studies. To achieve in-depth and critical understanding of East Asia, the East Asian Studies major combines the study of Chinese or Japanese language to the advanced intermediate level with breadth of coursework on East Asia taught in English. Majors typically further strengthen their Chinese or Japanese language skills by studying in China or Japan through an off-campus program. In addition to improving language skills and filling out the student’s program in regionally specific courses, studying abroad in China or Japan enhances the students’ academic program through firsthand cultural experience in East Asia.

Beginning with foundational coursework in traditional and modern East Asian history, students gain an understanding of the basic historical development of East Asian political and cultural traditions. Students then draw from this historical knowledge in their subsequent seminars to analyze in depth how these traditions have evolved with modernization, and to examine contemporary areas of social change. Through a disciplinary focus as well as coursework that situates East Asia in a global context, majors also learn how to relate the relevance of the study of China, Japan, or South Korea to a broader international or academic context.

The major in East Asian Studies thus seeks to prepare students intellectually, linguistically, and personally for further graduate work or professional careers as East Asian specialists.

Required for the major in East Asian Studies

  1. At least one language course CHJA 301/311 or higher
  2. EAST 140: Traditional East Asian Civilization
    EAST 150: Modern East Asian Civilization
  3. Three 6-unit elective courses in EAST, one of which must be a mid-level seminar or higher (300-level or higher). One elective course taken on an off-campus program may, upon approval of an EAST faculty advisor, count for one of these three courses.
  4. One course that situates East Asian culture in a broader academic or international context, such as:
    • GOVT 245: Comparative Politics of Less-Developed Countries
    • GOVT 340: International Politics
    • GOVT 480: International Organizations
    • HIST 295: Nationalism in the Modern World
    Students should consult with the EAST chair to select a course appropriate to their interests.
  5. EAST 620: Senior Seminar in East Asian Studies or, if EAST 620 is not offered, EAST 699: Independent Study in East Asian Studies (6 units), resulting in the completion of a substantial research paper or project.

Overall, at least nine 6-unit courses should be taken at the Lawrence, Appleton campus.

In addition to the requirements listed above, majors are strongly advised to have a disciplinary focus to frame their senior experience. EAST coursework in a discipline of interest such as Anthropology, History, Religious Studies, Government, Linguistics, Economics, or literature, as well as additional coursework in methods and theory in that same discipline should be completed prior to EAST 620.

Majors are also encouraged to further strengthen their Chinese or Japanese language skills by studying in China or Japan (see Off-Campus Programs) and/or in one of several intensive summer language programs offered in the U.S.

Required for the minor in East Asian Studies

  1. Five courses, as follows:
    1. EAST 140: Traditional East Asian Civilization
    2. EAST 150: Modern East Asian Civilization
    3. Three 6-unit elective courses in EAST
  2. One additional advanced course on East Asia that builds on coursework already taken
  3. An independent study in an area of interest
  4. C average in the minor

Senior Experience in East Asian Studies

EAST 620: Senior Seminar in East Asian Studies A senior level workshop culminating in the completion of a substantial paper or project derived from previous coursework in the discipline or related fields or field experience in consultation with department faculty.
Students with sufficiently advanced Chinese or Japanese language skills are encouraged to use some target language sources in carrying out their research. Students must share the results of their work in a public forum prior to graduation.

Courses - East Asian Studies

EAST 105: Cross-Cultural Interactions Along the Silk Road, 200 BCE - 1400 CE

The so-called "Silk Road" was the world's first superhighway, linking East Asia to the Mediterranean. The peoples along the way not only traded luxury goods, but also ideas, technology, and more. This course offers a thematic examination of the dynamic, cross-cultural interactions along the ancient and medieval Silk Road.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 105

EAST 140: Traditional East Asian Civilization

An introductory survey of East Asia from the dawn of indigenous civilization to the 16th century. Focus on the growth of a Sinitic center and its interaction with the sedentary and nomadic peoples on its Inner Asian and Pacific rims. Emphasis on the diverse peoples and societies of the area and the historical processes that bound them together through a common tradition.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 160, Ethnic Studies 121

EAST 150: Modern East Asian Civilization

An introductory survey of the modern history of East Asia, examining the efforts of traditional states, particularly China and Japan, to respond to Western intrusion into the region after 1600. Focus on social and cultural problems created by attempts to modernize yet defend tradition and on the differing results of Chinese and Japanese approaches.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 165

EAST 175: The Arts of East Asia

An introduction to artistic traditions in China, Japan, and Korea, from prehistory to the 21st century, including such objects as tomb and temple sites, gardens sculpture, calligraphy, painting, prints, and bronze and ceramic vessels. Through a balance of broader art historical readings, primary texts, scholarly essays, and focused exercises in viewing, students will explore how an object’s visual and material properties contribute to its function.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 175

EAST 191: Directed Study in East Asian Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EAST 216: Buddhism in China and Japan

An introductory survey of Buddhist thought and practice in China and Japan. The history of key Buddhist concepts and schools in East Asia is the primary focus. Readings include translations from East Asian Buddhist canonical works.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 216

EAST 265: Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture

A survey introducing major characteristics of Japanese language with reference to the structure of Japanese society. Topics include honorifics, use of pronouns, loan words, age and gender differences in the language. The course will also familiarize students with various aspects of traditional and contemporary Japanese culture.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 265, Linguistics 265
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; CHJA 112 recommended

EAST 283: Chinese Philosphy

A survey of topics in Chinese Philosophy, which may include Classical Chinese philosphy, Buddhism and religion and comparative philosphy. We will discuss how the quickly changing historical and political climates affect the major schools of thought and influence pertinent philosphical questions for the region or topic. Asisgnments include papers and in-class assignments/presentations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 283
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

EAST 284: The Spectacle of Edo Japan

This lecture-discussion course will focus on the diverse artistic production and consumption within Edo-period Japan (1603-1868). Topics include the revival of classical imagery, the rise of an urban bourgeois culture, the prints and paintings depicting theater and the pleasure quarters, the reification of the tea ceremony and encounters with the West through trade. Coursework will include exams and written work, and presentation.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 284
Prerequisite: ARHI 175 or sophomore standing

EAST 285: The Transformation of the East Asian Metropole: Tokyo, Seoul and Shanghai (1860-1945)

This lecture-discussion course explores the transformation of the cityscape in Tokyo, Seoul and Shanghai. Topics include the emergence of the modern artist, the search for an “avant-garde” of the East, the modernization of public and private spaces, the introduction of film and photography and the rise of the “modern girl.” Coursework will include exams, an annotated bibliography and a paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 285
Prerequisite: ARHI 175 or sophomore standing

EAST 286: The Politics and Power in Modern and Contemporary Chinese Art

Over the past century, China has witnessed the arrival of Western Imperialism, mass rebellion, revolution, and radical reconstruction under the Communist regime. This seminar will trace how artists attempted to intervene in social life to change its course of devlopment and how art continues to affect radical social change. Students will be assessed through exams, presentations, and written assignments.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 286
Prerequisite: ARHI 101 or sophomore standing

EAST 308: Half the Sky: Chinese Women's History

This course examines important questions about the lives of women in the last thousand years of Chinese history. Through an exploration of primary sources in translation, classic works of fiction, film, memoirs, and oral histories, we will address theoretical questions fundamental to both women’s studies and Chinese history.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 308
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

EAST 310: Introduction to East Asian Linguistics

Survey of genetic, regional, and typological classification of East Asian languages; writing systems for Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Tibetan languages; descriptive and comparative analyses of phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of East Asian languages. More than one language may be investigated in detail.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Linguistics 310, Chinese and Japanese 310
Prerequisite: LING 150 and sophomore standing

EAST 331: Topics in East Asian Art

An examination of a particular topic in East Asian art history. Students are expected to carry out independent reaseach through a series of guided assignments. The topic will change periodically. Course may be repeated when the topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received or need to receive credit for ARHI 430.

Topic for Spring 2019: Modern Ruins in East Asia
In examining modern catastrophes—acts of war, iconoclasm, natural and man-made disasters, this seminar will focus on how sites of modern ruination have been both documented and aestheticized. Individual case studies will include the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake, wartime reportage, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, protest imagery, the demotion of colonial architecture, and environmental art. Coursework will include written assignments and a research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 331
Prerequisite: One 200-level course in art historyor consent of instructor

EAST 332: Survey of Modern Japanese Literature and Film (in English)

This course introduces students to seminal works of Japanese literature and film from 1868 to the present, as a way to think about the transformation of Japan from a traditional society to a modern nation state.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 332

EAST 345: Theorizing the Female Body in East Asian Art

This discussion-based course will examine how tomb murals, paintings, prints, photography, and film have addressed the female body throughout East Asian history. We will explore how social and political issues were defined and negotiated through the gendered images of bodies in Japan, Korea and China in the context of national identity formation, historical reconstruction, subjectivity and sexuality. Coursework will include exams and a research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 345, Gender Studies 345
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EAST 350: Modern Chinese Literature and Cinema in Translation

A survey of 20th-century Chinese fiction and cinema. Iconoclastic works of modern Chinese vernacular fiction from 1919 through the post-Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) will be juxtaposed alongside films dealing with the same period, such as Red Sorghum (1987) and Farewell, My Concubine (1992) made by the so-called Fifth Generation of film directors (born after 1949, when the People’s Republic was founded). Class conducted in English. No knowledge of Chinese required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 350, Film Studies 350
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; EAST 150 recommended

EAST 355: History of the Chinsese Language (in English)

This course covers the history of the Chinese language, including the structural characteristics of the language, invention and evolution of the writing system, general survey of the major dialects, dichronic changes, spread and influence of the Chinese lexicon in East Asia, birth of the common language putonghua, evaluation of traditional versus simplified characters, and challenges of the language in the modern era.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 355
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; one year of Chinese recommended

EAST 360: Chinese Contemporary Film in English

Using feature films and documentaries from the so-called Fifth [1982-] and Sixth Generations [beginning in the 1990s] of film directors in China, this course provides a visual record of the immense political, economic, and social changes in China since the Reform and Opening up period at the end of the Cultural Revolution. Taught in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 360, Film Studies 360
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; EAST 150 or EAST 420 recommended

EAST 361: Western Encounters with China: Perceptions and Misperceptions

This course examines Western encounters with China since the thirteenth century, from Marco Polo to contemporary journalists, such as Peter Hessler. Students will analyze and assess Western perceptions and misperceptions of China through a variety of primary sources in translation and relevant secondary studies.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 361
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EAST 364: Ethnography of East Asia

A critical and comparative examination of key areas of sociocultural change in present-day East Asia. Focusing on China, we address new areas of research in East Asian anthropology such as demographic change, modernization, urbanization and stratification, gender and the body politic, sexuality, pop culture, consumption, ethnic minorities and national cultural identities.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 364
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

EAST 366: Ethnography of Japan

Critical examination of social and cultural (re)presentations of Japan from the postwar to the postmodern. Exploration of diversities of lived reality and social change in contemporary Japan. Topics include: nationalism and historical consciousness, family and gender ideologies, invisible and visible others, sexuality, pop culture, and the Heisei recession.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 366
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or sophomore standing

EAST 370: Chinese Traditional Literature and Thought (in English)

An introduction to the texts and schools comprising traditional Chinese literature and thought. Reading across time and genre, from ancient classics such as Shijing to Tang poetry, to later Ming novels Water Margin and Romance of the Three Kingdoms, students will explore the breadth of the Chinese literary tradition while engaging with primary texts from the Confucian, Buddhist and Daoist traditions that shaped it. Lecture, discussion and exams.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 370

EAST 377: History of the Japanese Language (in English)

This course explores the history of the Japanese language, including theories of its origin, the importation of the Chinese characters, Kanji, the invention of the Japanese syllabaries, Kana, the development of the writing system, lexical influence of loan words, and the evolution of both written and spoken forms in modern Japanese. The course also investigates two other lanuages in Japan, the Ainu and the Ryukyu languages.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 365
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; one year of Japanese recommended

EAST 378: East Asian Environmental History

This course will explore traditional East Asian ideas about the relationship between humans and their natural environments, as well the premodern and modern history of that interaction. We will also consider the relationship between these philosophies and practice, both for the societies we study and for our own.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 378
Prerequisite: Some background in East Asian Studies or Environmental Studies is recommended.

EAST 380: Asian Women and Feminism

This course will focus on the history of women and feminism in Asia, with an emphasis on Indian and East Asian women's histories. Past and present religious, political, economic, and artistic thought and practices of women will be examined to analyse how they have responded to and resisted patriarchal cultures. This course can be counted as the equivalent of GEST 280.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: GEST 100 or consent of instructor

EAST 388: Early Modern Japan

This discussion course offers an overview of the early modern history of Japan. Through an analysis of literature, woodblock prints, documents, and secondary historical studies we will explore selected issues in the social and cultural history of the Tokugawa and Meiji periods.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 388
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

EAST 390: Tutorial Studies in East Asian Studies

Individualized advanced study under regular staff direction on topics not covered in lower-level courses.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EAST 391: Directed Study in East Asian Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EAST 399: Independent Study in East Asian Studies

Individualized advanced research under staff guidance to prepare a substantial paper.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EAST 420: Contemporary China

A discussion course on selected issues in the social and cultural history of modern China. Literature, films, documents, and historical studies are examined to explore the intimate side of personal, family, and social life and the nature and impact of social and cultural changes in 20th-century China.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 360
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor; HIST 165 recommended

EAST 430: Topics in Asian Art

An examination of a particular topic in the history of art in Asia. Students are expected to carry out independent research culminating in a research paper. Course may be repeated when topic is different. Not open to students who have previously received credit for ARHI 331.

Topic for Spring 2019: Modern Ruins in East Asia
In examining modern catastrophes—acts of war, iconoclasm, natural and man-made disasters, this seminar will focus on how sites of modern ruination have been both documented and aestheticized. Individual case studies will include the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake, wartime reportage, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, protest imagery, the demotion of colonial architecture, and environmental art. Coursework will include written assignments and a research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 430
Prerequisite: One 200-level course in art history or consent of instructor

EAST 491: Borderlands in Modern East and Inner Asia: History, Culture, and Identity

Seminar on Euro-Asian borderlands, with a focus on East Asia during the Modern Period. Adopting a transnational approach, the course examines the fluidity of the concept of the “frontier,” along with various understandings of what borderlands are, from the perspective of both indigenous peoples and those from afar.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 491
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor

EAST 492: The Art of Healing: A History of Chinese Medicine

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of the history of Chinese medicine. Students will study the canonical literature of the discipline, and analyze the ways in which those texts and ideas have been reshaped in modern and contemporary practice. Topics include: forensic medicine, gender, religion, and public health.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 492
Prerequisite: Junior standing

EAST 510: Seminar on Zen Buddhism

Zen Buddhism is perhaps the most widely known form of Buddhism in the West and also the most widely misunderstood. This course provides a detailed look at the history and doctrines of Zen Buddhism in China and Japan. Combining the use of original source materials (in translation) with an emphasis on intellectual history, the course covers specific doctrines that have differentiated the major schools of Zen.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 510
Prerequisite: RLST 220 or RLST 216

EAST 590: Tutorial Studies in East Asian Studies

Individualized advanced study under regular staff direction on topics not covered in lower-level courses.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EAST 591: Directed Study in East Asian Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EAST 599: Independent Study in East Asian Studies

Individualized advanced research under staff guidance to prepare a substantial paper.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EAST 620: Senior Seminar in East Asian Studies

A senior level workshop culminating in the completion of a substantial paper or project derived from previous coursework in the discipline or related fields or field experience in consultation with department faculty. Students with sufficiently advanced Chinese or Japanese language skills are encouraged to use some target language sources in carrying out their research. Students must share the results of their work in a public forum prior to graduation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Senior majors with advanced intermediate Chinese or Japanese language or the equivalent.

EAST 690: Tutorial Studies in East Asian Studies

Individualized advanced study under regular staff direction on topics not covered in lower-level courses.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EAST 691: Directed Study in East Asian Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EAST 699: Independent Study in East Asian Studies

Individualized senior-level advanced research under staff guidance to prepare a substantial paper for the senior experience, or for submission for honors.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Economics

Professor:M. Finkler (John R. Kimberly Professor Emeritus of the American Economic System)
Associate professors:A. Galambos (Dwight and Marjorie Peterson Professor of Innovation), D. Gerard (The John R. Kimberly Distinguished Professor of the American Economic System, chair)
Assistant professors:H. Caruthers, D. Fitz, J. Lhost
Lecturer:G. Vaughan

Lawrence economics students first acquire a basic knowledge of economic theories, principles, and techniques of analysis. They then apply them to a wide range of problems, from poverty and discrimination to macroeconomic stabilization policy and environmental degradation.

Students learn early on that modern economics is an application of mathematical modeling to the study of human behavior. The interdisciplinary mathematics-economics major provides a strong foundation for graduate work in economics, where mathematical aptitude is at a premium. This route also provides outstanding preparation for technical business careers, such as investment banking, management consulting, and finance.

Required for the economics major

  1. ECON 100
  2. MATH 140 or both MATH 120 and 130; MATH 107 (or equivalent)
  3. Intermediate Theory
    1. ECON 300
    2. ECON 320
    3. ECON 380
    (Majors must take all three courses prior to completion of the junior year. The department must approve any exception.)
  4. Five additional six-unit courses numbered 200 or higher, three of which must be numbered 400-699 not including the Senior Experience requirement.
    (Only six units of tutorial or independent study credit may count as one of these five courses.)
  5. Complete the Senior Experience in Economics requirement by taking ECON 601 or ECON 602 as described below.
  6. The grade-point average for the major will be computed from economics courses and from required mathematics courses. A C average is required.

Required for the interdisciplinary mathematics-economics major

  1. The mathematics component of the major is:
    • MATH 140, 150, 160, 240, 300, and 310
    • Either MATH 435 or 445
    • 6 additional units in a mathematics course numbered 400 or above, with 435, 440, 445, or 560 recommended
  2. The economics component of the major is:
    • ECON 100
    • ECON 300, 320, and 380 (majors must take all three courses prior to completion of the junior year. The Economics department must approve any exception.)
    • Any three six-unit courses numbered between 400 and 580
  3. The interdisciplinary component of the major is:
    • Completion of an independent study project that has been approved by both departments.
    • A major must have an advisor in each department.

Required for the economics minor

  1. ECON 100 or ECON 300
  2. Six additional six-unit courses, at least five of which must be economics courses numbered 200 or above and one that could be a mathematics course.
  3. (Only six units of tutorial or independent study credit may count as one of these six courses.)
  4. C average in the minor

Recommendations

ECON 100 and ECON 225 are excellent either as stand-alone courses or as gateways into the discipline.

For the economics or mathematics-economics major:

  • Speak to a professor in the department about the selection of a coherent set of electives.
  • Take MATH 140 or 120 and 130 as soon as possible. MATH 150 and MATH 210 are also recommended.
  • Take ECON 100, a 200-level economics course, and then ECON 300.
  • If you do not meet pre-requisites for any course, talk with the instructor and explicitly obtain consent.
  • Students preparing for graduate work in economics, public policy, or business or those preparing for an M.B.A. in a quantitative field should plan to take a number of mathematics courses and should consult the economics faculty for advice. The mathematics-economics major is particularly well-suited for these students. Furthermore, students should take ECON 500 and ECON 520 as part of their preparation.
  • Students preparing for a career in secondary-school teaching should check state certification requirements.

Course structure and numbering

ECON 100 is a survey course and is an excellent introduction to the discipline, even for those with high school courses.
The 200-level courses apply basic theory to particular fields of inquiry and should be accessible to students with a sound introductory course.
The 300-level courses are intermediate theory courses geared toward economics majors, while the 400-level courses are advanced applications classes. The 500-level courses are graduate-school preparatory courses.

Senior Experience in Economics

The economics curriculum culminates with a one-term three-unit senior experience course required for all majors. Each year, two sections of the course will be offered. In one section (ECON 601), in which the students read a monograph by a formidable economist or a piece of central interest to economists and engage in active discussion, each student produces a term paper in reaction to the reading. In the paper, each student must relate the reading to theories and applications he or she studied in economics courses. The monograph will be selected by the faculty member teaching the course. This senior experience option is designed to mirror the Freshman Studies experience at the end of the student’s career at Lawrence. In the other section (ECON 602), each student is expected to produce a well-researched paper that stands up to the standards of the profession. To register for this section, students must already have a paper prepared in a 400-level course. Students must submit to the instructor a one-page proposal on how the previous paper will be improved, refined and polished in content and in form so that it stands up to the standards of the profession. The instructor’s approval of this proposal is a prerequisite for registration.
In addition to the two options described above, an entrepreneurial project may also be approved as a senior experience after early and in-depth consultation with the department chair and the student’s advisor. Students pursuing double majors, double degrees, and education certification, are strongly encouraged to consult with their advisors and relevant department chairs to plan and negotiate their overall senior experience as early as possible, especially if they are interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary capstone that integrates their interests in both majors, or combines their student teaching with a project in their major.
Interdisciplinary mathematics-economics (economics-mathematics) majors may choose to meet their senior experience requirement by taking one of the above workshop senior experience courses or by satisfying the requirement of the Department of Mathematics for interdisciplinary mathematics-economics majors’ requirement. In either case, they will need to demonstrate the ability to combine topics in both disciplines – bringing appropriate techniques of mathematics or statistics to bear on the study of economics, or learning mathematics or statistics suggested by models in economics. Students who plan to complete this interdisciplinary major must have their senior experience proposal approved by one advisor in the Department of Mathematics and one in the Department of Economics prior to the term in which they plan to complete the experience.

Courses - Economics

ECON 100: Introductory Economics

A first course in economics focusing on the basic analytical framework used by contemporary economists. The central topics typically include supply and demand, market competition, market power, incomplete markets (e.g., externalities and public goods), trade, and taxation. Classroom experiments are frequently employed to develop economic intuition.
Units: 6.

ECON 120: Introductory Macroeconomics

A study of the principles, concepts, and methods of economic analysis, with a theoretical focus on the determination of national income. Special attention given to governmental expenditure and taxation, monetary policy, inflation, and unemployment.
Units: 6.

ECON 151: Introduction to Environmental Policy

This course applies principles of economics and political science to environmental issues, including pollution, resource limitation, and environmental degradation. It is designed to foster an understanding of the environmental policy-making and regulatory process in the United States and globally.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 151, Government 151

ECON 170: Financial Accounting and Entrepreneurial Ventures

A study of accounting principles and procedures, leading to a review of financial statements and to an understanding of how accounting data are used to analyze business and economic activities.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ECON 191: Directed Study in Economics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ECON 195: Internship in Economics

Applied work with a private firm or public-sector agency in economics, arranged under the direction of an instructor in the department. In each case, the academic credit is based on related readings, reports, and presentations.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: ECON 300, 320, or 380; Counter Registration Required

ECON 200: Economic Development

This course seeks to provide students with a broad based understanding of economic development and the choices countries face. To obtain such an understanding, students will read the works of contemporary economists who provide a variety of approaches to poverty alleviation and the tradeoffs that must be confronted. Emphasis will be placed on close reading, class discussion, and on writing a number of papers that compare and contrast different views of economic development.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 276
Prerequisite: ECON 100

ECON 202: Global Economic Relations

This course covers the major concepts utilized in the field of international political economy. Major issues covered include debates about globalization, trade policy and free-trade agreements, monetary policy and currency regulation, aid and development, immigration policy and labor migration, global corporations, and international institutions such as the World Bank, IMF, and WTO.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 275
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ECON 100. GOVT 140 or GOVT 340 recommended.

ECON 203: Latin American Economic Development

This course combines economic theory, policy and historical accounts to understand the forces shaping Latin American economic development. Students will gain an understanding of major theories and trends in Latin American development while analyzing specific development issues, including equitable growth, agriculture, migration, gender equity, education, and health. Students will complete thoughtful critiques of readings, problem sets analyzing real data, and in-depth evaluations of specific issues.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 203
Prerequisite: ECON 100

ECON 204: Effective Altruism

Effective altruism acknowledges that individuals want to help others while examining the most effective ways to do so. Taking a global approach that draws on development, health and experimental economics, this course compares differences in relative welfare and opportunity and evaluates the effectiveness of causes like health interventions, cash transfers, and gender equity. Emphasis placed on close reading problem sets, quizzes, research papers and discussions.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 100

ECON 205: Introduction to International Economics

This course aims to develop an understanding of international economic issues and policies in open economies. The course will provide a general body of knowledge on topics such as gains from trade; patterns of trade; effect of trade on welfare; exchange rate policy regimes; international organizations; financial crises; and the effect of government policies on trade and the exchange rate. You will get exposed to economic modeling and learn analytical tools that can be applied to understand the changing world economy and analyze problems in international economic policy. You are encouraged to explore the potential and limitations of international economics in dealing with real-world problems. This course will assist you in improving your economic writing skills as well as your ability to read critically and understand discussions on international economic issues in the press.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 100

ECON 206: Field Experience in Development

Students engaged in this course will have the opportunity to do field research in a developing country. Each student will develop and implement a project that concerns economic, political, and/or environmental issues important in Sierra Leone, Jamaica, or another selected country. Students will also have the opportunity to learn from both national and local leaders in political, economic, environmental, and social development issues. Class members will travel to a developing country during a term break. Students must register for this course in the term prior to the planned travel and in the subsequent term, when they will present their research to the wider Lawrence community.

Location for 2016-17: Students will travel to Sierra Leone and/or Morocco during winter break. Admission is by application to Prof. Skran. Students should register for both fall and winter terms.
Units: 3.
Also listed as Government 401, Environmental Studies 311
Prerequisite: ENST 300, GOVT 248, GOVT 500 and RLST 240

ECON 208: Sustainable China: Environment and Economy

This course integrates environmental and economic topics relevant for understanding sustainability in the Chinese context, including economic development, natural resource management, urban growth, and environmental policy. It is a prerequisite for a December study trip to China.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 208, Environmental Studies 208
Prerequisite: Limited to students selected for the Sustainable China study trip

ECON 211: In Pursuit of Innovation

This course acquaints students with various aspects of innovation and entrepreneurship, broadly understood. Topics cover methodologies, theories, and history of innovation. The course focuses largely on projects pursued by teams which conceive and conduct ventures that illuminate innovation and entrepreneurship. Class activities include lectures, discussions, student presentations. Experienced guest experts will offer advice and guidance to student teams. May not be taken on an S/U basis.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Innovation & Entrepreneurship 100
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ECON 212: Corporate Finance

This course studies the function of finance and the flow of funds within the corporation. Topics include financial analysis, decision making, capital acquisition and use, and strategic planning. Three comptetencies will be emphasized: numeracy through financial analysis, decision-making based on financial information, and communication skills through conveying analyses and decisions to the end user (the board, shareholders, other stake holders). Lecture with case studies assignments, and exams.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Innovation & Entrepreneurship 212
Prerequisite: I-E 110

ECON 215: Comparative Economic Systems

This course introduces students to the different ways societies have organized economic activity in the past and in the present as well as to how economic and social policy questions are addressed under these different arrangements. Students will study the economies of the Western world, the former Soviet bloc countries, and Asian countries at various stages of economic development.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 100

ECON 223: Quantitative Decision-Making

The students will learn how to develop formal, quantitative approaches to structuring difficult problems, particularly those problems involving probabilistic factors. We will develop and practice the steps of defining a problem, gathering data, formulating a model, performing numerical calculations, evaluating numerical information, refining the model, analyzing the model's alternatives, and communicating the results.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Mathematics 223
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ECON 225: Decision Theory

This course will present a thorough introduction to decision theory, the study of how people should or do make decisions. Building on that foundation, game theory, the science of strategy, will be introduced, with economic applications.
Units: 6.

ECON 245: Law and Economics

Along with an introduction to legal analysis, a study of the political economy of four core areas of the law: property, contracts, torts, and crime and punishment. Applies rational-choice theories to both economic and political decisions involving the law.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 100 or consent of instructor

ECON 251: The Economics of London

This course provides a significant variation on the Urban Economics course (ECON 250) that is offered on campus. First, it focuses on one city, London UK, as the context for the analysis. Secondly, it addresses the London economy from both economic history and contemporary economic analysis perspectives. London has remained a vibrant city from the late middle ages to the present through a variety of changes to its character, its economy, and the diversity of its population.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Only open to students attending the London Centre.

ECON 252: Sustainable Cities

How can cities be sustainable? The increasing urbanization of the world's population, shift to service-driven economies, and growing diversity of cities make this question pressing and complicated. This course introduces economic, environmental, and social dimensions of the urban sustainability problem and explores responses to it through a two-week December study trip to London and Amsterdam and winter term studies and poster presentations. Program fee is required. Students pay their own airfare.
Units: 3.
Also listed as Government 252, Environmental Studies 252
Prerequisite: An introductory course in GOVT, ECON, ENST or GLST, or consent of instructor

ECON 255: Start-Up Theatre

Open to students from theatre, economics, and other students interested in entrepreneurship in the performing arts. Topics change each year. May be repeated when topic is different up to 6 total units.
Units: 1 TO 3.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 255, Innovation & Entrepreneurship 255
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ECON 271: Public Economics

Public economics covers a range of topics from taxation to social insurance and redistribution to homeland security. The course develops a template for framing and analyzing public policy issues that provides a basis for understanding the rationale for government intervention, the alternative policy instruments that can be used to affect economic outcomes, and the economic tools used to evaluate the effects of intervention.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 274
Prerequisite: ECON 100

ECON 280: Environmental Economics

The course shows how economists analyze environmental problems and the types of solutions they propose (if any). Topic coverage includes property rights and externalities, cost-benefit analysis, regulatory policy instruments, the interplay between policy and innovation, and basic models of political economy.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 280
Prerequisite: ECON 100 or ENST 151

ECON 290: The Economics of Medical Care

An analysis of how the economic organization of medical care affects the health and well-being of the population. Topics include who is treated, how much the treatment costs, and who pays the bill. Particular emphasis given to the roles of insurance and various national health policies and reform proposals.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biomedical Ethics 290
Prerequisite: ECON 100

ECON 291: Health Policy: A Comparison of U.S. and U.K. Approaches

This course compares U.K. and U.S. health systems, markets, and public health policies. In particular, the course will analyze trade-offs made in each country among access to care, the cost of care and the quality of care as well as how resources are generated and allocated for each system.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biomedical Ethics 291
Prerequisite: Only open to students attending the London Centre.

ECON 295: Topics in Economics

Each offering will build on modeling and reasoning techniques developed in the introductory-level courses (ECON 100 or 120). Topics depend on the instructor and will vary year-to-year. Topics include, but are not limited to, economics of the arts, financial economics, economics of sports, and economic history. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 100

ECON 300: Microeconomic Theory

A study of the microeconomic foundations of economics. The course focuses on equilibrium models for consumers and firms in competitive markets, as well as deviations from perfect competition.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ECON 100 and MATH 140 or MATH 130

ECON 320: Macroeconomic Theory

An exploration of contemporary theories of employment, income, inflation, and stabilization as regards the United States and other industrialized countries. Emphasis on the application of models to foster understanding of macroeconomic policy.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 130 or MATH 140, ECON 300

ECON 380: Econometrics

Statistical techniques and statistical problems applicable to economics, focusing on ordinary least-squares regression, classical inference, and detections of and adjustments for violations of the Classical Assumptions.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, MATH 107, MATH 130 or MATH 140, and previous course in economics

ECON 390: Tutorial Studies in Economics

Intermediate readings, discussions, and essays in economic problems of special interest to the student.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ECON 391: Directed Study in Economics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ECON 395: Internship in Economics

Applied work with a private firm or public-sector agency in economics, arranged under the direction of an instructor in the department. In each case, the academic credit is based on related readings, reports, and presentations.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: ECON 300, 320, or 380; Counter Registration Required

ECON 399: Independent Study in Economics

Intermediate research on a topic of the student’s choice, organized in consultation with an instructor.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ECON 400: Industrial Organization

Industrial organization is the study of how markets are structured and why it matters. The course begins with the standard applied microeconomic treatment of economic regulation (e.g., antitrust, natural monopoly, advertising restrictions) and then explores disequilibrating phenomena, including entrepreneurship and innovation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 300, ECON 380 recommended

ECON 405: The Economics of Innovation & Entrepreneurship

This course examines economic theories of innovation and entrepreneurship (I&E), the role of I&E in the economy, and policy questions related to I&E. Theories are discussed in the context of the history and current prevalence of innovation and entrepreneurship in modern economies.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 300

ECON 410: Advanced Game Theory and Applications

This course develops game theory, the science of strategic interaction, i.e., interdependent individuals seeking to promote their self interest, with applications in economics, biology, and philosophy. The mathematical nature of game theoretic models will be reflected in a focus on problem solving. Sufficient mathematical maturity required.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: MATH 130 or MATH 140; MATH 300 recommended

ECON 415: Individuality & Community

This course studies how political theorists responded to the emergence of open societies in the West. It focuses on the scope of personal autonomy, the consequences of commerce and luxury, the best political and economic arrangements, and other topics explored by writers from the Renaissance to the Twentieth Century.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 405
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor

ECON 420: Money and Monetary Policy

An examination of the role of money in market economies and its influence on the performance of such economies. This course emphasizes the role of central banks, financial institutions, and global capital flows.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 320

ECON 421: Investments

This course blends a web-based course on investment philosophies with classroom discussion of economic and valuation principles. It aims for students to develop an understanding of contemporary financial markets and instruments as well as how economic fundamentals apply to the evaluation of investment alternatives and strategies. Students will apply such knowledge to craft their own economic philosophies and implementation strategies.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: I-E 110 and at least one of ECON 300, ECON 320 or ECON 380

ECON 444: Political Economy of Regulation

This course focuses on the tension between politics and expertise that characterize the administrative regulatory state often called "the fourth branch of government." Several competing models of political economy shape an exploration of the continuing evolution of the U.S. regulatory system, the process by which regulations are proposed, written, implemented, and enforced, and the tools used to evaluate the costs and benefits of regulations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 444
Prerequisite: ECON 300 and ECON 380 recommended

ECON 450: Economics of the Firm

Even in a “market” economy, the preponderance of economic activity is carried out through firms and other organizations. The course examines economic theories of the firm, and explores some of the canonical questions, such as why are there firms, how the separation of ownership and control of a firm shapes decision making, what determines the boundary between organizations and markets (e.g., make-or-buy decisions), what types of firms are most innovative, and how new technologies affect organizational structure.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 300 or GOVT 271

ECON 460: International Trade

An inquiry into the historical and theoretical foundations of international trade, leading to a critical analysis of contemporary problems and policies.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 300

ECON 481: Advanced Econometrics & Modeling

The course explores advanced econometric topics in model specification, estimation, and prediction (e.g., two-stage least squares, limited dependent variables and logistic regression, nonparametric regressions, censored regressions, time-series analysis). Techniques are introduced through work related to the instructor’s areas of interest and expertise (e.g., labor, development, health, education).
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 380

ECON 495: Advanced Topics in Economics

Each offering will employ analytical techniques developed in the intermediate-level courses (Economics 300, 320, and 380.) Substantive topics might include, but would not be limited to, economics of the arts, economics of sports, computational finance, international finance, public sector economics, economics of the environment, and studies of specific industries. May be repeated when the topic is different.

Topic for Winter 2019: Globalization, Poverty, and Development
An exploration of how three mechanisms of economic globalization (trade, capital flows, and labor migration) interact with global poverty, inequality, and development. Prerequisite: ECON 300 and ECON 380
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 300

ECON 500: Advanced Microeconomics

Advanced topics in microeconomics that prepare students for a first graduate course in microeconomics.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ECON 300; MATH 300 or 310 recommended

ECON 590: Tutorial Studies in Economics

Advanced readings, discussions, and essays in economic problems of special interest to the student.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ECON 591: Directed Study in Economics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ECON 595: Internship in Economics

Applied work with a private firm or public-sector agency in economics, arranged under the direction of an instructor in the department. In each case, the academic credit is based on related readings, reports, and presentations.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: ECON 300, 320, or 380; Counter Regsitration Required

ECON 599: Independent Study in Economics

Advanced research on a topic of the student’s choice, organized in consultation with an instructor. Students considering an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ECON 601: Senior Experience: Reading Option

Students focus on a monograph &/or readings appropriate for advanced undergraduates, engage in active discussion, and produce a paper that expands upon or responds to the readings. Successful completion satisfies the department’s Senior Experience requirement.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Senior standing; at least two advanced economics courses (400- or 500-level)

ECON 602: Senior Experience: Research Paper Option

Students will produce a well-researched paper that meets standards of profession. To register, students must submit to instructor a paper prepared in a 400-level economics course with a one-page proposal on how it will be extended, refined and polished in content and form. Instructor’s approval of this proposal is prerequisite for registration.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Senior standing; at least two advanced economics courses (400- 500-level)

ECON 690: Tutorial Studies in Economics

Advanced readings, discussions, and essays in economic problems of special interest to the student.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ECON 691: Directed Study in Economics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ECON 695: Internship in Economics

Applied work with a private firm or public-sector agency in economics, arranged under the direction of an instructor in the department. In each case, the academic credit is based on related readings, reports, and presentations.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: ECON 300, 320, or 380; Counter Registration Required

ECON 699: Independent Study in Economics

Advanced research on a topic of the student’s choice, organized in consultation with an instructor. Students considering an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Education

Professor:B. Williams
Associate professor:S. Purkey (Bee Connell Mielke Professor of Education, chair) (on leave term(s) II)
Assistant professor:S. Burdick-Shepherd
Instructors:C. Despres-Berry (Center for Academic Success), D. DiFrancesca (Postdoctoral Fellow of Education)

While Lawrence does not offer a college major in education, the education department does prepare students to become licensed teachers in public and private schools. In addition, the department introduces students to the study of education as an academic discipline within the liberal arts. Courses in education studies (EDST) are open to all students and may be counted toward fulfilling the General Education Requirement (GER) in social sciences. The department also offers tutorial and independent-study opportunities for students interested in education policy, history of education, educational anthropology and psychology, and the practical application of education methodology.

Teacher certification for undergraduates

Students who seek certification to teach middle or senior high school (early adolescence through adolescence) may choose from nearly all majors, including the social sciences, history, the natural sciences, mathematics, mathematics-computer science, computer science, theatre arts, English, English as a second language, and environmental science. (Students planning to teach instrumental or vocal music must be admitted to the Conservatory. Please see the Conservatory of Music for more information.)

Students who want to teach art or foreign language (Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin, Russian and Spanish) and music (choral, general or instrumental) receive special-field certification for teaching early childhood through adolescence (K-12).

For certification in social studies and the natural sciences, students elect a single discipline as their major — for example, history or chemistry — and may also pursue an interdisciplinary “broad fields” course of study.

A few academic subjects (e.g., English) permit a “minor” for certification purposes, thereby affording the student both major and minor teaching opportunities in the schools. In all subject areas, certification requires completing a Lawrence major or its equivalent with a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the major and cumulative. Please see “Major Subject Area Requirements,” for specific disciplinary requirements.

Students who wish to qualify for a teaching license should plan their schedule with the chair of the education department as early as possible in their Lawrence career. Students who enter Lawrence knowing that they want to become certified to teach can do so within the four-year undergraduate program. Before student teaching, which must occur in the senior year or in a 13th term, students must be admitted to the teacher education program. Graduation must precede certification for licensure.

Generally, all education courses except EDST 175 and EDST 180 require sophomore standing. EDUC 560 or 563 and ART 585, methods of teaching, must be taken during the Term III that immediately precedes student teaching.

Student teaching assignments for 18-week public or private school semesters are contracted with local Fox Valley schools, in Chicago via the Chicago Center’s Urban Teaching Practicum or the ACM Urban Education Program, or overseas through Lawrence's International Student Teaching Program. Students may also apply to student teach overseas in one of 17 different countries (please see department chair for more information on this option). A 13th term of student teaching, tuition-reduced ($1,204), is available for Lawrence undergraduates who have completed all graduation requirements except the student teaching cluster of courses and wish to be certified. Ask the department chair for details and for information on additional requirements. This term must take place within one year of graduation.

In some majors, students planning to student teach during the senior year may substitute student teaching for, or incorporate it into, their department’s Senior Experience. Interested students should consult with their major advisor as early as possible in the junior year.

Certification for graduates

Students who have graduated from college can be certified for licensure through Lawrence. Typically, the certification program for graduates takes 1 1/2 years, which includes the required 18 weeks of student teaching. (Program length may vary depending on undergraduate major and coursework.) Graduates should consult the department chair for further information about the certification program.

Graduates seeking certification must attain qualifying scores on a standardized academic skills test (Praxis I PPST, Praxis Core, ACT, SAT or GRE) and pass the subject area test (Praxis II or ACTFL) in their certification area before they apply to be admitted to the teacher education program. Other requirements for admittance (e.g., 2.75 GPA) and certification are listed in Lawrence’s Teacher Certification Handbook, which is available from the education department

Tuition for Lawrence graduates participating in this program is set at 50 percent of the current year’s tuition rate, and the student teaching fee is adjusted by 50 percent.

For non-Lawrence graduates, tuition for courses required for certification outside the degree-seeking student program is set at 75 percent of the current year’s tuition rate. A separate fee is charged for the student-teaching portion of the program, for which the student earns 18 units of credit.

General requirements, all students and subject areas

In addition to the required education courses, all students seeking certification must complete a major (or its equivalent) in the subject they plan to teach. To receive a minor endorsement, students must complete a department-approved minor or seven courses in the discipline. Students seeking licensure must also complete the Lawrence University General Education Requirements, including a course in a non-Western history or culture, a course in a physical science, a course in a biological or life science and a mathematics course.

For Wisconsin licensure, social science majors need to take Cooperatives, which is an adjunct to Education 560. Natural science and social studies candidates are required to take an environmental studies course.

Students who want to become licensed must be admitted to Lawrence’s teacher education program. Please see the department chair or the department’s administrative assistant for the application form and list of requirements. Students seeking licensure should also consult Lawrence’s Teacher Certification Handbook, which is available from the education department, for further information and requirements.

A cumulative GPA of 2.75 is required for teacher certification. To be admitted to the teacher education program, candidates must attain qualifying scores on a standardized academic skills test (Praxis I PPST, Praxis Core, ACT, SAT or GRE). Before they may student teach, candidates for certification must pass a subject area test (Praxis II Subject Assessment or ACTFL foreign language oral and writing proficiency tests) for each subject in which they intend to be licensed. Beginning September 1, 2014, all candidates must attain passing scores on the edTPA, a teacher performance assessment completed during student teaching, in order to be certified for licensure.

Students should also be aware that certification requirements are subject to revision. It is the student’s responsibility to confirm requirements with the chair of the education department.

Required education courses for certification in all academic areas at the middle, junior and senior high school levels

(Please see “Major subject area requirements” and “The major in music education” for additional course requirements)

Course Lawrence course credit, in units Certification semester hours
EDST 180: Psychology of Learning 6 4
EDST 350: Ethnicity, Cultural Diversity and Education 6 4
EDUC 430: Educating All Learners (College only) 6 3
EDUC 431: Educating All Learners in Music (Conservatory only) 3 3
EDST 440: Sociology of Education 6 4

The appropriate teaching methods course for your certification area:

Course Lawrence course credit, in units Certification semester hours
EDUC 560: Methods in Middle and Secondary Teaching 6 4
EDUC 563: Elementary and Secondary Foreign Language Methods 6 4
EDUC 565: Methods, Materials and Assessment in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages†† 6 4
EDUC 585: Art in the Elementary and Secondary Schools††† 6 4
EDUC 650 or 655: Student Teaching 18 12
EDUC 660: Advanced Methods in Teaching 3 3

† Required for foreign language certification only
†† Required for ESL certification only
††† Required for art certification only

Major subject area requirements

Art
A major consists of the 11 courses required for a studio art major, plus ART 585. See Certification for Teaching K-12 for further information regarding studio requirements and recommendations for art education certification. ART 585 should be taken in the Term III immediately prior to student teaching (EDUC 650).
English
A major consists of a minimum of 10 courses. In addition to demonstrating a familiarity with contemporary literature of world scope, students must submit evidence of coursework in composition, linguistics or history of the English language, literature for adolescents and literature of minority groups in America. Adolescent literature may be fulfilled by taking three units of tutorial study in education (EDUC 390 or 590) devoted to literature for adolescents. A minor is available.
English as a second language (ESL/ELL)
A major endorsement is available in ESL/ELL and requires completion of the following: the education certification sequence (e.g., EDST 180, EDST 440, EDUC 650, etc.); the four course ESL/ELL sequence of Linguistics 150, Linguistics 360, Linguistics 530 and EDUC 565; and an academic major in any one of the liberal arts and sciences. Students may also add ESL/ELL certification to certification in another area (e.g., English, music education, biology, history, etc.).
Foreign languages
A major in Chinese, Classics, French, German, Japanese, Russian or Spanish consists of 10 courses. Seven courses make up the minor option, except in Russian, in which there is no minor. It is required that students spend a term in a country studying its native language. To be certified, students must pass an oral and writing proficiency test.
Mathematics-computer science; computer science
A major consists of 10 courses.
Mathematics
A major consists of 10 courses; a minor is available.
Music
See the major in music education.
Natural sciences
Students are licensed in physical science (chemistry and/or physics), earth and space science (geology), or life and environmental science (biology and/or environmental science). Students must complete a Lawrence major in one science (e.g., biology) and take at least one course from each of the other sciences. A course in astronomy or space science or a course that includes either as a topic is also required. Please see the department chair for further information.
Biology
A major consists of 10 courses, plus courses in other science subjects; a minor is available.
Chemistry
A major consists of 10 courses, plus courses in other science subjects; a minor is available.
Geology/Earth science
A major consists of 10 courses, including astronomy and oceanography, plus courses in other science subjects; a minor is available.
Physics
A major consists of 10 courses, plus courses in other science subjects; a minor is available.
Environmental science
A major consists of 10 courses, plus courses in the other science subjects; a minor is available. Students must take Education/Environmental Studies 400 and should fulfill the science-track requirements of the environmental studies major. (Students are urged to major in one of the other sciences and minor in environmental studies if they plan to teach at the secondary level.)
Broad fields science
A broad-fields science license is available. To be eligible, students must complete the requirements to be certified in one of the science majors (biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology/earth science and physics), a minimum of two courses in each of two other science disciplines and at least one course in each of the remaining sciences.
Social studies
Wisconsin licenses in the social sciences and history are grouped within the broad category of social studies. Students must complete a Lawrence major in any social science or history and take one course in each of the remaining social sciences (including history). An environmental studies course is also required. (Non-history majors are strongly urged to take a minimum of two history courses, one in U.S. history and one in global history.)
Anthropology/Sociology
A major consists of 10 courses; a minor is available. (Note: Wisconsin does not offer separate licensure in anthropology.)
Economics
A major consists of 10 courses; a minor is available.
History
A major consists of 10 courses; a minor is available.
Political science
A major consists of 10 courses; a minor is available.
Psychology
A major consists of 10 courses; a minor is available.
Broad fields social studies
A broad-fields social studies license is available. To be eligible, students must complete the requirements to be certified in one of the social sciences or history (anthropology/ sociology, economics, history, political science and psychology), a minimum of two courses each in two of the other social studies and at least one course in each of the remaining social studies. Instruction in consumer cooperatives and conservation is incorporated into the methodology course Education 560.
Theatre arts
A major consists of 10 courses; a minor is available.

Courses - Education

EDUC 191: Directed Study in Education

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 390: Tutorial Studies in Education

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational psychology, learning theory, cognitive science, alternative education and on various topics related to teaching and learning.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 391: Directed Study in Education

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 399: Independent Study in Education

Advanced study arranged in consultation with the department. Students considering a senior honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 412: Teaching Reading for Elementary

For students pursuing elementary certification and preparing for the Foundations of Reading Test. Students will engage with literacy theory, explore reading development and the acquisition of reading competency, plan for literacy assessment and instruction (with attention to English language learners and learning disabilities), and integrate literacy with content instruction.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: EDST 180 and junior standing

EDUC 430: Educating All Learners

This course for students in the Teacher Education Program focuses on two important aspects of K-12 teaching: (1) helping learners develop academic and disciplinary literacy; and (2) tailoring instruction to specific learning needs (for students with disabilities, English language learners, struggling readers, students with gaps in academic knowledge, gifted students, etc.). Practicum of 20 hours required in a subject area class that includes learners with special needs.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: EDST 180 and junior standing

EDUC 431: Educating All Learners - Music

This course for students seeking certification to teach music (choral, general, and/or instrumental) focuses on adapting music instruction to learners with disabilities. Practicum of 10 hours required in a music class that includes learners with special needs.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: EDST 180, junior standing, and declared major in music education

EDUC 555: Methods in Elementary Teaching

For students preparing to teach in the elementary classroom. Students will practice and observe methodologies in instructional strategies, assessment, and organization of the elementary environment. Students will analyze how learner, subject, and environment influence pedagogical choice with emphasis on collaborative learning, differentiated instruction, and developmentally appropriate practice.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and admission to the teacher certification program

EDUC 560: Methods in Middle and Secondary Teaching

A seminar on methods and organization of teaching particular subjects in the middle and secondary school, including English, social studies, mathematics, science, and theatre. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and admission to certification program

EDUC 563: Elementary and Secondary Foreign Language Methods

A seminar on teaching foreign languages in the elementary, middle, and secondary school. Emphasis on curriculum planning, methods of instruction, and assessment of learning. Issues related to classroom management and organization will be addressed. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and admission to certification program

EDUC 565: Methods, Materials, and Assessment in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

A seminar in teaching English to speakers of other languages in elementary, middle, and secondary school as well as in foreign language classrooms abroad. The course focuses on curriculum planning, methods of instruction, and assessment of learning for English language learners in diverse learning environments. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor

EDUC 575: Elementary Content Area Methods I

This course is for students concurrently enrolled in the elementary student teaching apprenticeship. The apprenticeship will design and teach lessons engaging elementary students and young children in the fundamental content, concepts, and inquiry tools of mathematics, English language arts, social studies, science, fine arts, physical education and health. Two-course sequence.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree, admission to elementary teacher certification, and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 665 and EDUC 675

EDUC 576: Elementary Content Area Methods II

Continuation of EDUC 575.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: EDUC 575 and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 666 and 676

EDUC 585: Art in the Elementary and Secondary Schools

Art class observations, studio practice in both two- and three-dimensional disciplines, studio demonstrations/lectures, and selected readings and discussions relative to the visual expression of the elementary, junior, and senior high school student.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 585
Prerequisite: Four studio art courses, EDUC 180 and 340, and two art history courses.

EDUC 590: Tutorial Studies in Education

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational psychology, learning theory, cognitive science, alternative education and on various topics related to teaching and learning.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 591: Directed Study in Education

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 599: Independent Study in Education

Advanced study arranged in consultation with the department. Students considering a senior honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 650: Student Teaching (Middle and Secondary Schools)

Student teaching is normally taken during Term I, coinciding with the public school fall semester. A weekly seminar at Lawrence is required as part of this course. See department chair for prerequisites and for exceptions to the Term I requirement.
Units: 18.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and admission to certification program; contact department chair about prerequisites and corequisites

EDUC 655: International Student Teaching

This is an overseas student teaching option. After nine weeks of student teaching in the Fox Valley, students will be placed in one of 16 countries to complete the student teaching practicum. International student teaching is available during 13th Term only. Students must have been admitted to the student teaching program (college or conservatory) and have met all requirements for domestic student teaching. Students should contact the department chair for additional admission and fee requirements.
Units: 18.
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status, admission to the student teaching program and to the international student teaching program, passing score on Praxis II or ACTFL, proficiency tests and, beginning in 2015, a passing score on the TPA during the first 9 weeks of domestic student teaching.

EDUC 660: Advanced Methods in Teaching

The seminar will engage students in critical reflection upon their student teaching experience. Concrete and theoretical problems having to do with teaching and learning will be explored (e.g., classroom management, assessment of pupil performance, curriculum design, instructional methods), as will issues having to do with educational policy and school organization.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 650 or consent of instructor

EDUC 665: Advanced Methods in Teaching-Elementary I

The seminar will engage students in critical reflection upon their elementary student teaching experience. Concrete and theoretical problems of teaching and learning will be explored (e.g., classroom management, assessment, curriculum design), as will issues regarding educational policy and school organization. Two-course sequence taken in conjunction with the student teaching apprenticeship.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree, admission to elementary teacher certification and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 575 and 675

EDUC 666: Advanced Methods in Teaching-Elementary II

A continuation of EDUC 665.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: EDUC 665 and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 576 and EDUC 676

EDUC 675: Student Teaching Apprenticeship-Elementary I

Student teaching for elementary licensure (EC-MC) is a full-time, two-semester apprenticeship in a K-6 grade classroom setting. This post-baccalaureate apprenticeship is an embedded clinical experience whereby the student teacher will learn the craft and art of teaching under the guidance of a master teacher from the Appleton Area School District.
Units: 18.
Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree, admission to elementary teacher certification, and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 575 and EDUC 665

EDUC 676: Student Teaching Apprenticeship-Elementary II

Continuation of EDUC 675.
Units: 18.
Prerequisite: EDUC 675 and concurrent enrollment in EDUC 576 and EDUC 666

EDUC 690: Tutorial Studies in Education

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational psychology, learning theory, cognitive science, alternative education and on various topics related to teaching and learning.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDUC 691: Directed Study in Education

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDUC 699: Independent Study in Education

Advanced study arranged in consultation with the department. Students considering a senior honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Education Studies

The minor in education studies provides students in the college and conservatory with the opportunity to pursue focused inquiry into the philosophical, cultural, and social foundations of education; the historical and present-day relationship between school and society; the part formal education plays in human development; and/or contemporary issues of education policy and practice. The minor will help prepare students for graduate study or work in education-related fields.

Required for the education studies minor

  1. Three foundational courses:
    • EDST 180: Psychology of Learning
    • EDST 350: Ethnicity, Cultural Diversity and Education
    • EDST 440: Sociology of Education
  2. One of the following courses:
    • EDST 309: Hollywood Goes to High School
    • EDST 315: Philosophy of Children
    • EDST 345: Distributed Cognition
    • EDST 400: The Environment, Community and Education
    • EDST 450: Topics in Education Studies (can be repeated as topics vary)
    • EDST 545: Gesture Studies
    • PSYC 260/265: Developmental Psychology
    • PSYC 460: Adolescent Psychology
  3. Both of the following with approval from an Education Department faculty member:
    • One additional course in education studies or in another department as preparation for the academic internship or independent study below
    • An academic internship (EDST 395/595) or independent study (EDST 399/599) appropriate to the student’s interest in education studies

Possible settings for internships include but are not limited to: public, private, or charter schools; school district offices; museum or arts organizations; other non-profit or community organizations; social services agencies; governmental bodies; policy or advocacy groups; and other approved sites. Students seeking teacher certification may also complete the Education Studies minor, but student teaching may not be used to fulfill the internship or independent study requirement, nor may the internship substitute for the classroom practicum hours required prior to student teaching.

Courses - Education Studies

EDST 180: Psychology of Learning

An investigation of how people learn. This course examines learning theories (e.g., behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, constructivist) and their implications for the educational process in schools. Other topics include learning and the brain, the nature of expertise, the design of learning environments, and approaches to instruction that promote meaningful learning. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 180

EDST 191: Directed Study in Education Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 195: Internship in Education Studies

Internship in a school or district office, museum or arts organization, other non-profit or community organization, social services agency, governmental body, policy or advocacy group, or other education-related setting with prior approval. (Does not count toward teacher certification.) The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter registration required.

EDST 270: Why Read Children's Books?

This seminar explores the complex ways children's literature affect readers of all ages. We will immerse ourselves in reading works from Where the Wild Things Are to Charlotte's Web as we examine what it means to be a reader of children's literature by looking at our own and children's responses to the experience and joy of reading. Discussion, reflective writing and collaborative community projects.
Units: 6.

EDST 309: Hollywood Goes to High School

Year after year, Hollywood turns out movies that are set in schools and present images of teachers and teens. Many of these films address typical coming-of-age issues, societal fear of teen crime and delinquency and, of course, the search for romance. A subset of these films provide powerful and culturally enduring images of teachers and teaching. High school movies also provide insight into the fantasies, anxieties, dreams, and assumptions prevalent in American culture. This course will examine the world and worldview found in Hollywood high school movies and the extent to which the stories they tell make us who we are.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 309
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 310: Ethics and Education

What is ethics and how does it connect with morals? What do either have to do with the activities of teaching and learning? Students in this class confront such questions by exploring the role of moral decision-making in classroom practices, and by examining how the practice of education promotes certain notions of human flourishing. Particular attention is given to an analysis of the "ethics of teaching." Readings draw from classical and contemporary works associated with the disciplines of philosophy and of education.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 315: Philosophy of Children

Students will consider childhood and children through a philosophical lens. The first half of the course will focus on the philosophy of childhood, the second half will focus on how children philosophize the world. Readings will derive from philosophical texts, fiction and children's literature, and social media. Field experiences will be conducted in elementary classrooms encouraging children's wonder through philosophical discussion.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 345: Distributed Cognition and the Extended Mind

The new science of the mind treats cognition as a distributed process involving the brain, body, and world. This seminar explores the role of material settings and tools, bodily engagement, social interaction, and cultural processes in human reasoning, problem solving, and learning. Students will write short papers examining aspects of cognitive activity in real-world settings.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 345, Psychology 345
Prerequisite: PHIL 105 recommended

EDST 350: Ethnicity, Cultural Diversity, and Education

A study of the experience of children and adolescents from different ethnic, cultural, and economic groups. Emphasis on understanding the social consequences of these differences and how such differences affect educational achievement and attainment. The sources and educational effects of individual, institutional, and systemic racism, sexism, and other forms of prejudice and discrimination will also be examined. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 352
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 380: Engaging in Action Research

This course engages students in social science research to collect and use data to solve real problems. Students interested in careers that emphasize working with others (teaching, counseling, nursing, social work) will find this course particularly relevant. Content will explore methods of examining instructional effectiveness. Lab will consist of classroom-based research experiences, data analysis, and collaborative inquiry.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: EDST 180 and Sophomore standing

EDST 390: Tutorial in Education Studies

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational policy, environmental education, history of education, comparative education and on various topics related to the social foundations of education.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDST 391: Directed Study in Education Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 395: Internship in Education Studies

Internship in a school or district office, museum or arts organization, other non-profit or community organization, social services agency, governmental body, policy or advocacy group, or other education-related setting with prior approval. (Does not count toward teacher certification.) The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter registration required.

EDST 399: Independent Study in Education Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDST 400: The Environment, Community, and Education

The course will examine the relationship between community-mindedness and the development of ecological literacy. Cultural assumptions about the natural world and our place in it that are implicit within the K-12 and college curriculum, and the manner in which modern forms of education shape our understanding of what it means to “live well in a place we know well” will be explored. Examples of how schools can contribute to environmental and social sustainability (and justice) via community- and place-based education will be presented.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 460
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

EDST 440: Sociology of Education

An examination of the social foundations of education in the United States with particular attention paid to the cultural, political, and economic functions of education in modern society. Other topics include the reproductive function of schooling in a society divided along lines of race/ethnicity and class, schools as sites of cultural production, and the historical tension in the U.S. between “equality” and “excellence” in education. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 340
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

EDST 450: Topics in Education Studies

This seminar explores issues in contemporary education. Topics vary by term and focus on controversies or innovations in educational systems, practices, and policy or in the relations between school and society. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Winter 2019: Psychology of Failure
Failure is a scary term. But what, exactly, are the consequences of failing? Is failure always negative or can it be positive? If so, how? This course will explore the role of failure in our lives, particularly as it relates to learning and motivation (academic and nonacademic) from both a psychological and philosophical perspective.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and one course in education studies or instructor approval

EDST 590: Tutorial in Education Studies

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational policy, environmental education, history of education, comparative education and on various topics related to the social foundations of education.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDST 591: Directed Study in Education Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 595: Internship in Education Studies

Internship in a school or district office, museum or arts organization, other non-profit or community organization, social services agency, governmental body, policy or advocacy group, or other education-related setting with prior approval. (Does not count toward teacher certification.) The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter registration required.

EDST 599: Independent Study in Education Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDST 690: Tutorial in Education Studies

Tutorial studies in the fields of educational policy, environmental education, history of education, comparative education and on various topics related to the social foundations of education.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

EDST 691: Directed Study in Education Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

EDST 695: Internship in Education Studies

Internship in a school or district office, museum or arts organization, other non-profit or community organization, social services agency, governmental body, policy or advocacy group, or other education-related setting with prior approval. (Does not count toward teacher certification.) The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter registration required.

EDST 699: Independent Study in Education Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

English

Professor:M. Dintenfass
Associate professors:C. Barnes, G. Bond, K. Hoffmann (on leave term(s) II, III), L. Khor, D. McGlynn (chair), T. Spurgin (Bonnie Glidden Buchanan Professor of English Literature)
Assistant professor:M. Range

Required for the English minor

Six six-unit courses in English, distributed as follows:

  1. Two courses from the following introductory and intermediate group: ENG 150, 230, 240, 250, 260, 280, 281
  2. One course focusing on periods before 1800: ENG 170 (London Centre course), 400, 420, 425, 430, 435, 440, 443, 445, 446, 448, 450, 470, 527
  3. One course focusing on the nineteenth century: ENG 455, 460, 465, 472, 473, 474, 476
  4. One course focusing on the twentieth or twenty-first centuries: ENG 480, 483, 485, 490, 495, 498, 500, 501, 503, 510, 515, 516, 517, 518, 521
  5. One additional course in English

Required for the Creative Writing Minor

For students majoring in English, completing the Creative Writing minor requires taking a minimum of three courses in creative writing, including courses in at least two different literary genres. These courses can be at any level. THAR: 427 Playwrighting may also be used to fulfill one of the courses in the minor.

For students with majors outside of English, completing the Creative Writing minor requires taking a minimum of three courses in literary studies at any level in the English department as well as a minimum of three courses in creative writing. These creative writing courses need to include work in at least two different literary genres and can be at any level. Again, THAR: 427 Playwrighting may also be used to fulfill one of the courses in the minor.

Certification for Secondary teaching in English

Students preparing to teach English in secondary schools should bear in mind that they must have from 30 to 40 semester hours of preparation in English for certification. Freshman Studies and Literary Analysis (ENG 150) count toward certification. Requirements for the major satisfy requirements for certification in Wisconsin, except that the student seeking certification must satisfactorily complete at least one course in writing (e.g., ENG 350, 360, or 370); at least one course in linguistics or the English language (e.g., LING 105 or 150); a tutorial in literature for adolescents; and either ENG 260, or 510 or a tutorial in literature by writers of color in America. Please refer to the Department of Education listing for more detailed information on preparation for teacher certification.

Advanced Placement

All students who have earned a 4 or better in the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Exam will be given credit for one course in English; for majors, this credit will fulfill the requirement of “one additional course in English.” All students who have earned a 4 or better in the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Exam will be given credit for one course in English and will receive advanced placement in courses at the intermediate level (ENG 230, 240, 250); for majors, this credit will fulfill the requirement of ENG 150. Questions about exemption and placement should be addressed to the department chair. The application of AP credit towards the general education requirements for either the B.A. or the B.Mus. degrees will be determined by university policy. Please see the following link for more information about university credit for AP Examinations.
AP Examination Information (PDF)

Graduate School

Students considering graduate work in English are advised that they should try to take two or more English department classes with at least two different members of the department. They will likely want to do more English course-work than the minimum that is required for the major. For the master’s degree, most graduate schools require demonstrated proficiency in at least one modern foreign language. For the doctorate, the usual requirement is demonstrated proficiency in two modern foreign languages, and, in some cases, also an ancient language. ENG 525: Contemporary Critical Theory is also an asset when preparing for graduate school. College work leading toward graduate study should be planned with these considerations in mind.

The English Department at Lawrence offers students the opportunity to develop their skill at critical reading, writing, and analysis--skills that can be applied not only to "literary" texts but also to the texts and images produced by the cultures that surround us. Literature courses include analysis of British, American, African American, and postcolonial cultures. In creative writing, the department offers courses in fiction, poetry, and non-fiction.

Required for the English major

  1. ENG 150 or its equivalent
    After ENG 150, students majoring in English are required to complete eight six-unit courses, distributed as follows:

  2. Two courses from the intermediate group: ENG 230, 240, 250, 260, 280, 281
  3. Two courses focusing on periods before 1800: ENG 400, 420, 430, 435, 440, 443, 445, 446, 448, 450, 470, 527, and either 425 or 170 (but not both together)
  4. One course focusing on the nineteenth century: ENG 455, 460, 465, 472, 473, 474, 476
  5. One course focusing on the twentieth or twenty-first centuries: ENG 480, 483, 485, 490, 495, 498, 500, 501, 503, 510, 515, 516, 517, 518, 521
  6. One additional course in English
  7. In completing requirements 2-6, students are required to take course-work representing a range of literary and cultural traditions. Students are required to take at least one course, at any level, from each of the following three categories: 1) British, 2) American, and 3) African American, OR postcolonial. A course in African-American literature may satisfy either categories 2) or 3), but not both simultaneously. See list below for which courses correspond to which group.
  8. Finally majors are also required to complete the English Department’s Senior Experience (see further explanation below).

Cultural traditions categories for the major

Students must take at least one course, at any level, from each of the following three categories:

  1. British: ENG 170 (London Centre course), 230, 240, 281, 400, 420, 425, 430, 435, 440, 445, 446, 448, 450, 455, 460, 465, 480, 515, 527
  2. American: ENG 250, 443, 470, 472, 473, 474, 476, 483, 485, 495, 498, 500, 501, 503, 510, 515
  3. African American: ENG 260, 472, 510 OR postcolonial: ENG 280, 282, 517, 518, 521

Departmental advisors

When students officially declare themselves English majors, they should choose a departmental advisor who will be responsible for guiding them in planning and completing their major course of study. Questions about the advising of English majors should be addressed to the department chair

Senior Experience in English

Students pursuing double majors or double degrees are encouraged to consult with faculty from the English department and the other major department prior to taking Eng 600 if they wish to undertake a research topic that draws upon both of their majors.

Students pursuing double majors or double degrees also have the option of doing an honors project that is interdisciplinary in nature, as long as one of the directors of the project is a professor in the English department.

Courses - English

ENG 150: Literary Analysis

An introduction to the techniques of literary analysis through the detailed study of individual texts.
Units: 6.

ENG 170: Shakespeare in London

Students will study several plays by William Shakespeare selected from among the current offerings by the Royal Shakespeare and other companies. Discussions will address the plays themselves, production techniques, and the audiences to whom they appeal. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 170
Prerequisite: Must be attending Lawrence London Centre

ENG 189: British and International Soccer Culture

A study of the myths, narratives, and cultural implications of the British and international football (soccer) industry, from its Victorian roots to its global present. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

ENG 191: Directed Study in English

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 230: British Writers I

Intensive study of five or six major British authors from Chaucer to Swift. Emphasis on close reading and critical writing.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or sophomore standing

ENG 240: British Writers II

Intensive study of five or six major British authors from Wordsworth to Yeats. Emphasis on close reading and critical writing.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or sophomore standing

ENG 245: The Long Novel

A comparative study of nineteenth century Europoean realism, with readings taken from a variety of national traditions. Authors studied may include Dickens, Flaubert, and Dostoevsky. Collaborative teaching of each text will expose participants to a wide range of critical and pedagogical methods. With instructor approval students may also register for an additional tutorial (3 units) in which we will read and discuss important theoretical works on the history of the novel form.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Russian 260
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ENG 250: American Writers

Intensive study of major American authors from Emerson to Hughes. Emphasis on close reading and critical writing.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or sophomore standing

ENG 260: African American Writers

A survey of African American literature from slave narratives through contemporary literature. Readings include works by Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, and Toni Morrison.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 360
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or sophomore standing

ENG 263: Greek and Roman Drama in Translation

In this course we analyze ancient plays both as great works of literature and as artifacts of a particular artistic, cultural, and political context. Students will read excerpts and complete plays in English from a variety of ancient authors, including (from Classical Athens) Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander, and (from late Republican and early Imperial Rome) Plautus, Terence, and Seneca.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 363, Classics 363
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 265: Greek and Roman Epic in Translation

An examination of ancient epic literature through the study of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid, all read in English translation. Emphasis on the important features and themes of the epic genre, ancient conceptions of the hero, and the literary, cultural, and political resonance of these texts in classical antiquity.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Classics 370
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 280: Postcolonial Writers

An introduction to major postcolonial works in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Readings include novels by African, Asian, and Caribbean authors such as Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, and Jean Rhys.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 280
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or consent of instructor

ENG 281: History of the Book in London

An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of the history of the book, focusing especially on London's role as a site of book production, distribution and consumption. We will work directly with manuscripts and rare books, studying the material history of books and writing techniques form early manuscripts to iPads. Offered at the London Centre.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 384
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre.

ENG 285: Biblical Narratives in Literature

An interdisciplinary exploration of the retelling of biblical narratives in modern literature. We will examine novels and poems that revisit biblical scenes, from the binding of Isaac to the crucifixion of Jesus, as independent literary works and in comparison to the biblical text and its retellings in early exegesis.
Units: 6.

ENG 350: Creative Writing: Non-Fiction

Practice in the writing of non-fictional prose.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 360: Creative Writing: Fiction

Practice in the writing of short fiction.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 370: Creative Writing: Poetry

Practice in the writing of poetry.
Units: 6.

ENG 390: Tutorial Studies in English

Tutorial study in the literature of various periods, English and American, and in literary forms and composition. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. Arrangements should be discussed with the department chair.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 391: Directed Study in English

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 399: Independent Study in English

Advanced study, arranged in consultation with the department chair. Students considering an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 410: Newtonian Lit: Chronicles of a Clockwork Universe

Newtonian Lit is a course that investigates the connections between the literature and science of the Enlightenment, particularly with respect to contemporary notions of space and time. Students will analyze important texts from the fields of English and Physics, notably Laurence Sterne’s The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman and Isaac Newton’s Principia.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Physics 215
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent, plus any introductory course in the natural sciences (e.g., PHYS 141), plus sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENG 420: Studies in Medieval Literature

A study of Middle English literature and culture, focusing especially on the oral and performative dimensions of literature produced between 1300 and 1550.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 425: Shakespeare

An introduction to Shakespeare’s plays and their literary, historical, and theatrical context.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 432
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 430: Renaissance Literature

A selected study of poetry and prose in Sixteenth Century England. Readings will include Spenser's Faerie, Queene, and lyric poetry from Wyatt to Sidney.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 435: Renaissance Drama

A study of eight to ten plays from the early modern period, excluding Shakespeare. Readings include Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton and Webster.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 436
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 440: Milton and the 17th Century

A study of Donne and the metaphysical poets, the poetry and prose of Milton, and the poetry of Dryden. Emphasis on Milton.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 441: John Donne and the Metaphysical Poets

This lecture/discussion class will explore the rich historical, sexual, and religious tensions of 17th century British poet, courtier, and Anglican priest, John Donne. We will also explore the same tensions, manifested very differently, in the poetry of Donne's contemporary poet-priest, George Herbert. Students will write short weekly papers and a substantial final paper. In addition to Donne and Herbert, we will also read works by Sir Thomas Wyatt, Andrew Marvell, and others.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 250 or ENG 260, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 443: New England Puritan Poetry

A study of New England Puritan poetry in the context of new world spiritual aspirations and anxieties. Readings will include sections of Martin Luther's writings and Perry Miller's and others' criticism, as well as the poems of Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Michael Wiggelsworth, and other minor and post-Puritan poets.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 343
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ENG 445: Restoration and 18th-Century Comedy

A study of English comedies as reflections of changing taste and thought in the period 1660-1800. Authors include Wycherley, Etherege, Congreve, Farquhar, Steele, Fielding, Goldsmith, and Sheridan.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 434
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 446: Gender and Enlightenment

This course will examine writings by both men and women that reflect on the changing social roles for women in eighteenth-century Britain. Focusing on women's labor, reproduction, reading, and writing, the course will consider to what extent women could participate in the project of the Enlightenment.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 446
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 447: Eighteenth-Century Terrors

In this discussion course, we'll consider British poetry and prose of the eighteenth century specifically designed to frighten readers in order to uncover just what anxieties—cultural, racial, political—these texts are meant to awaken. Students will complete numerous short assignments, a group research project, and a researched term paper. Authors might include: Defoe, Walpole, Gray, Radcliffe, Austen.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 448: Enlightenment Selves

An interdisciplinary investigation of key concepts of identity and the emotions as understood during the Enlightenment. Students examine philosophical and literary texts to uncover how seventeenth and eighteenth century people conceived of their mental and emotional existence, and how these historical conceptions still influence contemporary theories of mind and self.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 448
Prerequisite: One course in either English or philosophy, or junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 451: The Revolutionary Eighteenth Century

Eighteenth-century Britain was bookended by revolutions of the political sort—the Glorious Revolution (1688) and the French Revolution (1789)—yet also rife with revolutions of the social sort: abolition, women's rights, libertinism, etc. We'll consider prose, poetry, and fiction from the period, paying particular attention to how they're imagining social and other forms of change. Regular short assignments, group research project, and researched term paper. May not be taken by students who have already earned credit for ENG 450.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 230, or consent of instructor

ENG 455: Romanticism

A study of the period from 1790 to 1830, focusing on the development and elaboration of what we now call Romanticism. Readings in the major authors of the period: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 460: The Victorian Age

A study of the period from 1830 to 1900, focusing on poetry, fiction, and critical prose. Readings range widely, including selections from Carlyle, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Rossettis, and Oscar Wilde.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 465: The English Novel

A study of English fiction from 1740 to 1900. Readings include novels by Richardson, Burney, Austen, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 467: Jane Austen and the History of the Novel

Intensive study of Austen's achievement and legacy. In additon to her six novels, readings will include books by earlier and later writers. these readings will help us to trace Austen's development as a writer and to consider her crucial place in literary history. Regular short assignments, brief oral reports, and a final examination.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 474: American Poets of the Nineteenth Century

This course will read across the spectrum of nineteenth-century American poetry, considering how and why writers turn to this versatile genre as their preferred mode of expression. Readings from Dickinson, Piatt, Melville, Whitman, Harper, Horton, Larcom, and others.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, an intermediate course in English, or consent of the instructor.

ENG 476: Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers

An exploration of 19th century women writers, including Sigourney, Harper, Stowe, Jacobs, Dickinson, Harding Davis, Chopin, Lazarus, Johnson, Zitlaka-sa and/or others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 476
Prerequisite: Junior standing, an intermediate course in English, or consent of instructor.

ENG 478: 19th C African-Amer Writers

This lecture/discussion class will explore the rich literature African-American authors created, against great adversity, in nineteenth-century America. We will read works by Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Charlotte Forten Grimke, Paul Laurence Dunbar and others. Students will write short weekly papers and a substantial final research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 478
Prerequisite: ENG 250, ENG 260, or junior standing; or consent of instructor

ENG 480: Modernist British Fiction

A study of selected works of British fiction in relation to early 20th-century thought. Authors include Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Mansfield, Forster, Woolf, and others.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 240, or consent of instructor

ENG 481: Joyce's Ulysses

An intensive study of Ulysses, covering the entire novel. Discussions will focus on Joyce's experiments with language and narration, his exploration of human psychology and sexuality, and (time permitting) his unique sense of humor. Seminar with short papers.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor

ENG 483: American Autobiography

A study of prominent American autobiographies from the 19th and 20th centuries. The course will examine how autobiography responds to social, cultural, and aesthetic conditions and the relationship of the genre to the larger American literary tradition.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250, or consent of instructor

ENG 490: Modern Drama

Studies in some of the major playwrights in Europe, England, and America from the time of Ibsen to the present.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 440
Prerequisite: Junior standing, an intermediate course in English, or consent of instructor

ENG 495: Modernist American Fiction

A study of American fiction from the first half of the 20th century. Authors include Wharton, Cather, Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison, and others.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250, or consent of instructor

ENG 500: Contemporary American Fiction

Examination of selected works of American fiction, with particular emphasis on the literary movements of the post-World War II era, including postmodernism, multiculturalism, regionalism, and other topics. The course will include a diverse array of readings, which will vary by term and topic, as well as selected films and theoretical texts.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250, or consent of instructor

ENG 501: The Graphic Novel

In recent years, graphic novels have taken a decidedly autobiographical turn as an increasing number of artists explore their own personal histories though a genre typically reserved for the fantastic and imagined. This course will examine a diverse array of contemporary graphic novels, ranging from popular comics to autobiography to experimental forms. Though the course will concentrate primarily on American graphic novels, it will include works produced by writer-artists in Asia, Western Europe, and elsewhere.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 250, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 502: Contemporary Jewish-American Literature

A survey of contemporary American-Jewish authors, as Phillip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, Paul Auster, Art Spiegelman, Jonathan Safran-Foer, and others, exploring the question of identity, gender, minor-literature, religion, immigration, and heritage. The course will also examine the two key components of these works -- Jewish and American -- and inquire into their validity.
Units: 6.

ENG 503: Contemporary American Poetry

Examination of selected works of American poetry with particular emphasis on the post-World War II era. The course will consider individual poets’ responses both to poetic traditions and to formal and thematic innovations of the 20th century.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250, or consent of instructor

ENG 504: Multiethnic American Literature

A study of selected works reflecting the ethnic and cultural diversity of American literature, with primary attention to minority voices and experiences. Selected texts will center on a specific theme such as hybridity, migration, or belonging. Works are taught in their literary, historical, and cultural context, critical readings will also be incorporated. Students will complete several short writing assignments and a researched term paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 504
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or the equivalent

ENG 506: Contemporary African-American Women Poets

In this lecture/discussion course, we'll look at the great stylistic variety of poetry that Black women have been writing during the past twenty years. Students will consider poetry through the lenses of critical race and gender criticism and will write weekly short papers and a substantial research paper. Poets may include Marilyn Nelson, Natasha Trethewey, Claudia Rankine, Tracy K. Smith, Nikky Finney and others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 506, Gender Studies 506
Prerequisite: ENG 250, ENG 260, or junior standing; or consent of instructor

ENG 510: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance

A study of poetry, fiction, and essays by African American writers from the era of World War I through the 1930s. Authors include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Nella Larsen, W.E.B. Du Bois, and others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 561
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250 or 260, or consent of instructor

ENG 515: Gender and Modernist British/American Literature

A study of the construction of gender in early 20th-century fiction and poetry. Authors include Cather, Woolf, Lawrence, Hemingway, Sassoon, and others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 445
Prerequisite: Junior standing, an intermediate course in English or gender studies, or consent of instructor

ENG 516: Literature and Human Rights

An interdisciplinary investigation of the aesthetics and ethics of representing human rights and their violations in literature and film. Texts include novels, plays, essays, and films on topics such as genocide, torture, and development.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 516
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 280, or consent of instructor

ENG 517: Topics in Human Rights

This course will address an advanced topic in the study of human rights such as human rights and narrative forms, ethical witnessing, or humanitarianism.

Topic for Fall 2018: Children's Rights and Children's Literature
What do children’s books teach toddlers, tweens and teens about their human rights and responsibilities? This course explores how children’s literature (ranging from picture books to young adult books) shape the ideas young people have about themselves, their power, and their place in the world.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor

ENG 518: Narratives of Inequality

Is globalization really shrinking the global divide between rich and poor, or is this mere fiction? To explore this question, we will examine contemporary novels and films that showcase individuals in India and China as they grapple with issues such as economic migration, class struggle, and terrorism.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 518
Prerequisite: ENG 280, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 521: Narratives of International News

A study of the literature that re-presents world events in different ways from the mainstream news media. Texts include novels, memoirs, graphic novels, or documentary dramas.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 521
Prerequisite: ENG 280, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENG 522: Literature and the Environment

An interdisciplinary investigation of the ways that literature shapes environmental values and practices as well as responds to environmental concerns. We will study novels, films, and essays on topics such as organic food and farming, air and water pollution, and environmental justice movements.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 522
Prerequisite: Junior standing

ENG 525: Contemporary Critical Theory

A survey of important movements. Among the readings are selections by Derrida, Foucault, and Bakhtin as well as selections from more recent figures, such as Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Cornel West, and bell hooks.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor

ENG 527: History of the Book

To provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Book History, which should help students think more critically about the impact of material culture on intellectual activity. The course will be taught as a speaking intensive seminar, which means that students will frequently be responsible for presenting reading material and leading discussion in the first half of class.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 385
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

ENG 550: Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction

A writing workshop for students with previous creative writing experience.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 350 or ENG 360

ENG 560: Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

A workshop for students with previous fiction writing experience.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 360 or consent of instructor

ENG 562: Advanced Creative Writing: Novel Writing

Course for students composing creative, book-length works of prose.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 350 or ENG 360, and ENG 550 or ENG 560

ENG 565: Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

A workshop for students with previous poetry writing experience.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 370 or consent of instructor

ENG 568: Poetry as Practice

This workshop-based course is for advanced poetry students who would like to delve more deeply into the craft of poetry. The course will include intensive readings in contempoary poetry and poetics, frequent poetry workshops, and a practical introduction to the world of publishing. Sudents will produce a substantial poetry portfolio and will write several short papers and craft professional documents related to poetry publication. Recommended for students interested in applying to graduate programs in poetry.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENG 370 and ENG 565

ENG 590: Tutorial Studies in English

Tutorial study in the literature of various periods, English and American, and in literary forms and composition. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. Arrangements should be discussed with the department chair.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 591: Directed Study in English

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 599: Independent Study in English

Advanced study, arranged in consultation with the department chair. Students considering an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 600: Senior Seminar in English

A seminar involving analysis of theoretical, historical, critical, and literary readings at an advanced level in conjunction with students' research and writing of an original, substantial paper. Each section of the seminar will focus on a theme that can accommodate variety in students' individual research projects.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Majors only; junior standing for spring term, otherwise, senior standing; at least two English courses numbered 400 or above

ENG 690: Tutorial Studies in English

Tutorial study in the literature of various periods, English and American, and in literary forms and composition. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. Arrangements should be discussed with the department chair.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 691: Directed Study in English

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENG 699: Independent Study in English

Advanced study, arranged in consultation with the department chair. Students considering an honors project should register for this course.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Environmental Studies

Professors:M. Bjornerud (Walter Schober Professor of Environmental Studies Geology), J. Clark (Geology), B. De Stasio (Dennis and Charlot Nelson Singleton Professor of Biological Sciences Biology), C. Skran (Edwin & Ruth West Professor of Economics and Social Science Government), M. Stoneking (Physics)
Associate professors:J. Brozek (Stephen Edward Scarff Professor of International Affairs Government), D. Gerard (The John R. Kimberly Distinguished Professor of the American Economic System Economics), W. Hixon (Gordon R. Clapp Chair of American Studies Government), M. Jenike (Anthropology), A. Knudsen (Geology), S. Purkey (Bee Connell Mielke Professor of Education Education) (on leave term(s) II), M. Rico (History, chair), J. Sedlock (Biology) (on leave term(s) I, II, III)
Assistant professors:I. Del Toro (Biology), D. Donohoue (Chemistry), A. Hakes (Biology)
Visiting assistant professors:C. Kervin (Freshman Studies), R. Ribbons (Freshman Studies)
Instructor:S. Colon (Hurvis NEH Fellow in the Humanities)

The field of environmental studies addresses some of the most critical and complicated issues of our time: those regarding environmental change and the future of humanity. The systems that make up planet Earth are simultaneously comprehensible and complex, predictable and chaotic, robust and fragile. Changes in one part of this system of systems may have far-reaching implications for other parts. As citizens of Earth, we cannot afford to remain ignorant of the global environmental consequences of our daily activities.

A degree in environmental studies prepares students for a wide spectrum of careers, including environmental law, consulting, policy making, technical innovation, wildlife management, teaching, natural resource management, and fundamental research. Students in the major share a common sequence of core courses, beginning with introductions to environmental science and policy through an intermediate level practicum and culminating with the senior capstone. Throughout the curriculum, majors are exposed to different perspectives on and tools for understanding the environment including those from the natural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. In addition, all students are required to take advanced courses in one department to provide disciplinary depth. Students have considerable choice in their courses and work with their advisor to select courses that fit individual interests and career goals. The field experience requirement ensures that students get out of the classroom to put their academic work into practice.

The minor in environmental studies is designed to complement a major in any field.

Environmental Studies Major

  1. Required Core Courses (30 Units)
    1. ENST 150: Introduction to Environmental Science with Lab (6 units)
    2. ENST 151: Introduction to Environmental Policy (6 units)
    3. ENST 300: Symposium on Environmental Topics (6 units)
    4. ENST 650: Environmental Studies Senior Seminar (6 units)
    5. MATH 107, 117 or 207; Statistics or BIOL 170: Integrative Biology: Experimental Design and Analysis or ANTH 207: Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology (6 units)
  2. Perspectives from Science (18 Units)
    Three additional science courses from at least two different departments, one of which must be lab-based and one of which must be 200 or above.

  3. Perspectives from Policy (12 Units)
    (ECON 280 or ECON 285) and (GOVT 270 or GOVT 380)

  4. Perspectives from History, Society, and Culture
    HIST 355 or EDST 400 or PHIL 360 or ANTH 310

  5. Disciplinary Focus (18 units)
    Eighteen units from courses numbered 200 or above in a single department GOVT, ECON, CHEM, BIOL, GEOL, ANTH,and PHYS, selected in consultation with advisor.

  6. Field Experience (not necessarily for credit; typically about 50 hours of work outside the classroom or participation in an ENST-related internship or off-campus program)

Environmental Studies Minor

  1. Required Core Courses (18 Units)
    1. ENST 150: Introduction to Environmental Science with Lab (6 units)
    2. ENST 151: Introduction to Environmental Policy (6 units)
    3. ENST 300: Symposium on Environmental Topics (6 units)
  2. Courses with significant emphasis on environmental topics (30 units)
    Any five environmental studies cross-listed courses. Environmental studies courses taken through Lawrence-sponsored off-campus programs, such as the Semester in Environmental Science may also fulfill this requirement, with approval of the Environmental Studies Steering Committee. Special note: No more than three courses may be applied simultaneously toward completion of this minor and a student's major.

Senior Experience in Environmental Studies

The Senior Seminar (ENST 650) is the culmination of the Environmental Studies major and serves as the program's Senior Experience. Through discussions of primary literature and guest lectures, students are engaged with cutting-edge scholarship in the natural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. Students also complete individual projects, which consist of developing temporal or spatial models of environmentally relevant phenomena. In the course of modeling, students must find and acquire relevant data, determine functional relations between model elements, perform sensitivity analyses, and justify their choices and assumptions. Results and conclusions are presented orally and in a written document. The 6-unit course is offered once a year and has ENST 150, ENST 151 and ENST 300 as prerequisites.

Courses - Environmental Studies

ENST 115: Energy Technology, Society, and the Environment

Explores energy production, storage, and usage as they are currently practiced. Certain emerging technologies will also be addressed. Environmental and socio-economic impact will be discussed in the context of limitations imposed by the laws of physics.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Physics 112

ENST 127: Environmental Justice and Citizenship

Environmental degradation impacts some individuals and communities more than others: the poor, people of color, and certain nonhuman species and landscapes bear the brunt of our collective actions. This seminar pairs literary texts (novels, short stories and poems) with nonfiction essays on topics ranging from food production to indigenous rights. We will discuss and write about how these texts impact our understanding of fairness, justice, rights and responsibility.
Units: 6.

ENST 150: Environmental Science

Presents principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics that relate to such environmental issues as resource limitation, pollution, and environmental degradation. Designed to foster understanding of scientific measures of environmental quality. One laboratory per week.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Geology 150
Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing; consent of instructor required for juniors and seniors

ENST 151: Introduction to Environmental Policy

This course applies principles of economics and political science to environmental issues, including pollution, resource limitation, and environmental degradation. It is designed to foster an understanding of the environmental policy-making and regulatory process in the United States and globally.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 151, Economics 151

ENST 191: Directed Study in Environmental Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 195: Internship in Environmental Studies

An opportunity for environmental studies students to gain practical experience in the commercial, government, or nonprofit sectors. The internship is supplemented by readings and discussions with a supervising faculty member. At the conclusion of the internship, the student must submit a summative report that considers the internship experience in the context of the student’s other academic work. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 200: Topics in Environmental Studies

Study of a particular topic of current interest in environmental studies. Topics will vary with each offering of the course, and may include field research, community engagement, or other experiential learning opportunities. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 1 TO 6.

ENST 202: Geology and Health

A course investigating the links between geology and health, with a particular focus on environmental issues in urban areas and ties to the field of environmental justice. The course considers issues such as human lead exposure from soil and water, and the links between air pollution and asthma. This course includes a lab component in which students will be collecting and analyzing soil, air, and water samples.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Geology 213
Prerequisite: GEOL 110, ENST 150, or CHEM 116

ENST 208: Sustainable China: Environment and Economy

This course integrates environmental and economic topics relevant for understanding sustainability in the Chinese context, including economic development, natural resource management, urban growth, and environmental policy. It is a prerequisite for a December study trip to China.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Economics 208, Government 208
Prerequisite: Limited to students selected for the Sustainable China study trip

ENST 210: Animal Behavior

A lecture and field-study course examining the principles and problems of animal behavior. Subjects include orientation, feeding, locomotion, communication, escape in time and space, biological rhythms, mate choice, and aspects of social behavior, examined from evolutionary, ontogenetic, physiological, ecological, and ethological perspectives. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 200
Prerequisite: BIOL 150

ENST 213: Evolutionary Biology

A study of biological evolution, including natural selection, adaptation, the evolution of sex, speciation, extinction, and constraints on evolutionary change. Reading primary literature is emphasized. Two lectures and one discussion per week.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 235
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 or ANTH 140

ENST 220: General Ecology

An introduction to the interactions between organisms and the environment. Explores the role of physical, chemical and biotic processes--including human activities--in determining the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Topics include resource availability, competition, predation, symbiosis and natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as disease, biological invasions, pollution and climate change. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 230

ENST 222: Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry

This course focuses on the fundamental chemical processes that control Earth's atmosphere, ocean, soil, and climate. The course emphasizes the mechanisms that regulate the flow of energy in different ecosystems, the environmental role of particulate matter and solar radiation, chemistry-climate relationships, and the anthropogenic impact on the environment.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chemistry 212
Prerequisite: CHEM 116

ENST 229: General Ecology (Lecture Only)

An introduction to the interactions between organisms and the environment. Explores the role of physical, chemical and biotic processes--including human activities--in determining the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Topics include resource availability, competition, predation, symbiosis and natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as disease, biological invasions, pollution and climate change. Lecture only.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 229

ENST 230: History of the Earth and Life

A study of the physical, chemical, and organic evolution of the Earth since its origin 4.5 billion years ago, with emphasis on times of change and crisis. The course also examines the evolution of ideas about Earth’s history, illustrating how science and culture are inherently entangled.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Geology 210
Prerequisite: GEOL 110

ENST 235: Weather, Climate, and Climate Change

A study of basic meteorologic principles and climate patterns. These phenomena will be discussed in relation to evidence of past climate change and implications of global warming on future climate.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Geology 214
Prerequisite: GEOL 110 or 150

ENST 237: Environmental Remote Sensing and GIS Applications

Fundamentals of electromagnetic radiation and the interaction of radiation with matter are introduced as the basis of remote sensing. Interpretation and manipulation of remotely sensed images are used to demonstrate the wealth of information remote sensing provides. Applications and case studies from geology, environmental science, ecology, agronomy, and urban planning will be explored. High school physics recommended. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Geology 220
Prerequisite: GEOL 110; high school physics recommended

ENST 240: Chemistry of the Earth: Low-Temperature Environments

An introduction to the geochemical processes at the Earth¿s surface. Emphasis is placed on how chemical processes such as thermodynamics, phase equilibria, and oxidation-reduction reactions shape the Earth surface and near-surface environments.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Geology 240
Prerequisite: GEOL 110 and CHEM 115; concurrent enrollment in GEOL 245

ENST 245: Conservation Biology

This course explores scientific concepts related to the conservation and restoration of Earth's biological diversity. Topics include patterns of species and ecosystem diversity, the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, causes of extinction, assessing extinction risk, behavioral indicators, in-situ and ex-situ management strategies for endangered species, and ecosystem restoration. Lecture only.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 245
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and sophomore standing

ENST 250: Analytical Chemistry

A course in the quantitative description of chemical equilibria in solution (acid-base, complexation, redox, solubility) using classical, separation, electrochemical, and spectrochemical methods of analysis. This course covers methods of quantification, statistics, and data analysis as applied to modern chemistry. Students will have the opportunity to individually design projects. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chemistry 210
Prerequisite: CHEM 116, placement exam, or consent of instructor

ENST 252: Sustainable Cities

How can cities be sustainable? The increasing urbanization of the world's population, shift to service-driven economies, and growing diversity of cities make this question pressing and complicated. This course introduces economic, environmental, and social dimensions of the urban sustainability problem and explores responses to it through a two-week December study trip to London and Amsterdam and winter term studies and poster presentations. Program fee is required. Students pay their own airfare.
Units: 3.
Also listed as Government 252, Economics 252
Prerequisite: An introductory course in GOVT, ECON, ENST or GLST, or consent of instructor

ENST 260: Research Methods in Archaeology

Presents the research process in archaeology and offers an overview of essential data-collection and analysis techniques, including site survey and excavation, settlement pattern analysis, lithic analysis, and ceramic analysis. Students will take part in field research.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 220
Prerequisite: ANTH 120

ENST 265: Biogeochemistry

This course explores fundamental cycles between earth's major reservoirs of nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon and water. Through lecture and group presentations, students will gain a solid understanding of the fundamentals of biogeochemical cycles and the mechanism underlying the biological transformations of those elements. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 265, Geology 265
Prerequisite: BIOL 130 or GEOL 110

ENST 270: Global Environmental Politics

This course provides an examination of the environment as an issue in world politics. Emphasis will be placed on the role of both state and non-state actors (i.e., the UN, NGOs) in global environmental regimes that are designed to deal with global warming, ozone depletion, and other environmental issues. Particular attention will be paid to the positions taken by both developed and developing countries. As part of the course, students will participate in a simulation of an international negotiation on an environmental issue.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 270
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or ENST 150 or GOVT 110

ENST 280: Environmental Economics

The course shows how economists analyze environmental problems and the types of solutions they propose (if any). Topic coverage includes property rights and externalities, cost-benefit analysis, regulatory policy instruments, the interplay between policy and innovation, and basic models of political economy.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Economics 280
Prerequisite: ECON 100 or ENST 151

ENST 300: Symposium on Environmental Topics

The heart of this course is an annual symposium organized around a well-defined topic with both scientific and policy components — e.g., nuclear waste disposal, global warming. Each year, two or three nationally recognized experts on the selected topic are brought to campus. In the weeks before a visit by one of the major speakers, students, together with environmental studies faculty, read and discuss papers suggested by the speaker. The speakers meet with students in the seminar following their public lecture, providing students with an opportunity to interact directly with scientists and policy makers at the forefront of environmental issues.

Topic for Spring 2019: Environmental Justice
This course will explore the theory and practice of environmental justice, from local to global. We will investigate the intersectionality of environmental issues with race, gender, class, and power. Learning will progress through field trips, guest speakers, readings, and frequent class discussions. Students will complete community-based learning projects in groups, in addition to short writing assignments.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ENST 150, sophomore standing

ENST 310: Aquatic Ecology

The principles of the ecology of fresh waters, developed through discussions, laboratory, and field investigations of the functional relationships and productivity of biotic communities as they are affected by the dynamics of physical, chemical, and biotic parameters. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 330
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 170 (or concurrent enrollment) or BIOL 230

ENST 311: Field Experience in Development

Students engaged in this course will have the opportunity to do field research in a developing country. Each student will develop and implement a project that concerns economic, political, and/or environmental issues important in Sierra Leone, Jamaica, or another selected country. Students will also have the opportunity to learn from both national and local leaders in political, economic, environmental, and social development issues. Class members will travel to a developing country during a term break. Students must register for this course in the term prior to the planned travel and in the subsequent term, when they will present their research to the wider Lawrence community.

Location for 2016-17: Students will travel to Sierra Leone and/or Morocco during winter break. Admission is by application to Prof. Skran. Students should register for both fall and winter terms.
Units: 3.
Also listed as Government 401, Economics 206
Prerequisite: ENST 300, GOVT 248, GOVT 500 and RLST 240

ENST 320: Seminar in Selected Topic in Environmental Studies

A course designed to offer students an opportunity to study important issues in environmental studies not covered in other regularly offered courses. Activities may include the reading and analysis of material from primary literature, consideration of interdisciplinary connection, and field and laboratory activities.

Topic fo rFall 2018: Community Read: Ross Gay's Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude
Poet Ross Gay, winner of the Kingsley Tufts Award and a finalist for the National Book Award and the National Books Critics Circle Award, will be speaking on campus in October. In the weeks prior to his campus visit, we will meet 4 times to discuss his 2015 collection Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, a book that "studies the wisdom of the garden and orchard, those places where all—death, sorrow, loss—is converted into what might, with patience, nourish us." Discussion may touch on topics including nature and culture; environmental justice and sustainability; pain, joy, and hope, and more. This course has no papers and no grading.
Topic for Winter 2019: Community Read: Deal the Life of the Great Lakes
The Great Lakes hold one fifth of the world’s fresh surface water, yet they’ve been under threat by invasive species, water diversion projects, and more recently climate change. Dan Egan details the environmental history of one of our most precious local resources in his book Death and Life of the Great Lakes. Join us in small reading group discussion of the book over the course of winter term.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: ENST 150 or consent of instructor.

ENST 330: Advanced Geochemistry

A more detailed investigation of geochemical principles and processes through the investigation of important geochemical issues. Readings come heavily from the primary literature.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Geology 340
Prerequisite: GEOL 240 and CHEM 115, or consent of instructor; CHEM 116 recommended

ENST 335: Physics of the Earth: Surface Environments

This course studies the movement of water, solute, and sediment through the landscape and the resulting properties and distribution of surficial earth materials and landforms. Topics include weathering; soil development; runoff; mass movement; river, glacial, and coastal processes; and deposition in sedimentary environments. One lab per week.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Geology 360
Prerequisite: GEOL 110 and 240 or consent of instructor; PHYS 141 or 151 recommended

ENST 340: Plant Ecology

This course emphasizes core concepts in ecology and evolution from the unique perspective of plants. Students will explore the interactions between plants and their environment over a range of scales; from individuals to populations and communities. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 335
Prerequisite: BIOL 170

ENST 345: Terrestrial Field Ecology

A hands-on course intended to demonstrate basic ecological principles using local terrestrial ecosystems. Field research projects will introduce students to methods in hypothesis development, experimental design, data collection, statistical analysis, and scientific writing and presentation. Research topics will include estimating population size, community structure, plant-animal interactions, and foraging behavior. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 345
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 170, and sophomore standing

ENST 355: History of the American Environment

North Americans have transformed the environment while being shaped by nature in turn. This course surveys the changing relationships between Americans and their physical environment in historical context from the 17th century to the present. Topics include the “Columbian exchange,” agriculture, urbanization, conservation, and the emergence of contemporary environmentalism.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 355
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ENST 360: Environmental Ethics

An examination of some ethical assumptions that might figure in discussions of environmental policy by economists, legal experts, philosophers, and policy scientists.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 360
Prerequisite: One course in economics or environmental studies or government or philosophy; or junior standing

ENST 365: Ecological Anthropology

A study of relationships between human communities and their natural environments (i.e., humans studied as members of ecosystems). Topics include the interactions between environment, human biology, and social organization and anthropological perspectives on global environmental problems.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 310
Prerequisite: One anthropology course or consent of instructor

ENST 370: Religion and the Biosphere

A look at how humans have made sense of existing in the biosphere. We will examine views on the nature of life in religious traditions like ancient Egypt and Jainism as well as early philosophical accounts. The second half will involve a close reading of Charles Darwin and reflection on resources offered by religious traditions to respond to the "sixth extinction." Lecture/discussion with written assignments and journaling on the coming of spring.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 205
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ENST 378: East Asian Environmental History

This course will explore traditional East Asian ideas about the relationship between humans and their natural environments, as well the premodern and modern history of that interaction. We will also consider the relationship between these philosophies and practice, both for the societies we study and for our own.
Units: 6.
Also listed as East Asian Studies 378
Prerequisite: Some background in East Asian Studies or Environmental Studies is recommended.

ENST 380: Ecological Modeling

An integrated lecture and computer laboratory introduction to the process of developing mathematical descriptions of the interactions between components of a population, community, or ecosystem, and the use of computer simulation as a tool for understanding ecology and natural resource management. Topics include population growth, predator-prey and competitor interactions, biogeochemical cycling, and mass balance in ecosystems.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 380
Prerequisite: At least one of the following: BIOL 229, BIOL 230, BIOL 245, BIOL 330, BIOL 335 or BIOL 345

ENST 387: Let Us Arise: Ireland's Deep Time

Taking a dramaturgical and geographical approach to explore a deep sense of place, we will use the lens of culture (drama, poetry, fiction, music, film, history and visual arts) to investigate the variegated quality of Ireland's land and its people.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 387
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ENST 150, ENST 151, or THAR 327

ENST 390: Tutorial in Environmental Studies

Advanced study and analysis of a particular topic or case related to environmental issues, viewed from the perspective of more than one academic discipline.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 391: Directed Study in Environmental Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 395: Internship in Environmental Studies

An opportunity for environmental studies students to gain practical experience in the commercial, government, or nonprofit sectors. The internship is supplemented by readings and discussions with a supervising faculty member. At the conclusion of the internship, the student must submit a summative report that considers the internship experience in the context of the student’s other academic work. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 399: Independent Study in Environmental Studies

Advanced independent research, under the guidance of a faculty mentor or mentors, on a particular topic related to the environment. The student is required to produce a formal paper or equivalent (e.g., poster session, Web page, presentation at a professional meeting) as a tangible record of the work carried out.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 410: Ecological Energetics

Field and laboratory experimental investigations of the transfer and transformation of energy or energy-containing materials between and within organisms and populations of aquatic ecosystems. Part of the Marine Biology Term. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 434
Prerequisite: BIOL 330, concurrent enrollment in BIOL 505 and 226 and consent of instructor

ENST 420: The Geography of Life: Biodiversity in a Changing Planet

Earth is a dynamic and changing planet, comprised of tightly linked ecosystems and organisms. In this course we explore relationships between the biotic and abiotic drivers that influence the distribution of global diversity. We use large-scale datasets to develop practical skills for monitoring the responses of biodiversity to environmental change.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 420
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and BIOL 170; preferred but not required: BIOL 230 and BIOL 235

ENST 430: Watershed Hydrology

An introduction to the basic components of the hydrologic cycle, focusing on surface water and groundwater systems. Measurement and analysis of hydrologic data are emphasized. Application to contemporary issues such as flooding, watershed development, and groundwater contamination will be discussed.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Geology 430
Prerequisite: GEOL 110; PHYS 141 or 151 recommended

ENST 460: The Environment, Community, and Education

The course will examine the relationship between community-mindedness and the development of ecological literacy. Cultural assumptions about the natural world and our place in it that are implicit within the K-12 and college curriculum, and the manner in which modern forms of education shape our understanding of what it means to “live well in a place we know well” will be explored. Examples of how schools can contribute to environmental and social sustainability (and justice) via community- and place-based education will be presented.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Education Studies 400
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENST 470: Environmental Politics

An examination of selected aspects of environmental policy in the United States. Topics include the historical development of US environmental policy, environmental justice, urban environmental issues, connections between food systems and the environment, and the application of economic reasoning to environmental policy making.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 465
Prerequisite: ENST 151 and junior standing, or consent of instructor

ENST 478: Topics in Environmental History

An in-depth examination of a particular topic in environmental history, suitable for majors in history and environmental studies. Students from other majors should consult the instructor before registering. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.


Units: 6.
Also listed as History 478
Prerequisite: HIST 355

ENST 494: Music and the Environment

In many societies around the world, people use music to connect with nature, specific places, and surrounding environments. This course will explore music performance practices and repertoire that expresses or enacts these connections. Case studies will include songlines and Australian Aboriginal land claims, North American protest songs, and the intimate relationships between music and nature of the BaAka people in central Africa and among the Kakuli people in Papua, among others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Musicology 494
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ENST 505: Coral Reef Environments

Examines the ecology of coral reef environments. Lecture, laboratory, and field components. Part of the Marine Biology Term. Lecture and laboratory.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 505
Prerequisite: BIOL 330 and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 226 and BIOL 434

ENST 522: Literature and the Environment

An interdisciplinary investigation of the ways that literature shapes environmental values and practices as well as responds to environmental concerns. We will study novels, films, and essays on topics such as organic food and farming, air and water pollution, and environmental justice movements.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 522
Prerequisite: Junior standing

ENST 590: Tutorial in Environmental Studies

Advanced study and analysis of a particular topic or case related to environmental issues, viewed from the perspective of more than one academic discipline.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 591: Directed Study in Environmental Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 595: Internship in Environmental Studies

An opportunity for environmental studies students to gain practical experience in the commercial, government, or nonprofit sectors. The internship is supplemented by readings and discussions with a supervising faculty member. At the conclusion of the internship, the student must submit a summative report that considers the internship experience in the context of the student’s other academic work. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 599: Independent Study in Environmental Studies

Advanced independent research, under the guidance of a faculty mentor or mentors, on a particular topic related to the environment. The student is required to produce a formal paper or equivalent (e.g., poster session, Web page, presentation at a professional meeting) as a tangible record of the work carried out.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 650: Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

A seminar on issues and methods of environmental studies and a focal point of the environmental studies major. Topics include scientific measures of environmental quality, natural resource management, pollution, prices, and public policy and ethical considerations. Students employ data and models to address a chosen environmental problem. Faculty members from contributing disciplines participate.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: ENST 150, ENST 300, and senior standing; or consent of the instructor

ENST 690: Tutorial in Environmental Studies

Advanced study and analysis of a particular topic or case related to environmental issues, viewed from the perspective of more than one academic discipline.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 691: Directed Study in Environmental Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 695: Internship in Environmental Studies

An opportunity for environmental studies students to gain practical experience in the commercial, government, or nonprofit sectors. The internship is supplemented by readings and discussions with a supervising faculty member. At the conclusion of the internship, the student must submit a summative report that considers the internship experience in the context of the student’s other academic work. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ENST 699: Independent Study in Environmental Studies

Advanced independent research, under the guidance of a faculty mentor or mentors, on a particular topic related to the environment. The student is required to produce a formal paper or equivalent (e.g., poster session, Web page, presentation at a professional meeting) as a tangible record of the work carried out.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Ethnic Studies

Professor:L. Vetinde (French and Francophone Studies)
Associate professors:A. Balsekar (Government), E. Carlson (Art and Art History), C. Daughtry (Anthropology, chair), S. Downing (Conservatory of Music), K. Hoffmann (English) (on leave term(s) II, III), L. Khor (English), B. Miller (Conservatory of Music), A. Ongiri (Jill Beck Director of Film Studies Professorship Film Studies Program), S. Purkey (Bee Connell Mielke Professor of Education Education) (on leave term(s) II)
Assistant professors:J. Encarnacion (Conservatory of Music), M. Range (English), J. Smith, B. Zinsli (Art and Art History)

Drawing upon its own inter-disciplinary body of theory, concepts and methodological approaches, Ethnic Studies at Lawrence provides intellectual environments in which students can participate in meaningful dialogue about topics too often shrouded in silence. Ethnic Studies appeals to students who want to explore the evolution of ethno-racial identities in both U.S. domestic and global contexts, and examine current issues pertaining to race and ethnicity. Students take Ethnic Studies courses to enhance their own ability to negotiate multi-ethnic and inter-racial relationships and to thrive in workplace diversity. Students broaden their own worldview when they study concepts of ethnicity and learn what it means to identify with an ethnic group on the basis of national origin, family heritage, shared historical experience, customs and traditions, and/or language. Students think critically about the concept of race when they explore how race is a recent human invention, how race is about culture and politics and not biology, and how race and racism are still embedded in institutions and everyday life.

The Ethnic Studies minor at Lawrence offers two core courses that introduce students to theory, concepts and approaches from the social sciences (ETST 200: Race and Ethnicity in the United States) and the arts and humanities (ETST 210 Expressions of Ethnicity). Students take at least one of the two core courses and four additional elective courses, at least one from each of two categories — domestic and global — to build a minor that reflects individual student interests in certain topics or current debates, specific ethno-racial communities, geographic areas, or historical time periods. In a senior capstone requirement, students may choose from a range of options designed to bring reflection and focus to their Ethnic Studies experience.

Required for the minor in ethnic studies

  1. One of the two core courses:
    1. ETST 200: Race and Ethnicity in the United States
    2. ETST 210: Expressions of Ethnicity
  2. Four additional courses, at least one from each of two categories — domestic and global — and representing course work from at least two different departments. No more than two courses may count toward the student's major. A student may choose to do the second core course as one of the electives.

    Domestic: courses that focus on the experience of a major ethnic group in the United States or on relations among ethnic groups in the United States. Examples include but are not limited to:
    1. ETST 222: History of the American West
    2. ETST 240: Sociology of Education
    3. ETST 241: Ethnicity, Cultural Diversity, and Education
    4. ETST 321: Race Relations in the United States, 1865-Present
    5. ETST 330: Indians of North America
    6. ETST 360: Survey of African American Literature
    7. ETST 380/381: "Ideal Immigrants"? The German Experience in America
    8. ETST 420: The American Civil War
    9. ETST 430: American Indians on Film
    10. ETST 561: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance

    Global: courses that focus on the experience of ethnicity and relations among ethnic groups outside the United States or comparative courses that include both the United States and other parts of the world. Examples include but are not limited to:
    1. ETST 121: Traditional East Asian Civilization
    2. ETST 221: Europe in the Age of Nationalism, World War, and Totalitarianism, 1851-1990
    3. ETST 223: Nationalism In Modern History
    4. ETST 230: Ethnography of Sub-Saharan Africa
    5. ETST 251: Immigration and Refugees: Changing the Face of Europe
    6. ETST 320: Empire and Nation in Russian History
    7. ETST 322: Modern Japanese History
    8. ETST 325: Ethnicity in Latin America
    9. ETST 332: Ethnography of the Middle East and North Africa
    10. ETST 334: Race and Ethnicity in East Africa
    11. ETST 382: The Literature and Culture of Ethnic Minorities in Germany
    12. ETST 480: Latin American Civilization and Culture
    13. ETST 481: Spanish Civilization and Culture
    14. ETST 560: Contemporary British and Post-Colonial Fiction
    15. ETST 583: Hispanic Issues
    16. ETST 584: Black Cultural Nationalisms

    Courses cross-listed in ethnic studies will count toward completion of the minor whether students register for them using the program's designation (ETST) or an individual department's designation. A student may choose to do the second core course as one of the electives. No more than two courses used for the minor may count towards the student's major, and no more than two courses may be taken from one department.

  3. C average in the minor

Senior Experience in Ethnic Studies

Students must choose one of the five following options in consultation with the program’s steering board:

  1. ETST 695: Ethnic Studies Field Experience Includes work in the community, such as tutoring on the Oneida Reservation, accompanied by a written reflection on the experience. Must be supervised by an Ethnic Studies faculty member.
  2. Upper-level independent study in Ethnic Studies for at least three units, supervised by an Ethnic Studies faculty member
  3. Participation in the ACM Urban Studies program. Students are required to submit a written reflection on an aspect of the program that directly relates to issues of race and/or ethnicity.
  4. EDUC 565: Methods, Materials, and Assessment in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
  5. Student teaching in an ethnically diverse K-12 classroom or program. Students are requested to submit a written reflection on an aspect of the experience that directly relates to issues of race and/or ethnicity.

Courses - Ethnic Studies

ETST 110: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

Introducing interdisciplinary approaches to the study of race and ethnicity in mostly U.S. history and contemporary social issues. Topics including the emergence of ethnic studies as an interdisciplianary field; racial and ethnic formations in relation to colonization, slavery and migration; immigration; and resistance and social movements. Students learn through lecture/discussion with papers, presentations and exams.
Units: 6.

ETST 120: Modern Africa Since 1800

The history of Africa from the end of the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present. We will discuss the effects of abolition on Africa, the nature of pre-colonial African societies on the eve of conquest, the European "Scramble for Africa," the colonial era, African nationalism and decolonization, and the post-colonial period. Themes will cover social, political, economic, and religious history.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 125

ETST 121: Traditional East Asian Civilization

An introductory survey of East Asia from the dawn of indigenous civilization to the 16th century. Focus on the growth of a Sinitic center and its interaction with the sedentary and nomadic peoples on its Inner Asian and Pacific rims. Emphasis on the diverse peoples and societies of the area and the historical processes that bound them together through a common tradition.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 160, East Asian Studies 140

ETST 191: Directed Study in Ethnic Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ETST 195: Internship in Ethnic Studies

Practical experience working with diverse population, focused on volunteer, policy, or advocacy work. For example, students might volunteer to tutor youth in ethnically diverse educational programs, or work with a local immigrant relocation agency. Students work for 5-10 hours a week, depending on the amount of credit being earned, meet periodically with the instructor, and submit a written reflection connecting the experience to their academic work in Ethnic Studies. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

ETST 210: Expressions of Ethnicity

An introductory course in which film, theatre, literature, visual arts, and music are analyzed in an effort to explore the many ways in which ethnicity is expressed, reflected, and constructed in American culture. Issues of identity, authenticity, impersonation, commodification, stereotypes, integration, and audience will be raised.
Units: 6.

ETST 220: Atlantic Slave Trade

An examination of the Atlantic trade in enslaved Africans from its beginning in the 15th century to its eventual abolition in the 19th century. Topics include ideas of slavery in Europe and Africa; the development of the Atlantic trade; the economic, social, political, and religious effects of the slave trade in Africa and the Americas; the rise of racism; abolition and its aftermath.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 215
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ETST 221: Europe in the Age of Nationalism, World War, and Totalitarianism, 1851-1990

An examination of European history from the Age of National Unification through the collapse of the Soviet Empire. Topics include imperialism, the two World Wars, the Russian Revolution, fascism, totalitarianism, mass nationalism, and the reemergence of eastern and central Europe.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 275
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ETST 222: History of the American West

This course examines realities and images of the frontier/western experience from exploration and settlement of North America through the present. Included are native and immigrant groups, technology, transportation, agriculture, mining, and urbanization, as well as effects of the frontier on national character.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 330
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 223: Nationalism in Modern History

An examination of the idea and the reality of nationalism in modern history. Among the questions we will ask are: Is nationalism a modern phenomenon, or does it have pre-modern origins? Is it compatible with democracy and human rights or fundamentally hostile to them? Is it primarily a European phenomenon transplanted to other places, or are there indigenous roots of nationalism throughout the world? We will attempt to answer these questions by reading theoretical works on nationalism from a variety of disciplines and by examining historical case studies.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 295
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ETST 224: Introduction to Judaism: Canon, Thought, Practice

The oldest monotheistic religion, studied through its classic texts (including the Bible, Talmud, Maimonides, the Zohar and much more). Readings of the modern era will highlight the shift from a religion to a national/ethnic identity. In addition, key terms of the Jewish cycle of life will be introduced.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 225

ETST 226: Identity Politics and Ethnic Conflict

Are conflicts between identity groups inevitable? Why do outbreaks of violence and ethnic conflict occur when they do? How have governments dealt with diversity and with what consequences? Students will read both new and classic works from the literature on nationalism, identity politics, genocide and post-conflict resolution across the world.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Government 226
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ETST 272: Social Psychology of Prejudice

This course explores social psychology through the lens of research and theory on prejudice and discrimination. What are prejudice's causes, consequences, and cures? We will examine theories related to personality, emotion, cognition, and perception that help to explain generalized and specific prejudices (e.g., sexism/heterosexism, racism, ethnocentrism, anti-Semitism). Students will be assessed through exams and papers. Intended as an alternative to PSYC 270.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 272
Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or sophomore standing

ETST 280: Survey of Postcolonial Literature

An introduction to major postcolonial works in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Readings include novels by African, Asian, and Caribbean authors such as Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, and Jean Rhys.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 280
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or consent of instructor

ETST 290: African-American Art

Beginning with the late eighteenth century and concluding with art today, this course examines African-American history through visual culture. We will examine how race relations in the United States were and are constructed through an examination of painting, sculpture, public monuments, photography, advertising, and performance.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 272
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 300: Strong Nations: Perspectives of Contemporary Native American Women

An interdisciplinary examination of issues facing Native American women today. This course explores the ways gender, race and ethnicity shape identity as well as narrative constructions of nation in regional contexts. Readings by contemporary indigenous women authors, with field trips to federally recognized tribal lands and discussion with Native American women leaders, activists, scholars, musicians, artists and business leaders from a variety of nations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 320

ETST 301: Theories of Race and Ethnicity

This seminar examines and critiques prominent theories/theorists of race and ethnicity. We review the origins of the concept of race and discuss both the biological myth and social reality of race. We survey primordialist, constructivist, assimilationist, and conflict theories of race and ethnicity; structural, intersectional, culturalist and critical approaches; and the re-emergence of biological theories of race in the genomic age.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ETST 302: Research Methods in Ethnic Studies

An introduction to a variety of methodological ways of investigating our social world. We focus on applied (or public) ways of conducting research that explicitly inform social policy, programs, and practice on issues related to race and ethnicity. We work in collaborative research environments, understanding how research can be conducted both for the sake of research and to improve the lives of people.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a course in ethnic studies; ETST 110 recommended

ETST 310: Topics in Ethnic Studies

An explanation of a particular topic in ethnic studies. Topics may pertain to an issue or debate, a specific ethno-racial community, a geographic area, or a historical time period. The specific topic investigated changes each year or varies by term. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2019: Social Justice and Critical Geography
This course examines the spatial dimensions of various systems of social injustice including racism, sexism, and economic inequality. We examine how space (physical, imagined, or otherwise) structures our social world. How markers of race, class, sexuality, gender, and nationality intersect in our bodies, lives, emotions, and physical environment. We situate our analysis in economic processes such as productive and reproductive labor, migration, displacement, and gentrification.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 315: Introduction to the Art Museum: History, Issues, and Practices

Introduction to art museums and exhibitions as objects of critical inquiry, and to issues and practices in the art museum field. Topics will include: history and evolution of collecting and display; museum exhibitions and knowledge formation; collection practices and ethics; exhibition theory and design; controversies, institutional critique, and the artist-as-curator.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 315
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 318: Race and Religion

This course examines how religious cultures and discourses contributed to the emergence of the concept of race, racial classification, and processes of 'racialization'; how biblical interpretation both justified and contested the transatlantic slave trade; and how anti-Black racism relates to anti-Semitism. The course examines the history of doctrines on indigenous peoples, race science, and exploitation, and the dynamics of race and ethnicity in Israel and Palestine. Lecture/discussion with final paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 381
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 320: Empire and Nation in Russian History

The course examines the history of ethnically diverse territories referred to as “Russia” from early modern times to 1991. Themes include the formation of the Russian empire, its transformation into the Soviet Union, and its partial collapse in 1991; the meaning of “empire,” “nation,” and “ethnicity”in historical context; and the interaction of Russians with non-Russian peoples in Ukraine, the Baltic States, Central Asia, and the Caucasus.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 315
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor; HIST 320 or 325 recommended

ETST 325: Ethnicity in Latin America

Explores the coming together of distinct Native, African, and European ethnicities in Latin America, and the resulting creation of new ethnicities. We examine how race has been understood in Latin American history and how attitudes toward race have fundamentally shaped the history of the region.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 378
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; HIST 178 or HIST 179 recommended

ETST 330: Indians of North America

A cultural study of the Indians of North America, including examination of the impact of European ideas and technology on Indian societies. Emphasis on environmental adaptations, levels of social and cultural complexity, problems of historical interpretation, and the methods and theories of ethnology and their applications to North American cultures.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 350
Prerequisite: ANTH 110

ETST 332: Ethnography of the Middle East and North Africa

Introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa, an area of tremendous cultural, religious, linguistic, and economic diversity. Focus on the nature of ethnography as a research method and key areas of inquiry that have concerned anthropologists working in Arab and Muslim societies. Topics include social organization, tribalism, colonialism, gender, religion, nationalism, ethnic and religious minorities, and the politics of identity.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 358
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor

ETST 335: Anthropology of South Asia

Introduces the complexity of South Asian society and culture through the study of ethnographies of gender, religious life, kinship, social organization, and economy in the colonial and post-colonial periods.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 360
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or consent of instructor

ETST 336: Decolonization, Activism and Hope: Changing the Way We See Native America

This course explores the damaging effects of colonization and colonial patterns of representation on Native American people throughout history. It calls on students to produce creative interdisciplinary projects that engage with the community and offer more accurate, better-informed representations of Native American culture in the United States. Seminar/studio with readings by significant Native American authors and field trips to federally recognized tribal lands.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ETST 340: Sociology of Education

An examination of the social foundations of education in the United States with particular attention paid to the cultural, political, and economic functions of education in modern society. Other topics include the reproductive function of schooling in a society divided along lines of race/ethnicity and class, schools as sites of cultural production, and the historical tension in the U.S. between “equality” and “excellence” in education. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Education Studies 440
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 341: Human Variation

A survey of human biological variation and adaptation. Topics include the geographic distribution of human variation; evolutionary approaches to understanding human diversity; historic and modern concepts of race and ethnicity; human biological adaptations to disease, climate, poverty, and other stressors; and the genetics of simple and complex traits.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 341
Prerequisite: ANTH 140, BIOL 110, or consent of instructor

ETST 346: Indigenous Music & Art: Identity, Loss and Healing

An interdisciplinary examination of contemporary music and art from varous Indigenous communities of North and South America. this course explores the ways the traditional arts help shape cultural identity and provide an outward expression for loss and healing. All course readings and performances are by contemporary indigenous authors, artists and musicians. Weekly written work, discussion and a multimedia project
Units: 6.

ETST 352: Ethnicity, Cultural Diversity, and Education

A study of the experience of children and adolescents from different ethnic, cultural, and economic groups. Emphasis on understanding the social consequences of these differences and how such differences affect educational achievement and attainment. The sources and educational effects of individual, institutional, and systemic racism, sexism, and other forms of prejudice and discrimination will also be examined. Practicum of 20 hours required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Education Studies 350
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 360: African American Writers

A survey of African American literature from slave narratives through contemporary literature. Readings include works by Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, and Toni Morrison.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 260
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent or sophomore standing

ETST 365: Black and Latin@ Sociology

Through lecture and discussion, this course compares and contrasts the diverse experiences of Blacks and Latin@ in the United States. Some topics include historical background, racial and ethnic formation, systemic racism, discrimination immigration, racial/class/gender and sexuality intersections, language discrimination and group conflict and cooperation. Students will review critically important literature, do weekly assignments and submit a final project.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ETST 370: Sociology of the U.S./Mexican Border

This lecture and discussion course introduces sociological understandings of the U.S./Mexico border. More than a geographical divide, the border has a power and a force that structures and patterns human behavior, identity, and belonging for people who live near it, cross it, locate it in their memory, and see its effects on their family and friends. Students test understandings through presentations, exams and final projects.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ETST 382: Migrants and German Culture

Despite a long-term refusal to open itself to immigration, Germany has become a nation of immigrants and asylum-seekers. The course focuses on how both literature and films, including works by and about minorities in Germany, have dealt with key cultural phenomena: multiculturalism, diversity, acculturation, assimilation, “majority culture,” and parallel societies.
Units: 6.
Also listed as German 447, Film Studies 447
Prerequisite: GER 312 or consent of the instructor

ETST 390: Tutorial in Ethnic Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ETST 391: Directed Study in Ethnic Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ETST 395: Internship in Ethnic Studies

Practical experience working with diverse population, focused on volunteer, policy, or advocacy work. For example, students might volunteer to tutor youth in ethnically diverse educational programs, or work with a local immigrant relocation agency. Students work for 5-10 hours a week, depending on the amount of credit being earned, meet periodically with the instructor, and submit a written reflection connecting the experience to their academic work in Ethnic Studies. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

ETST 399: Independent Study in Ethnic Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ETST 400: Sociology Of Latinx Americans

The course provides students with a broad knowledge about Latina/os frequently omitted from the common curriculum, centered in the experiences of Latina/os. Topics include race/ethnicity, gender, politics, religion, education, labor, immigration, and major historical events like the Chicano and Puerto Rican civil rights movements and the social and demographic chracteristics of Latina/os. Reading quizzes, exam, and project.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 401: Sociology of Black Americans

This course examines sociological perspectives as they pertain to Black Americans. we will explore the nexus between historical and contemporary situations of African Americans in the United States in an attempt to unearth the various ways in which these strands of thought intersect at both individual and institutional levels. Readings, group projects, final exam and project.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 407: Spanish in the U.S.

A first approach to the study of Spanish in the United States through different lenses, including (but not limited to) the history of Spanish and its speakers in the U.S., a demographic overview of its varieties, sociopolitical factors surrounding its use, linguistic phenomena resulting from contact with English, and educational approaches to learning Spanish as a heritage language. Written assignments and exams.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 407, Linguistics 407
Prerequisite: 300-level course in Spanish or consent of instructor

ETST 410: Advanced Topics in Ethnic Studies

An in-depth investigation of a particular topic in Ethnic Studies. Topics may pertain to an issue or debate, a specific ethno-racial community, a geographic area, or a historical time period. The specific topic investigated changes each year or varies by term. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ETST 200 or ETST 210, or consent of instructor

ETST 415: Africa in the European Imagination

This advanced seminar examines the conceptualization of Africa and Africans in modern European intellectual history. The course details how European thinkers explored issues of race and identity through their figurative and physical engagement with the African continent. Topics include travel narratives, the philosophy of slavery and abolition, and imperialism. (G & C)
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 415
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 420: The American Civil War

A comprehensive examination of the Civil War era between 1840 and 1877. Major themes and topics will include the political crisis leading to secession, the military conduct of the war, the end of slavery, the effects of the war on American society, and Reconstruction.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 470
Prerequisite: Junior standing and HIST 131, or consent of instructor

ETST 425: Black, Brown, and Queer on Film: Race, Gender, and Sexuality on Film

Visual culture has long defined that which is not white, not queer, and not male as deviant from the visual norm. This course will explore the way in which film culture has traditionally positioned people it defines as deviant from the racial, ethnic, gender or sexual norm and the ways in which filmmakers have responded to that positioning.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 325, Gender Studies 325
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

ETST 471: Performing Arts of Bali

This course explores the intersections of Balinese music, dance, drama, and ritual. Discussions will include how globalization, tourism, and economic and religious tensions affect the arts and performer’s lives. Students will have hands-on experience learning to play Balinese gamelan instruments.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Musicology 471
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

ETST 478: Nineteenth-Century African-American Writers

This lecture/discussion class will explore the rich literature African-American authors created, against great adversity, in nineteenth-century America. We will read works by Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Charlotte Forten Grimke, Paul Laurence Dunbar and others. Students will write short weekly papers and a substantial final research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 478
Prerequisite: ENG 250, ENG 260, or junior standing; or consent of instructor

ETST 504: Multiethnic American Literature

A study of selected works reflecting the ethnic and cultural diversity of American literature, with primary attention to minority voices and experiences. Selected texts will center on a specific theme such as hybridity, migration, or belonging. Works are taught in their literary, historical, and cultural context, critical readings will also be incorporated. Students will complete several short writing assignments and a researched term paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 504
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or the equivalent

ETST 506: Contemporary African-American Women Poets

In this lecture/discussion course, we'll look at the great stylistic variety of poetry that Black women have been writing during the past twenty years. Students will consider poetry through the lenses of critical race and gender criticism and will write weekly short papers and a substantial research paper. Poets may include Marilyn Nelson, Natasha Trethewey, Claudia Rankine, Tracy K. Smith, Nikky Finney and others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 506, Gender Studies 506
Prerequisite: ENG 250, ENG 260, or junior standing; or consent of instructor

ETST 512: Fictions of Africa

An exploration of African culture and history through literature and film by African authors/directors. Issues to be explored include African debates on colonialism, post-colonialism, gender, class, and ethnic stratification, religion, modernization and development. Fictional works will be discussed in tandem with ethnographic monographs and critical essays.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 512
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and at least two other courses in the social sciences

ETST 514: Reading the Border: Gender, Texts and Performance

This course will focus on textual and cultural (re)presentations—including narratives, performance, film, photography and genre-defying texts—of the Central American-Mexio-U.S. borders, where spaces, race, violence and ethnicity become gendered. The course will cover the mid-1980s until contemporary times, a period tempered by the events of 9/11, as well as more recent political discourses focused on the border. Seminar with papers and a final project.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 514
Prerequisite: SPAN 300-level course or equivalent official placement

ETST 515: Ruining the Imaginary of Paradise: Eco-Criticism in the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean

This seminar examines the history and cultural expressions of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean--both the insular and the continental areas--from an eco-critical perspective. Parting from the so-called discovery, conquest and colonization and moving thorugh slavery, independence and postcolonial movements, the course provides an account of the exploitative processes of imperial powers that have imagined the Caribbean as a tropical paradise. Lecture/discussion with papers.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 515
Prerequisite: 400-level course in Spanish or consent of instructor

ETST 516: Literature and Human Rights

An interdisciplinary investigation of the aesthetics and ethics of representing human rights and their violations in literature and film. Texts include novels, plays, essays, and films on topics such as genocide, torture, and development.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 516
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 280, or consent of instructor

ETST 518: Narratives of Inequality

Is globalization really shrinking the global divide between rich and poor, or is this mere fiction? To explore this question, we will examine contemporary novels and films that showcase individuals in India and China as they grapple with issues such as economic migration, class struggle, and terrorism.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 518
Prerequisite: ENG 280, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ETST 521: Narratives of International News

A study of the literature that re-presents world events in different ways from the mainstream news media. Texts include novels, memoirs, graphic novels, or documentary dramas.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 521
Prerequisite: ENG 280, junior standing, or consent of instructor

ETST 561: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance

A study of poetry, fiction, and essays by African American writers from the era of World War I through the 1930s. Authors include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Nella Larsen, W.E.B. Du Bois, and others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 510
Prerequisite: Junior standing, ENG 250 or 260, or consent of instructor

ETST 583: Latin@ Studies (in English)

This course covers the main cultural issues in Latin@ communities. It concentrates on the Latin@s of the United States, the definitions of these communities, and their cultural expressions. Through theoretical materials as well as literature, film, historical documents, testimony, etc., this course addresses a variety of subjects related to Latin@ culture. Taught in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 466
Prerequisite: One 300-level Spanish course, its equivalent, or consent of instructor

ETST 584: Black Cultural Nationalisms

A study of the variations of black cultural nationalisms in the works of francophone writers from Africa and the Diaspora. This course examines the writers, challenge to the “Négritude” school and the ways in which they articulate plural and locational black identities to affirm their unique sense of national belonging. Readings from authors such as Senghor, Cé’saire, Laye, Condé’, Chamoiseau, Contant, and Glissant.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 588
Prerequisite: One 400-level French course or consent of instructor

ETST 590: Tutorial in Ethnic Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ETST 591: Directed Study in Ethnic Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ETST 595: Internship in Ethnic Studies

Practical experience working with diverse population, focused on volunteer, policy, or advocacy work. For example, students might volunteer to tutor youth in ethnically diverse educational programs, or work with a local immigrant relocation agency. Students work for 5-10 hours a week, depending on the amount of credit being earned, meet periodically with the instructor, and submit a written reflection connecting the experience to their academic work in Ethnic Studies. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

ETST 599: Independent Study in Ethnic Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ETST 600: Senior Seminar

Seniors confer with the instructor during winter and spring term of their junior year to select specific topics related to a shared theme. At the start of the seminar, students read and discuss shared texts as they prusue individual projects on race and ethncity that reflect their own topical, theoretical, and methodological interests.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: ETST 110 and ETST 302

ETST 690: Tutorial in Ethnic Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ETST 691: Directed Study in Ethnic Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

ETST 695: Internship in Ethnic Studies

Practical experience working with diverse population, focused on volunteer, policy, or advocacy work. For example, students might volunteer to tutor youth in ethnically diverse educational programs, or work with a local immigrant relocation agency. Students work for 5-10 hours a week, depending on the amount of credit being earned, meet periodically with the instructor, and submit a written reflection connecting the experience to their academic work in Ethnic Studies. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

ETST 699: Independent Study in Ethnic Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Film Studies

Professors:P. Cohen (Patricia Hamar Boldt Professor of Liberal Studies History), G. Fares (Spanish) (on leave term(s) I), B. Peterson (German), C. Skran (Edwin & Ruth West Professor of Economics and Social Science Government), R. Tapia (Spanish), T. Troy (J. Thomas and Julie E. Hurvis Professor of Theatre and Drama Theatre Arts)
Visiting professor:L. Baybrook (Film Studies Program)
Associate professors:E. Carlson (Art and Art History), A. Guenther-Pal (German), J. McQuinn (Conservatory of Music), A. Ongiri (Jill Beck Director of Film Studies Professorship Film Studies Program, chair), J. Shimon (Art and Art History), T. Spurgin (Bonnie Glidden Buchanan Professor of English Literature English)
Assistant professor:A. Haydock (Film Studies Program)

Film Studies involves the study of visual culture in all its formats and platforms as culturally vital art forms and artifacts. Film Studies students will be involved in the theory, praxis, and history of film and video. Students are also involved in the production of video, film, and animation in the Hurvis Film Studies Center, a new state-of-the-art production facility. Film and video has its own identifiable properties and conventions, consequently Film Studies courses expose students to the theory and criticism of moving images in order to explore the technical, stylistic, and rhetorical devices that films employ to create and convey meaning. The courses listed below pay particular attention to the history, analysis, and interpretation of film and video as key forms of contemporary culture. Film Studies invites interdisciplinary approaches. Film Studies course offerings at Lawrence University are drawn from various language departments: Chinese, English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish; there are also film courses in the departments of Anthropology, Art and Art History, History, and Theatre Arts and in the Conservatory of Music. Students taking courses in film studies have access to a wide range of interpretive methodologies, national cinemas, film styles, and genres and may combine their interest in film with the majority of disciplines in the liberal arts.

Required for the interdisciplinary area in film studies

  1. Completion of five courses selected from the film studies course list in which film comprises at least 25 percent of the course material and grading. FIST 100: Introduction to Film Studies, or its equivalent (FREN 302, GER 277, SPAN 330), is required.
  2. Students who wish to complete the IA during the current academic year should notify a faculty advisor by the first Friday of Term III. Students will then be expected to present a coherent statement of how the courses selected fit together.

Courses - Film Studies

FIST 100: Introduction to Film Studies

An introduction to both cinema studies and film/video production, this course will provide an overview of historical, analytical, and theoretical approaches to cinema and introduce a broad range of basic production skills including the fundamentals of nonlinear editing. Through hands-on work and the study of a diverse selection of films rooted in different cultures, times, and ideologies, students will begin to develop the critical means for engaging with cinema and culture in discussion, writing, and creative work.
Units: 6.

FIST 110: Interdisciplinary Video

Designed primarily for students interested in incorporating video into their current or future work in other academic and creative disciplines. This course offers a practical introduction to basic editing, camera, and sound techniques, paired with a general study of multiple methodologies and current debates in representational ethics.
Units: 6.

FIST 120: Image and Sound I

A basic introduction to the fundamental forms, concepts, terminology, and techniques of filmmaking, contextualized within a critical/historical framework. Students explore multiple approaches to creating meaning through readings, screenings, lectures, discussions, and critiques, paired with video exercises and hands-on instruction.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 120

FIST 191: Directed Study in Film Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 210: Film History I

A foundation course on the history of cinema in a global and transnational context, Film History I focuses on "silent" film (early film to the present day) and the transition to sound. Topics include creative and technological practices; national cinemas in context; narrative, documentary, and experimental modes.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 211: Film History II

A foundations course on the history of cinema in a global and transnational context, Film History II focuses on the sound era. Topics include creative and technological practices; studio, avant-garde, and postcolonial cinemas; independent, contemporary, and digital film; narrative, documentary, and experimental modes.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 212: Writer vs. Director: The Battle Between Literature & Film

This course examines questions of identity, gender, nationality, civic duty, scientific inquiry, and/or historical progress from the perspectives of two complimentary—but also competing—media. Through scene analysis, students will learn to identify the distinctive marks of literary vs. cinematic form, evaluate the formal choices that writers and directors make, and apply the achievements of literary and cinematic art to shared ethical and existential concerns.
Units: 6.

FIST 220: Image and Sound II

A continuation of FIST 120 with expanded instruction in image design, sound design, sequencing, and concept development. Historical development of the medium and contemporary approaches to creative expression, representational ethics, and audience are emphasized through exercises, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and critiques, culminating in a final video project.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 223
Prerequisite: FIST 120 or consent of instructor

FIST 222: Sound Design

An introduction to film sound studies paired with hands-on exploration of cinematic audio recording and editing techniques, with emphasis on sound/image relationships and the use of sound to create meaning. Students will engage in close readings of critical and theoretical texts, view and discuss film screenings, and produce a series of short audio and video exercises, culminating in a final video project showcasing the creative use of film sound.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 224
Prerequisite: FIST 120 or consent of instructor

FIST 240: New Media in Art

An introduction to new media within a fine art context. Digital photography, experimental video, sound, photo book design, and blogging are covered as students use the Internet as a venue for presenting projects. The evolution of technology, new media theory, contemporary art discourse, and visual culture are examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 240
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110

FIST 245: Interarts: New Media Projects

A class where students make projects that engage the outside world via digital media. Lectures, discussions, readings, and critiques will investigate contemporary interdisciplinary practices and the nature of creativity. Students will be taught the basics of design thinking, leading to conceptual-development, planning, and production. Students work individually or collaboratively on documentary, video, performance, installation, graphic novels, podcasts and web projects. Mac-based.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 245
Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110, or consent of instructor

FIST 277: Introduction to German Film Studies

With its pivotal role in the inauguration of the cinema, knowledge of German film is critical to any understanding of the history of film. This course is intended to be an introduction both to German cinema and to the discipline of film studies. Considered perhaps as one of the most accessible aesthetic forms, the moving image pervades our everyday lives and yet we seldom think of what we do in the movie theatre as “reading.” Throughout this course, students will be introduced to the practice of reading the filmic text using three structuring lenses: 1) history, 2) formal and generic elements, and 3) film criticism.
Units: 6.
Also listed as German 377
Prerequisite: GER 312

FIST 278: Introduction to German Film (in English)

With its pivotal role in the inauguration of the cinema, knowledge of German film is critical to an understanding of the history of film. Considered as one of the most accessible aesthetic forms, the moving image pervades our everyday lives, and yet we seldom think of what we do as "reading" films. Throughout this course, students will be introduced to the practice of reading German films using three structuring lenses: 1) film and cultural history, 2) formal and generic elements, and 3) film criticism.
Units: 6.
Also listed as German 278

FIST 287: Russian Through Film

This course will examine topics in Russian film. Topics may include specific generes (e.g., the sad comedy), the work of a director or tradition, films important for a specific historical moment (e.g., The Thaw or World War Two), or films devoted to a specific theme. Students will expand their Russian vocabulary, improve fluency, increase speaking confidence and gain cultural knowledge by viewing Russian films and analyzing the psychology of the characters. Throughout this course, students will be introduced to the practice of reading the filmic text using three structuring lenses: 1) history, 2) formal and generic elements, and 3) film criticism. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Fall 2018: The World of Children
In this course, we will be exploring the culture of Russian children. We will read poetry and short fiction for children, we will watch cartoons and films, and we will learn to play some children’s games. This course is also intended to provide the students with a comprehensive review of major grammatical topics and vocabulary covered in second-year Russian. More advanced students will be given additional readings and assignments. In Russian.
Topic for Spring 2019: Russian Folk and Fairy Tales in Film
This course will introduce advanced students of Russian to the rich tradition of Russian folk tales and their representation in film. Students will read tales about such all-time favorite characters as Kolobok, Yemelia and his Pike, Baba-Yaga, Kashchei the Deathless, Vasilissa the Beautiful, etc. We will then explore the cinematic presentations and re-interpretations of these tales and characters in Soviet and post-Soviet films and cartoons. Students will write their own fairy tales; as a final group project, students will shoot a fairy-tale film. In Russian.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Russian 287
Prerequisite: RUSS 250 or consent of instructor

FIST 300: Reel Men: Masculinity in American Film, 1945-2000

Focusing on an array of well-known American films — “The Maltese Falcon,” “Red River,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “McCabe and Mrs. Miller,” “Chinatown,” “Die Hard,” and “American Beauty” among them — the course will integrate film theory, gender theory, and American history to address the problem of how masculinity has been constructed in American culture since World War II. Not open to students who have previously received, or need to receive, credit for HIST 400.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 300, Gender Studies 323
Prerequisite: Sophomore level or above

FIST 302: Cinematically Speaking

French films function as a springboard for readings, discussions, oral presentations, and short critical essays. We will briefly examine the history of French film from 1940 to the present, study cinematic techniques, the vocabulary of cinema, and explore the principal themes.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 302
Prerequisite: FREN 202 or consent of instructor

FIST 305: Film as History and History as Film

An examination, through selected films, of specific moments in European history and an examination of film itself as a source of historical interpretation. Possible “historical moments” include Medieval England, Nazi Germany, and the Holocaust, and possible films include Becket, The Triumph of the Will, and Schindler’s List.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 305
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

FIST 309: Hollywood Goes to High School

Year after year, Hollywood turns out movies that are set in schools and present images of teachers and teens. Many of these films address typical coming-of-age issues, societal fear of teen crime and delinquency and, of course, the search for romance. A subset of these films provide powerful and culturally enduring images of teachers and teaching. High school movies also provide insight into the fantasies, anxieties, dreams, and assumptions prevalent in American culture. This course will examine the world and worldview found in Hollywood high school movies and the extent to which the stories they tell make us who we are.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Education Studies 309
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

FIST 318: Topics in Filmmaking

This course allows for an in-depth examination of various aspects of filmmaking, with a dual focus on close reading of related film studies texts and practical exploration of advanced techniques, culminating in a final video project.

Topic for Fall 2018: Photomotion
Photomotion is a hands-on darkroom class exploring strategies for conveying movement using light-sensitive materials. The history, theory, and practice of these techniques, within the continuums of both fine art and cinema, will be addressed.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 125
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 319: Principles of Editing

A theoretical and practical introduction to connecting images and sound in a compelling way. The goal is to promote understanding of film, video, and new media as tools for creative expression and to help students think critically and make informed choices about editing.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 319
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 320: Topics in Russian Film (in English)

This course explores facets of the development of Russian film in its historical and cultural context. Topics may include: “The Golden Age of Soviet Film,” “The Cinema of Tarkovsky,” and “Film as Propaganda.” Taught in English. Russian majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in Russian.

Topic for Winter 2019: Tarkovsky and Soviet Culture
This class will explore the feature films and theoretical writings of Andrei Tarkovsky against the background of late Soviet culture. Discussion and readings will address the historical context of Tarkovsky's work; his cinematic, poetic, and narrative techniques; and his philosophical aspirations as a Soviet--and therefore global--filmmaker. Students will do frequent short writing assignments. In English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Russian 320

FIST 324: Gender and Cinema

This course examines gender and film in an international context. Topics include the construction of femininity and masculinity in film, feminist and queer film theories, analysis of film using intersectional and formal approaches, women behind the camera, and gender and genre.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 324
Prerequisite: FIST 100, GEST 100, the equivalent, or consent of instructor

FIST 325: Black, Brown, and Queer on Film: Race, Gender, and Sexuality on Film

Visual culture has long defined that which is not white, not queer, and not male as deviant from the visual norm. This course will explore the way in which film culture has traditionally positioned people it defines as deviant from the racial, ethnic, gender or sexual norm and the ways in which filmmakers have responded to that positioning.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 425, Gender Studies 325
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

FIST 330: Introduction to Film

An introduction to the critical analysis of Latin American and Spanish film. Selected films represent various countries, genres and directors from Latin America and Spain. Readings of relevant film theory, class discussions and composition tasks prepare students for other advanced courses in the Spanish program.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 430, Theatre Arts 352
Prerequisite: SPAN 202, its equivalent, or consent of instructor; not open to native speakers of Spanish.

FIST 340: Intermediate New Media in Art

A continuation of Art 240 or 245 using new media within a contemporary art context. Digital photography, experimental video, social media, performance, and installation are covered while using the Internet and campus spaces as venues for projects. Contemporary art discourse is examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 340
Prerequisite: ART 240 or ART 245

FIST 345: Screenwriting

An exploration of the plot, character, and theme in the work of short films and scripts followed by the creation of one or more short screenplays.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 350: Modern Chinese Literature and Cinema in Translation

A survey of 20th-century Chinese fiction and cinema. Iconoclastic works of modern Chinese vernacular fiction from 1919 through the post-Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) will be juxtaposed alongside films dealing with the same period, such as Red Sorghum (1987) and Farewell, My Concubine (1992) made by the so-called Fifth Generation of film directors (born after 1949, when the People’s Republic was founded). Class conducted in English. No knowledge of Chinese required.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 350, East Asian Studies 350
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; EAST 150 recommended

FIST 354: History of Russian and Soviet Film

This course will introduce the student to the rich and varied tradition of Russian and Soviet cinema from the Pre-Revolutionary period to the present. Works by major filmmakers will be viewed and discussed in the context of the culture, economy, society, and politics of the time. Taught in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Russian 354, History 354
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

FIST 357: Film in Germany (In English)

This course selects from 90 years of filmmaking in Germany. Films range from expressionism to Nazi propaganda and from escapist comedies to avant garde art. Learning to “read” German films critically also means finding out how to understand movies from Hollywood and beyond. Possible topics include “From Caligari to Hitler,” “German Literature as Film,” and “What Makes Lola Run.” Taught in English. German majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in German.

Topic for Spring 2019: Fatih Akin, a Retrospective
Now that he has produced a dozen films, including In the Fade which won the Golden Globe for best foreign film in 2018, it is time to take a retrospective look at Fatih Akin’s impressive body of work. Why do so many consider him to be Germany’s most important living filmmaker? What themes does he address? Do his films have a recognizable style? What can we learn from viewing his wide ranging collection of films?
Units: 6.
Also listed as German 357, Theatre Arts 351

FIST 360: Chinese Contemporary Film in English

Using feature films and documentaries from the so-called Fifth [1982-] and Sixth Generations [beginning in the 1990s] of film directors in China, this course provides a visual record of the immense political, economic, and social changes in China since the Reform and Opening up period at the end of the Cultural Revolution. Taught in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 360, East Asian Studies 360
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; EAST 150 or EAST 420 recommended

FIST 362: Vampires, Monsters, and Man-Eaters

This course examines the borders of the human through the figures of the vampire, monster, and femme fatale in literature, film, and the visual arts. Featured in the works of canonized authors as well as within popular culture, “monstrousness” can provide valuable insights into numerous aspects of German history and psychosexual relations. Possible texts include the early vampire film Nosferatu, Wedekind’s Lulu tragedies, Patrick Süskind’s Das Parfüm, and paintings by H.R. Giger.
Units: 6.
Also listed as German 462, Gender Studies 362
Prerequisite: GER 312

FIST 370: Avant-Doc

An exploration of personal, experimental, and emerging approaches to documentary filmmaking through video projects, readings, screenings, lecture, discussion, and critique. This course examines both contemporary practice and historical intersections among filmmaking traditions, with a focus on engaging with critical dialogues and diverse ways of articulating relationships between maker, subject, and audience.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 372
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 371: Documentary Forms

This course presents a broad overview of contemporary and historical documentary filmmaking practice through readings, screenings, discussion, and short video projects. Students will engage with critical dialogues and explore several distinct approaches to documentary production, including rhetorical, observational, participatory, and reflexive forms, culminating in a completed short documentary.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 371
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 380: Artisanal Animation

This course explores the history and contemporary practice of artisanal and experimental animation through hands-on workshops, film and video animation projects, readings, screenings, discussion, and critique. Topics include significant artists and movements, fundamental animation principles, optical toys, direct 16mm animation, rotoscoping, sound design for animation, 2D computer animation using Photoshop, and several stop-motion techniues using animation stands and Dragonframe software. Not open to students who have earned credit for the FIST 318 topic Artisanal Animation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 390: Tutorial in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 391: Directed Study in Film Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 399: Independent Study in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 400: Reel Men: Masculinity in American Film, 1945-2000

At the upper level, the course will serve as a history seminar in preparation for the history department's capstone course. Those taking it at that level will be required to write at least one paper addressing film or gender theory and to write a 10-15 page research prospectus. Not open to students who have previously received credit for HIST 300.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 400, Gender Studies 423
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above

FIST 402: Film Theory and Criticism

What is the language of film? What is the relationship between spectator and screen? What is the role of film as mass and global phenomena? This course explores basic issues in film theory and criticism that may include auteur theory, genre criticism, apparatus theory, stardom, feminist and queer film theories.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One of FIST 100, FREN 302, FREN 411, GER 177, GER 277, GER 357, GER 411, or SPAN 330; or consent of instructor

FIST 411: Fascism and Film

This course in French must be taken in conjunction with GER 411, taught in English. It will expand on the films made in France by Continental under the Nazi Occupation, 1940-1944. Concurrent registration in GER 411 is required.
Units: 2.
Also listed as French 411
Prerequisite: One course in French at the 300 level or consent of instructor

FIST 412: Fascism and Film (In English)

This course lets students examine films that were ostensibly made as entertainment or explicitly crafted as propaganda in the historical context of Nazi Germany and occupied France. Aside from learning how governments and their cinematic agents used this relatively new medium to shape public opinion (in support of the war, against Jews, etc.) students will see where and how resistance was possible.
Units: 6.
Also listed as German 411

FIST 418: Topics in Film Studies

Topics in Film Studies allows for an in depth examination of topics across time, for example, the work of women directors, or it permits a detailed analysis of special topics, for example, Turkish-German or Central European film.
Units: 6.

FIST 420: Topics in Film Genre

This topics course allows for an in-depth examination of film genre in various historical, national, theoretical, and aesthetic contexts. Course under this heading may focus on a single genre (for example, the musical) or be comparative. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Winter 2019: Queering Sci Fi Film
The genre of sci fi film is one of the most malleable and resilient of all film genres. In this course, we'll examine the ways in which traditionally marginalized filmmakers employ the sci fi genre to think about difference, marginalization, and futurity. We will explore contemporary films by marginalized directors such as A Wrinkle in Time and The Shape of Water, in addition to classic films such as Metropolis and Blade Runner. Use/think about the boundaries of genre.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 421: Editing the Manuscript: Studies in Film Criticism and Publication

An introduction to the hidden side of critical writing, where an editor's decisions and revisions define a field. As assistant editors to an active peer-reviewed journal, students will master the critical skills—from grammar, logic, and style to organization, sense of audience, and collaborative management—that shape Film Studies as both a professional market and an intellectual culture.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Freshman Studies

FIST 422: Borrowed Music in the Movies

When a film uses a pre-existing piece of music (popular or classical), meanings multiply, both within and outside the film itself. This course will explore these meanings, focusing on the fluid and reciprocal relationship between film and the music it borrows.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Musicology 422
Prerequisite: MUCO 202

FIST 447: Migrants and German Culture

Despite a long-term refusal to open itself to immigration, Germany has become a nation of immigrants and asylum-seekers. The course focuses on how both literature and films, including works by and about minorities in Germany, have dealt with key cultural phenomena: multiculturalism, diversity, acculturation, assimilation, “majority culture,” and parallel societies.
Units: 6.
Also listed as German 447, Ethnic Studies 382
Prerequisite: GER 312 or consent of the instructor

FIST 460: Topics in Community-Engaged Film Production

This course will explore the role of documentary video in public life, the way in which new digital media are reshaping communities and civic engagement, and the potential of video as a creative medium of participatory democracy.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FIST 100 or consent of instructor

FIST 464: Francophone Literature and Screen Adaptations

Focusing on the works of writers and filmmakers such as Sembene Ousmane, Joseph Zobel, Aimé Césaire, D.T. Niane, Dani Kouyate, Euzhan Palcy and Raoul Peck the course examines the interface between the literary and filmic media in raising consciousness about societal challenges, nationhood, power and identity. It also analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of each medium in accomplishing these objectives.
Units: 6.
Also listed as French 464
Prerequisite: 300-level French course or consent of instructor

FIST 540: Advanced New Media in Art

A continuation of Art 340 using new media at an advanced level. Digital photography, experimental video, social media, performance, and installation are covered while using the Internet and campus spaces as venues for projects. Contemporary art discourse is examined through projects, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Mac-based. When scheduled on Tuesday-Thursday, class will dismiss early for University Convocations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Studio Art 540
Prerequisite: ART 340 and consent of instructor

FIST 580: Dis(re)membering the Nation: Contemporary Film & Fiction of Spain and Latin America

A thematic analysis of film and fiction produced in the late and post-dictatorial context of Spain and several Latin American countries. The course studies the cultural processes of historical memory, collective trauma, oblivion, and questioning of national narratives in selected works from the past four decades. Readings include Manuel Puig's Kiss of the Spider Woman, Ariel Dorfman's Death and the Maiden, and Carmen Martin Gaite's The Back Room, as well as films by Lucrecia Martel, Victor Erice, Pablo Larrain, and Guillermo del Toro, among others.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 580
Prerequisite: One 400-level course in Spanish or consent of instructor

FIST 590: Tutorial in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 591: Directed Study in Film Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 599: Independent Study in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 601: Senior Research Seminar

Intended to serve as a capstone experience for film studies students with a research concentration. The seminar will explore research methodologies related to research in film history and theory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and declared major in film studies

FIST 602: Senior Production Seminar I

The seminar will serve as a critique group for senior film projects and explore practical issues pertinent to contemporary film practice.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and a declared major in film studies

FIST 603: Senior Production Seminar II

The seminar will serve as a critique group for senior film projects and explore practical issues pertinent to contemporary film practice.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: FIST 602, senior standing and declared major in film studies

FIST 690: Tutorial in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 691: Directed Study in Film Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FIST 699: Independent Study in Film Studies

Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

French

Professors:E. Hoft-March (Milwaukee-Downer College and College Endowment Association Professorship French and Francophone Studies) (on leave term(s) I), L. Vetinde (French and Francophone Studies)
Associate professor:D. Chang (Margaret Banta Humleker Professor of French Cultural Studies French and Francophone Studies)
Instructor:A. Galambosh (French and Francophone Studies)

Goals of the beginning and intermediate sequences in French are comprehension of both the oral and written language beyond an elementary level, development of the capacity to express reasonably complicated thought both orally and in writing, and an introduction to French and Francophone literatures and cultures.

At the advanced level, the student is expected to reach competence in use and knowledge of the French language and to become conversant with French and Francophone literatures and cultures. Students will not only familiarize themselves but also engage critically with important intellectual ideas from the French-speaking world as they have evolved across time and space.

From the beginning, French is used extensively, if not totally, in the classroom. Except where specified, all class discussion, essays, and examinations are conducted in French.

Required for the French major

Students complete a French major by taking a minimum of 60 units beyond FREN 202, including 12 to 18 units at the 300 level, at least 12 units at the 400 level, and at least 12 units at the 500 level, plus the Senior Seminar. At least 18 of the 400- or 500-level units must be taken on the Lawrence campus.

French majors will be required to attend at least one Björklunden French language immersion weekend in either their junior or senior year. Participation in the immersion experience will allow department members to evaluate majors’ levels of proficiency in listening and speaking in a free and unstructured linguistic environment. Students who major in French are also required to attend at least six meetings of the French Table; for one of the Tables they will serve as discussion leader.

Finally, all French majors will be required to assemble a portfolio of a selection of their work in the French program. The portfolio is designed to keep a record of progress over the course of a French major’s career in terms of linguistic proficiency, mastery of specific literary and cultural content, and sophistication of ideas.

Portfolios must be submitted by the second week of Term III of the student’s senior or super-senior year. The French and Francophone Studies department will receive and approve only completed portfolios, and the portfolio submissions must be in PDF format.

The French portfolio must include:

  1. A list of all courses taken for the major
  2. A list of works included in the portfolio
    1. A two to three page essay in French that captures the concept of “la francophonie” through discussion of one aspect of cultural production (cinema, literature, media, music, etc.) that distinguishes and yet relates French and Francophone identity
  3. Samples of students' work will be drawn from each of the following categories:
    1. One sample essay from each of the following levels: French 300, French 400, and French 500. At least one of the essays should discuss a Francophone topic.
    2. The student's senior capstone project.

A student may request permission to submit a video recording of an oral presentation in place of one essay.

Required for the French minor

Students complete a French minor by taking a minimum of 36 units beyond FREN 202, which will include 12 units at the 300 level and at least 6 units at the 400 level and 6 units at the 500 level. A C or above average in the minor also is required.

French minors will be required to attend at least one Björklunden immersion weekend in either their junior or senior year. Participation in the immersion experience will allow department members to evaluate minors’ levels of proficiency in listening and speaking in a free and unstructured linguistic environment. Students who minor in French are also required to attend at least six meetings of the French Table and complete a short project based on work pre-approved by the department. There will be an oral presentation of the project before at least two members of the department.

Finally, students must declare their intent to minor in French in writing to the department chair in their junior year.

Concerning study abroad

The department urges students to take advantage of the international study programs in France, Senegal, or Quebec.

Placement Examination

The placement examination for students taking French at Lawrence for the first time is available online at the department’s home page. To take the exam, go to http://www.lawrence.edu/academics/study/french_francophone_studies/placement_exams and follow the instructions. The exam may be taken on or off campus. Students wishing to place out of the language requirement by proficiency examination should sign up through the department chair for an oral proficiency interview and writing exam in addition to the placement test.

At the beginning and intermediate levels, courses are numbered to indicate relative difficulty, the lowest numbers identifying those that require the least proficiency in French. At the level of FREN 400 and above, however, students should consult a French instructor.

At whatever level students place, they should plan to begin their study of French in the freshman or sophomore year.

Senior Experience in French and Francophone Studies

French and Francophone Studies requires a Senior Experience that consists of a one-term senior seminar (winter) in which possible research topics are defined and outlined, culminating in a written thesis and an oral, in-class presentation of the student's work. Other types of research projects and interdisciplinary capstones in French may meet the requirement; the possibility of an alternative project must be discussed with the department chair and the student's advisor.

Students pursuing double majors, double degrees, and education certification, are strongly encouraged to consult with their advisors and relevant department chairs to plan and negotiate their overall Senior Experience as early as possible. It is imperative that students interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary capstone that integrates their interests in both majors consult with the department chair by fall of the senior or super-senior year.

Courses - French

FREN 101: Beginning French I

A beginning course designed to give training in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding. This course is for students with no previous training in the French language. It is recommended that students take 101, 102, and 200 in three consecutive terms. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.

FREN 102: Beginning French II

A continuation of French 101. It is recommended that students take 101, 102, and 200 in three consecutive terms. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FREN 101

FREN 191: Directed Study in French

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FREN 195: Internship in French

An opportunity for students to apply their French language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international level. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes readings, discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required. Repeatable for up to 6 units.
Units: 2 OR 3.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

FREN 200: Intermediate French I

A continuation of French 102, structured to help students develop their skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Five class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FREN 102 or placement by the department

FREN 201: Intermediate French II

Designed to help students attain facility in reading and oral comprehension and mastery of basic skills in writing and speaking. Includes grammar review that continues in French 202. Students with two to four years of high school French or the equivalent should contact the department about placement in this course. Four class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FREN 200 or placement by the department

FREN 202: Intermediate French III

A continuation of French 200 or 201, intended to develop further a student’s proficiency in the four language skills. Placement determined by examination and consultation with the instructor. Four class meetings per week.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FREN 200 or 201 or a minimum of three years of high school French or the equivalent

FREN 301: Introduction to French Literary Studies

This course introduces students to a wide range of literary genres through a careful selection of short texts and films. We study how the French have written their literary history to create and reinforce a unique national identity through a close reading of the works of writers such as Villon, Labé, Molière, Voltaire, Hugo, Maupassant, Camus, and Duras.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FREN 202 or consent of instructor

FREN 302: Cinematically Speaking

French films function as a springboard for readings, discussions, oral presentations, and short critical essays. We will briefly examine the history of French film from 1940 to the present, study cinematic techniques, the vocabulary of cinema, and explore the principal themes.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 302
Prerequisite: FREN 202 or consent of instructor

FREN 303: Introduction to Francophone Literary Studies

This course aims at introducing students to the nature and role of literature in the francophone world. Selected pieces from various literary genres (folk tales, poetry, drama, and novels) by writers such as Césaire, Senghor, Diop, Bâ, Jalloun, Kateb, and Memmi will be read. Themes will include colonialism, resistance, and identity formation.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FREN 202 or consent of instructor

FREN 304: Pleasures of the Text

This course’s texts are chosen for their accessibility to advanced intermediate readers of French. Objectives include: increased fluency in reading, vocabulary building, mastery of idiomatic structures, and an exploration of what makes reading worthwhile as well as pleasurable. We sample medieval legends, love poetry, dramatic novellas, and short modern novels.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: FREN 202 or consent of instructor

FREN 325: Destination Dakar

A required course for students who plan to take French 400 that will serve as an introduction to Dakar. Students will be asked to participate in weekly meetings.
Units: 2.

FREN 390: Tutorial Studies in French

Topic of study and the structure of the term’s work depend on the interest of the student, the instructor, and the subject. Tutorials are not substitutes for courses but opportunities to pursue topics suggested by courses.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FREN 391: Directed Study in French

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FREN 395: Internship in French

An opportunity for students to apply their French language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international level. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes readings, discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required. Repeatable for up to 6 units.
Units: 2 OR 3.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

FREN 399: Independent Study in French

A thorough investigation of a topic of a student’s choice, carried out in consultation with an instructor. Students considering an honors project in their senior year should register for this course, for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FREN 400: Senegalese Culture

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks. Offered in alternate years.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 450
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

FREN 401: Senegalese Literature and History

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks. Offered in alternate years.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

FREN 402: French Language

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks. Offered in alternate years.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

FREN 403: Beginning Wolof

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks. Offered in alternate years.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

FREN 404: Senegalese Music

This course is part of the Lawrence Francophone Seminar in which students study in French-speaking West Africa for ten weeks.
Units: 3.
Also listed as Music Repertoire-Perf Study 405
Prerequisite: Must be attending the LU Francophone Seminar

FREN 410: Romantics, Realists, and Rebels

Beginning with Rousseau’s idealistic notions of nature, gender relationships, and social responsibility, this course examines the diverse ways in which Romantics, Realists, and Rebels reacted to the social, cultural, and political upheavals of the 19th century. Through the works of novelists, artists, poets, and musicians such as Chateaubriand, Delacroix, Chopin, Hugo, Balzac, Sand, Flaubert, Baudelaire, and Rimbaud (among others), we trace the wide range of responses characteristic of this turbulent period.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: At least one 300-level course in French or consent of instructor.

FREN 411: Fascism and Film

This course in French must be taken in conjunction with GER 411, taught in English. It will expand on the films made in France by Continental under the Nazi Occupation, 1940-1944. Concurrent registration in GER 411 is required.
Units: 2.
Also listed as Film Studies 411
Prerequisite: One course in French at the 300 level or consent of instructor

FREN 420: Defining Frenchness

This course examines the French national self-image over the centuries, including the creation of a national historical narrative. We will also consider how defining the non-French, the foreigner, and especially the immigrant helps to reify national self-image.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 440: Contemporary Issues in the French-Speaking World

This course is designed to give students insights into the realities of contemporary France and other parts of the French-speaking world (Belgium, Switzerland, Québec, Vietnam, francophone Africa, and the Islands of the Pacific and Indian Ocean) through the study and discussion of literature, essays, film, art, and recent newspaper and magazine excerpts, as well as radio and television broadcasts from the French media.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course or consent of instructor

FREN 445: Media and French Revolutions

In this course, we will think about how mediated representations shape our understanding of the world we live in by investigating the dynamic relationship between diverse forms of media (print, visual, and audio) and the French revolutions of the 19th century, as well as the Franco-Algerian War and the events of May 1968.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course or consent of instructor

FREN 452: Saint Louisian Literature

The first capital of French colonial West Africa, Saint Louis is arguably the cradle of Senegalese literature. This course is a study of the works of selected writers who contributed to the emergence of the literature of the historic city and critically analyzes its thematic concerns and place in the discourse of Senegalese nationhood.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 460: Translation and Stylistics

This course provides students with the knowledge and basic skills involved in translating between English and French. It surveys various approaches to translation, grammatical problems involved, and linguistic and cultural differences. Literary, business, and diplomatic texts will be used.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level course or consent of instructor

FREN 464: Francophone Literature and Screen Adaptations

Focusing on the works of writers and filmmakers such as Sembene Ousmane, Joseph Zobel, Aimé Césaire, D.T. Niane, Dani Kouyate, Euzhan Palcy and Raoul Peck the course examines the interface between the literary and filmic media in raising consciousness about societal challenges, nationhood, power and identity. It also analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of each medium in accomplishing these objectives.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 464
Prerequisite: 300-level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 480: Travelers’ Tales

This course will investigate the dynamic reciprocal relationship between travel, real or imagined, and the development of a discourse on the Other. Drawing on the works of Montaigne, Graffigny, Rimbaud, Baudelaire, Loti, Celine, Maran, Dadié, and Beyala, the course will explore the writers’ fantasies in their attempt to acquaint us with the “exotic.”
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 300-level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 501: Immigrant Voices

This course examines the myths and realities of immigrant life through the writings of Maghrebin and sub-Saharan African francophone writers (Beyala, Diome, Boukedenna, Mounsi, Begag, and Chaouite). The course will address questions of identity, assimilation, acculturation, integration, alienation, and marginalization and various survival strategies.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 400-level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 502: Childhood

This course focuses on the representation of the child in French and Francophone literature. We will examine the construction of childhood by looking at changing notions of innocence, ongoing debates about education, cultural narratives about becoming gendered, and individual narratives about assuming an identity.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 400-level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 503: Women Writing in French

Seeking to uncover lives that had remained largely hidden, women writing in French have revealed and shared their innermost desires and frustrations. French and francophone women writers have braved ostracism to question their identity and their relationship to family and society. Authors may include Duras, Djebar, Cixous, Bugul, Kristeva, Sebbar, Sand, Colette, and Hébert.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Gender Studies 503
Prerequisite: One 400-level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 504: Je t'aime, moi non plus: Franco-American Love-Hate Stories

How did the national friendship forged during the “sister” American and French Revolutions devolve into the post-9/11 enmity-filled era of  “freedom fries” and widespread French-bashing? In this course, we will examine a variety of each nation’s diverse mutual representations in order to better understand the dynamic and often volatile nature of Franco-American cultural relations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 400-level course in French or consent of instructor

FREN 525: La Chose Franco-Arabe: The Franco-Arab Thing

This seminar draws on France's fraught history as a colonial power and its cultivated self-image as an evolved European nation with a distinct cultural standing. The course's primary focus will be the current influence of the Middle East and North Africa on France and French hopes and fears for its national identity. Literary readings, films, and news media will inform students' presentations and essays.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: 300-level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 555: Myths of Paris

In this course, we will examine some of the major literary, cultural, and intellectual movements that have shaped the character of French depictions of Paris from the 18 to the 21st centuries. Special focus will be placed on literary and visual representations of Paris and the construction of its myths.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 400-level course or consent of instructor

FREN 557: The Story of "I": Contemporary Life Writing in France

This course is based on close reading of a variety of life writing forms including coming-of-age narrative, testimonial, the reinvented self, and texts of self-healing. We focus on the ethics of narration (self-distortion, misrepresentation of others, etc.). Our study extends in some cases to cinematic self-representations.
Units: 6.

FREN 568: France Under Nazi Occupation

This course looks at France and its people under Nazi occupation. It examines well-known films and literature produced under German and Vichy censorship and the risks those cultural products did or did not entail. It compares those literary and cinematic texts with more recent attempts to make sense of the difficult period.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: One 400 level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 588: Black Cultural Nationalisms

A study of the variations of black cultural nationalisms in the works of francophone writers from Africa and the Diaspora. This course examines the writers, challenge to the “Négritude” school and the ways in which they articulate plural and locational black identities to affirm their unique sense of national belonging. Readings from authors such as Senghor, Cé’saire, Laye, Condé’, Chamoiseau, Contant, and Glissant.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 584
Prerequisite: One 400-level French course or consent of instructor

FREN 590: Tutorial Studies in French

Topic of study and the structure of the term’s work depend on the interest of the student, the instructor, and the subject. Tutorials are not substitutes for courses but opportunities to pursue topics suggested by courses.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FREN 591: Directed Study in French

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FREN 595: Internship in French

An opportunity for students to apply their French language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international level. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes readings, discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required. Repeatable for up to 6 units.
Units: 2 OR 3.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

FREN 599: Independent Study in French

A thorough investigation of a topic of a student’s choice, carried out in consultation with an instructor. Students considering an honors project in their senior year should register for this course, for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FREN 600: Senior Seminar

Seniors meet with the instructor early in Term I to select a specific topic. They read and discuss texts at the beginning of the Winter Term, then formulate their own projects, which may take them in a direction of their choice (literature, art, history, music, etc.).
Units: 6.

FREN 690: Tutorial Studies in French

Topic of study and the structure of the term’s work depend on the interest of the student, the instructor, and the subject. Tutorials are not substitutes for courses but opportunities to pursue topics suggested by courses.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FREN 691: Directed Study in French

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

FREN 695: Internship in French

An opportunity for students to apply their French language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international level. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes readings, discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required. Repeatable for up to 6 units.
Units: 2 OR 3.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

FREN 699: Independent Study in French

A thorough investigation of a topic of a student’s choice, carried out in consultation with an instructor. Students considering an honors project in their senior year should register for this course, for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

Freshman Studies

Associate professor:G. Bond (English, chair)

Freshman Studies has been the cornerstone of the Lawrence curriculum for over 60 years. Designed by Nathan Pusey, who left Lawrence for the presidency at Harvard, it was first taught in 1945 and is still best understood as an introduction to liberal learning.

Students take Freshman Studies in their first two terms on campus. Each section of the course includes about fifteen students, allowing for close relationships between students and teachers. Because each section uses the same reading list, Freshman Studies also helps students to join in the life of a larger intellectual community, one that now includes generations of Lawrentians.

In keeping with such goals, Freshman Studies is expansive and inclusive. Instead of endorsing a single point of view, the course embraces works from many different traditions. Every division of the curriculum is represented on the syllabus, and recent versions of the course have included works by Plato and Shakespeare, Bishop and Einstein, Borges and Kandinsky, Zhuangzi, Stravinsky, and Milgram.

Through their encounters with such works, students gain an appreciation of different approaches to knowledge. They also join each other in exploring a host of important questions: What is the best sort of life for human beings? Are there limits to human knowledge? How should we respond to injustice and suffering? In addition to raising these questions, Freshman Studies serves more immediate and practical goals. The course encourages lively discussion and introduces students to the conventions of academic writing. In the first term, for example, students learn that a paper must serve the needs of an intelligent, curious reader. They also learn that a good paper should be organized around a central claim or thesis and supported with evidence from the text.

In the second term, students build on these foundations, moving on to more complex forms of argument. Students may be asked to assess the interpretations of earlier scholars or to contrast the treatment of a crucial theme in two very different texts. Through their work in Freshman Studies, then, students begin to master the skills needed for success in more advanced courses.

Courses - Freshman Studies

FRST 100: Freshman Studies I

Required of first-year students and selected transfer students. Through the study of works representing a variety of intellectual and cultural traditions, students develop fundamental skills: the ability to read closely, to speak and write clearly, to persuade a reader and express themselves. Regular class work is supplemented by lectures and performances by Lawrence faculty members or by visiting scholars or artists.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Registration through Dean of Student Academic Services

FRST 101: Freshman Studies II

Required of first-year students and selected transfer students. A continuation of Freshman Studies I, this course is designed to help students refine their abilities as readers, writers, and thinkers. As in Freshman Studies I, instructors stress close reading, cogent discussion, and clear writing. Regular class sessions are again supplemented by lectures and performances by Lawrence faculty members or by visiting scholars or artists.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Registration through Dean of Student Academic Services

Gender Studies

Professors:T. Gottfried (Psychology, chair term I), B. Haines (Psychology), E. Hoft-March (Milwaukee-Downer College and College Endowment Association Professorship French and Francophone Studies, chair terms II and III) (on leave term(s) I), B. Peterson (German)
Associate professors:C. Daughtry (Anthropology), A. Guenther-Pal (German), M. Pickett (Physics), K. Privatt (James G. and Elthel M. Barber Professor of Theatre and Drama Theatre Arts), M. Rico (History)
Assistant professors:I. Albrecht (Philosophy) (on leave term(s) III), L. Murali (Anthropology) (on leave term(s) I), K. Schweighofer (Dean of Faculty Office)
Instructors:H. Boyd Kramer (Dean of Faculty Office), M. Wegehaupt (Dean of Faculty Office)

Gender is a fundamental aspect of personal and social identity and a biological, psychological, and cultural category of paramount importance for people everywhere. In addition, gender is often a criterion for social stratification and different political treatment, as well as a favored symbol for expressing values and beliefs. Gender Studies offers students an opportunity for focused study of such varied issues, in both contemporary and past societies, as human reproduction, gender roles in the family and society, the psychology of identity, sexual orientation, and representations of women and men in literature, music, and art.

Required for the major in gender studies

  1. Two core courses (interdisciplinary in nature):
    • GEST 100: Introduction to Gender Studies
    • GEST 200: Introduction to Feminist Theory and Practice
  2. Two additional cross-listed six-unit courses, cross-listed and offered within various disciplines that focus primarily on gender. These courses must be distributed as follows:
    • One must be either GEST 110 or GEST 350.
    • One must be either GEST 180 or GEST 270.
  3. At least six additional six-unit courses in either Gender Studies or cross-listed, and some may be gender-component courses, as described below. The six courses must be distributed as follows:
    1. At least two courses must be at the level of 200 or above.
    2. At least one course must be at the level of 400 or above.
    3. Up to 6 units of independent study in Gender Studies may be substituted for one course.
    4. One of the six courses must be a Senior Experience of at least six units.

    Courses cross-listed in Gender Studies will count toward completion of the major whether students register for them using the program's designation (GEST) or an individual department's designation.

Required for the minor in gender studies

  1. Two core courses:
    • GEST 100: Introduction to Gender Studies
    • GEST 200: Introduction to Feminist Theory and Practice
  2. Four additional six-unit courses that focus primarily on gender. The four courses must be distributed as follows:
    1. Three must be cross-listed in Gender Studies; the one remaining course may be a gender-component course. If these are gender-component course, students must complete a form (to be signed by the instructor and their Gender Studies advisor) that outlines which course requirements will be fulfilled with work applicable to Gender Studies. This form must be completed and submitted to the Gender Studies advisor by the end of the second week of the term. Forms may be downloaded from the Gender Studies Web page.
    2. At least two courses must be at the level of 200 or above.
    3. Completion of an independent study in Gender Studies can be substituted for one course.

Courses cross-listed in Gender Studies will count toward completion of the minor whether students register for them using the program's designation (GEST) or an individual department's designation.

Senior Experience in Gender Studies

Senior Experience in Gender Studies
Students majoring in Gender Studies will enroll in a Senior Experience that is approved by the Gender Studies Advisory Board and mentored by a Gender Studies faculty member.
The Senior Experience will be at least one term, but may be more depending on the route the student pursues. The experience may be an independent study, an internship/practicum accompanied by an independent study, or an approved project in an advanced course. The Senior Experience will culminate in a senior thesis about the project, and an oral presentation of the student's work. A variety of artistic or research projects, interdisciplinary projects, and projects based on social service or activist initiatives may be appropriate Senior Experiences, but must be approved in consultation with the student's advisor and the Advisory Board.
Students interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary capstone that integrates their interests in Gender Studies with another major or student teaching, are strongly encouraged to consult with their advisors and relevant department chairs to plan and negotiate their overall Senior Experience as early as possible.

Courses - Gender Studies

GEST 100: Introduction to Gender Studies

What is gender? How is it constructed by the social world in which we live? How are our models of masculinity and femininity interwoven with models of race, sexuality, class, nationality, etc.? We will explore these questions theoretically and through interdisciplinary focal points - these may include "testosterone," "beauty," "domesticity," or other examples as chosen by the instructors.
Units: 6.

GEST 110: Gender and Feminism in Historical Perspective

A comparative world history of both gender relations and the emergence of a feminist consciousness within the past 500 years. Case studies drawn from different regions of the world will precede the examination of the emergence of a global feminism in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Topics will include the social roles of men and women, ideas about masculinity and femininity, understandings of sexual orientation, forms of systematic subordination, and the politics of modern feminisms.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 140

GEST 180: The Biology of Human Reproduction

An introductory course focusing on human reproduction to demonstrate some basic biological principles. The course includes discussion of cellular and organismal processes related to the development of human biological complexity. Current research in reproductive biology and its impact on the individual and society is considered. Lecture and laboratory. Primarily for non-science majors; credit not applicable to the biology major.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 100

GEST 191: Directed Study in Gender Studies

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

GEST 195: Internship in Gender Studies

Internships may be obtained in a wide variety of field settings: agencies or organizations focused on education, health care, economics, violence, legal or counseling services, or other arenas in which gender plays a formative role. For example, students might work with a Gay-Straight Alliance or at Planned Parenthood. Students will integrate a scholarly component into their internship with the help of their faculty and on-site supervisor. Students’ Internships may be done during the academic year (at a local placement or on campus) or during the summer. The academic component of the internship includes readings related to the substance of the internship, discussions with the faculty supervisor, and a written report appropriate to the discipline. Course grades are based on this academic work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required

GEST 200: Introduction to Feminist Theory and Practice

Examines and critiques a variety of feminist theories and how they apply to people’s lives today. We explore the tension between feminist theory and practice as we look at significant contributions to the field by women of color, gay and lesbian studies, queer studies, and the study of masculinities.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: GEST 100

GEST 210: Gender, Sports and Society

This lecture/discussion course applies the interdisciplinary study of gender--the social creation and cultural representation of femininity and masculinity--to sport cultures. The course addresses how sports are shaped by gender, race, class and sexuality. Exams and projects engage topics including athletic bodies, soical stratification, media, fandom, nationality and citizenship, ability and disability, sport economics, fitness and body image.
Units: 6.

GEST 220: Women in Early America, 1607-1860

An examination of the experiences of women in early America, focusing both on women’s lives and on the changing economic, political, and cultural roles they played in American society. Themes include women and the family, women’s religious experiences, women and industrialization, and the effects of slavery on black and white women.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 335
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

GEST 222: Music and Gender

This course will explore the relationship between music and gender in the Western world from the Middle Ages to the present. Considering classical and popular music, including music videos and film, as well as writings about gender and music, we will explore music's role as a reflection of, reaction to, and active participant in gender construction.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Musicology 221
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

GEST 256: Transgender Lives

An introduction to the historical and literary representations of transgender people. Using a feminist lens, this course will examine issues such as identity, pathology, representations of the “other,” and of course, cultural ideas about gender norms and appearance.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: GEST 100 or consent of instructor

GEST 261: Feminism and Philosophy

A consideration of the contribution of feminism to a range of subjects of philosophical inquiry, including: the philosophy of mind, ethics and the history of philosophy.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 260
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, sophomore standing, or consent of instructor

GEST 270: The Psychology of Gender

An examination of theory and research on gender identity, gender roles, discrimination, and gender similarities and differences. Topics include gender stereotypes, gender identity development, sexual orientation, sex education, as well as intersections of gender with other aspects of identity.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 310
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

GEST 280: Topics in Gender Studies

Explores a particular topic of current interest in gender studies, and may be cross-listed with other departments. Topics will vary with each offering of the course. Different iterations of the course may be taken for credit with the instructor's consent.

Topic for Winter 2019: Masculinities
This course examines the “who, what, where, when” and perhaps most importantly, the “why” of masculinities. Researching historical definitions of masculinity while also attempting to define for ourselves what masculinity means in the present, this class will open us up to the many critical variables that contribute to the variety of masculinities, variables such as historical and geographical context, race, class, sex, age, ability, sexuality, or beliefs. We will locate the key sites in which masculinity is continually reproduced, both through the institutions that rule our life as well as in the realm of cultural representations. In doing so, will uncover many systems of policing and punishment utilized to bolster certain ideas of masculinity while attacking others.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: GEST 100, or another GEST class and consent of instructor

GEST 300: Introduction to Queer Theory

Offers theoretical frameworks for grappling with social constructions of sexuality alongside those of gender, class, race, and other identity categories. This class, like the field itself, uses the term “queer”  to designate not just people but also practices: it explores representational and interpretive strategies that highlight inconsistencies within our cultural models of sexuality, desire, and subjectivity.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: GEST 100, or another GEST class and consent of instructor

GEST 315: Gender in 20th-Century Africa

An examination of the changing roles of African men and women in the 20th century. The course will focus on the rapid social transformations of the 20th century — colonialism, abolition of slavery, the spread of Christianity and Islam, urbanization, the birth of new nations — and their challenges to traditional understandings of what it meant to be a man or woman.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 220
Prerequisite: Junior standing or some gender studies background

GEST 320: Strong Nations: Perspectives of Contemporary Native American Women

An interdisciplinary examination of issues facing Native American women today. This course explores the ways gender, race and ethnicity shape identity as well as narrative constructions of nation in regional contexts. Readings by contemporary indigenous women authors, with field trips to federally recognized tribal lands and discussion with Native American women leaders, activists, scholars, musicians, artists and business leaders from a variety of nations.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Ethnic Studies 300

GEST 323: Reel Men: Masculinity in American Film, 1945-2000

Focusing on an array of well-known American films — “The Maltese Falcon,” “Red River,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “McCabe and Mrs. Miller,” “Chinatown,” “Die Hard,” and “American Beauty” among them — the course will integrate film theory, gender theory, and American history to address the problem of how masculinity has been constructed in American culture since World War II. Not open to students who have previously received, or need to receive, credit for HIST 400.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 300, Film Studies 300
Prerequisite: Sophomore level or above

GEST 324: Gender and Cinema

This course examines gender and film in an international context. Topics include the construction of femininity and masculinity in film, feminist and queer film theories, analysis of film using intersectional and formal approaches, women behind the camera, and gender and genre.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 324
Prerequisite: FIST 100, GEST 100, the equivalent, or consent of instructor

GEST 325: Black, Brown, and Queer on Film: Race, Gender, and Sexuality on Film

Visual culture has long defined that which is not white, not queer, and not male as deviant from the visual norm. This course will explore the way in which film culture has traditionally positioned people it defines as deviant from the racial, ethnic, gender or sexual norm and the ways in which filmmakers have responded to that positioning.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 325, Ethnic Studies 425
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor

GEST 345: Theorizing the Female Body in East Asian Art

This discussion-based course will examine how tomb murals, paintings, prints, photography, and film have addressed the female body throughout East Asian history. We will explore how social and political issues were defined and negotiated through the gendered images of bodies in Japan, Korea and China in the context of national identity formation, historical reconstruction, subjectivity and sexuality. Coursework will include exams and a research paper.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Art History 345, East Asian Studies 345
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

GEST 350: Anthropology of Gender

An anthropological approach to the study of gender and a/sexuality, and how they intersect with other dimensions of social difference such as race, class, and ethnicity. Topical, ethnographic approach to examining these intersections. Focus on issues such as sexual behavior, reproduction, parenting, trans* identity, work, communication, and violence.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 306
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or GEST 100

GEST 351: Archaeology of Gender

An examination of the relationship between gender and material culture. Focus on how gender and gender roles are reflected in the archaeological record and on the problems in identifying and determining gender roles in prehistory. Readings include studies from both the Old and New Worlds and modern theoretical approaches.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 320
Prerequisite: One anthropology course or consent of instructor

GEST 353: Women in Buddhism

This discussion-based course investigates the ways in which women and gender minorities participate in Buddhist culture around the world. By reading texts by and about Buddhist women, this course will explore the extent to which gender affects social status, leadership roles, and access to education in Buddhist communities in South Asia, East Asia, and the United States.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Religious Studies 353

GEST 362: Vampires, Monsters, and Man-Eaters

This course examines the borders of the human through the figures of the vampire, monster, and femme fatale in literature, film, and the visual arts. Featured in the works of canonized authors as well as within popular culture, “monstrousness” ca