Please note: The course descriptions displayed here are current as of Wednesday, October 18, 2017, but the official Course Catalog should be used for all official planning.

LING 120: Language and Discrimination

This course examines language as a potential site of social statement and, sometimes, social conflict, particularly with respect to questions of “race” and ethnicity. We will explore language-based discrimination, beliefs about language and language variation, and ways language is used to construct and reflect social identities and social group boundaries.
Units: 6.

LING 150: Introduction to Linguistics

Introduction to theory and methods of linguistics: universal properties of human language; phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic structures and analysis; nature and form of grammar.
Units: 6.

LING 191: Directed Study in Linguistics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

LING 210: Language and the Law

An introduction to the field of Forensic Linguistics, the application of linguistics to the language of the law. Topics will include the use of language by various participants in the legal process (judges, lawyers, police, witnesses), the plain-language movement, and the linguist as expert witness.
Units: 6.

LING 225: Language and The City

This course examines the origins and consequences of linguistic diversity in London, using insights from sociolinguistics. We will use the city of London as a kind of laboratory in which to study how social forces influence language use and the ways that languages influence social structure.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Must be attending the Lawrence London Centre

LING 255: Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture

A survey of the Chinese language family, its linguistic structure, dialectal variations, writing system, speech registers, interaction with other languages and the internet world, and its role in reflecting cultural and societal aspects such as social class, familial hierarchy, age and gender, and Confucianism. Taught in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 255
Prerequisite: CHJA 101 or consent of instructor

LING 265: Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture

A survey introducing major characteristics of Japanese language with reference to the structure of Japanese society. Topics include honorifics, use of pronouns, loan words, age and gender differences in the language. The course will also familiarize students with various aspects of traditional and contemporary Japanese culture.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 265, East Asian Studies 265
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; CHJA 112 recommended

LING 310: Introduction to East Asian Linguistics

Survey of genetic, regional, and typological classification of East Asian languages; writing systems for Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Tibetan languages; descriptive and comparative analyses of phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of East Asian languages. More than one language may be investigated in detail.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Chinese and Japanese 310, East Asian Studies 310
Prerequisite: LING 150 and sophomore standing

LING 320: Historical Linguistics

An introduction to the principles and procedures of historical and comparative linguistics: sound change, genetic classification, reconstruction, language variation, and comparative philology. Emphasis on Indo-European, with particular attention to methodology and the historical development of the discipline itself.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150 or consent of instructor

LING 325: Introduction to Sociolinguistics

This course presents an introduction to sociolinguistics, a discipline within linguistics concerned with the systematic investigation of language in relation to the social world. Topics include language variation and change, social identity and language use, linguistic diversity, and language ideologies. We will also practice methods for collecting and analyzing sociolinguistic data.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 331
Prerequisite: LING 150 or ANTH 110

LING 330: Language and Culture

An introduction to the core concepts of linguistic anthropology, definitions of language, basic methods of linguistic anthropology (observation, transcription, analysis, ethnography), power and language, language discrimination, and language ideology theory. Lectures, discussions, and labs.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 330
Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or LING 150

LING 335: Words, Words, Words: Introduction to Lexical Semantics

This course introduces fundamental concepts and research issues in the linguistic study of word meaning. Topics include: representation of word meaning; relation between lexical, truth-conditional and context-dependent meanings; semantic relations; meaning variation; semantic properties of nouns and verbs (e.g. mass-count distinction, verb classes, aspect, semantic roles); interaction between content and function words.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150

LING 340: Introduction to Syntax

An introduction to descriptive analysis of morphological and syntactic structures in natural languages with an emphasis on gaining insight into the nature of such structures, rather than on linguistic formalization. Topics include levels of representation, X-bar theory, case theory, thematic roles, the lexicon, grammatical function-changing rules, and head-complement relations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150 or consent of instructor

LING 350: Introduction to Phonology

An introduction to the formal study of phonetics, phonemics, and phonological analysis and theory. Topics include stress, syllable structure, tones, metrics, phonotactics, and links between phonology and morphology/syntax; exercises on familiar and unfamiliar languages.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150 or consent of instructor

LING 355: Child Language Acquisition

Every normally developing human acquires language in early childhood. This course explores how this feat is accomplished. We will examine data on children’s linguistic knowledge at difference developmental stages and what types of theories might explain these data. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze real child language data.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150, or PSYC 260 or PSYC 265

LING 360: Second Language Acquisition

This course will introduce various issues in the study of second-language acquisition from different perspectives. Topics will include comparisons to first-language acquisition, factors related to second-language acquisition, and learner strategies.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150 or consent of instructor

LING 370: Phonetics

An introduction to the science of speech sounds, focusing on descriptive and experimental studies of articulation and speech acoustics. Laboratory demonstrations of speech production, acoustical analysis, and speech synthesis are combined with lecture/demonstrations to relate phonetics research to theories of phonology and language acquisition.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 375
Prerequisite: LING 150, PSYC 340, or consent of instructor

LING 374: Advanced Grammar Studies

In-depth study of grammar, syntax, and composition that builds on concepts learned in the intermediate courses. Problem areas, particularly at the advanced level of the language, are studied systematically.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 345
Prerequisite: SPAN 202, its equivalent, or consent of the instructor

LING 375: Spanish Phonetics

Spanish Phonetics will immerse students in the pronunciation and general phonetics of the Spanish language as it is spoken in Spain and Latin America. The course will help students to perfect their accent in Spanish and make them aware of the different accents of spoken Spanish. It also will serve Conservatory of Music students who desire to practice their diction in Spanish. Taught in Spanish. Course does not count towards the humanities general education requirement for B.A. and B.A./B.Mus. students. Not open to native speakers of Spanish.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Spanish 340
Prerequisite: SPAN 202, its equivalent, or consent of instructor; not open to native speakers of Spanish

LING 380: Introduction to Morphology

An introduction to morphology, the study of the internal structure of words. Topics include the concept of the morpheme, the structure of words and processes of word formation, inflection versus derivation, and issues in morphological theory. The assignments involve in-depth analyses of data from various languages.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150

LING 390: Tutorial Studies in Linguistics

Available to advanced students of linguistics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

LING 391: Directed Study in Linguistics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

LING 399: Independent Study in Linguistics

Available to advanced students of linguistics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

LING 400: Philosophy of Language

An examination of major theories of meaning, reference, and cognitive content and an attempt to understand how language functions to relate “internal” psychological states to things in the “external” world. Contemporary philosophers are emphasized.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 400
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, junior standing, or consent of instructor; PHIL 150 recommended

LING 405: How to Do Things With Words

An examination of major and cutting edge topics in the philosophy of language and linguistics. Where do word meanings come from? How can one word mean different things in different contexts? How do we promise or make commitments? Why do slurs hurt and jokes amuse? What is the nature of metaphor? Where does the border between what words mean and what speakers mean with words lie? These and other questions will be considered. Appropriate for students with an interest in philosophy, linguistics, or cognitive science.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 405
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, junior standing, or consent of the instructor

LING 420: Topics in Logic

An investigation of topics selected from among the following: consistency and completeness theorems for both sentential and predicate logic, Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem, logical paradoxes (Russell’s Paradox, the Liar Paradox, and Newcomb’s Paradox), and modal-tense logic and its formal semantics.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Philosophy 420
Prerequisite: PHIL 150 or consent of instructor

LING 430: Methods in Linguistic Anthropology

A hands-on introduction to advanced linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics methods and relevant theories. Will cover transcription, discourse analysis, conversion analysis, and narrative analysis. Classes will be a combination of labs, workshops, and seminars. Prerequisites are non-negotiable.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 430
Prerequisite: Junior standing, and ANTH 210 or ANTH 330

LING 450: Topics in the Psychology of Language

An examination of the nature and structure of language, integrating knowledge from linguistics, psychology, neurophysiology, and sociology. Focus on the psychological theories and experimental evidence about language production and perception.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Psychology 540
Prerequisite: PSYC 340, LING 150, or consent of instructor

LING 470: Cognitive Linguistics

Cognitive linguistics is a subfield of linguistics and cognitive science that studies conceptual structure, language, and meaning in relation to general cognitive mechanisms. Topics include cognitive and construction grammars, categorization, construal, image schemas, mental spaces, conceptual metaphors, and conceptual blending.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: LING 150 or consent of instructor

LING 531: Semiotics

Semiotics is the study of signs, symbols, and signification in social life. This course will cover semiotic theory, including theorists such as Saussure, Peirce, Jakobson, Lévi-Strauss, Barthes, and Bakhtin, and the application of semiotics to the study of language and social life, conducted through lectures and seminar-style discussions.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 531
Prerequisite: ANTH 330/LING 330

LING 532: Topics in Linguistic Anthropology

An examination of a particular topic in linguistic anthropology. The specific topic being investigated will change from year to year. Students are expected to do advance reading and independent research. Course may be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2018: Language, Gender and Sexuality
This course will explore the relationships between language, gender and sexuality. We will study how language helps create, maintain and resist social structures surrounding gender and sexuality and also how language is used to express gender and sexual identities. Advanced reading seminar. Prerequisite for this topic: ANTH 306.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Anthropology 530
Prerequisite: ANTH 330 or LING 325 and junior standing, or consent of instructor

LING 590: Tutorial Studies in Linguistics

Available to advanced students of linguistics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

LING 591: Directed Study in Linguistics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

LING 599: Independent Study in Linguistics

Available to advanced students of linguistics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

LING 650: Senior Seminar

In this course students do substantial preparatory work for their senior experience project in linguistics. They identify and develop a research question, do preliminary research, and write a well-conceived research proposal. Topics include linguistic data collection, linguistic argumentation and analysis, and standards of academic writing in linguistics.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Senior standing

LING 690: Tutorial Studies in Linguistics

Available to advanced students of linguistics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

LING 691: Directed Study in Linguistics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

LING 699: Independent Study in Linguistics

Available to advanced students of linguistics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

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