Please note: The information displayed here is current as of Wednesday, June 20, 2018, but the official Course Catalog should be used for all official planning.

2017-2018 Course Catalog

Period: 2017-20182016-20172015-20162014-20152013-2014

This catalog was created on Wednesday, June 20, 2018.


Russian

Associate professor:P. Thomas (chair)
Assistant professor:V. Kononova
Instructor:E. Krizenesky

Lawrence offers a major in Russian studies, a major in Russian language and literature, and a minor in Russian. Requirements for each program are outlined below.

Russian is one of the world’s most important and widely spoken languages. Knowledge of the Russian language helps broaden students’ career opportunities and options in a variety of fields, including business and government service. Students who achieve a high level of language proficiency may wish to pursue internship opportunities available as a result of Lawrence’s connections with Appleton’s sister city in Russia.

In addition, Russian culture, music, art, and literature are extraordinarily rich. While the culture may be best appreciated by those who know the language, those who have no knowledge of Russian can also find much of value and interest in the study of Russian culture.

Students taking Russian at the beginning and intermediate levels concentrate on acquiring skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Majors are strongly encouraged to spend a term studying in Russia. Back on campus, upper-level courses and tutorials enable students to improve their critical and analytical skills, learn more about Russia’s rich literary and cultural traditions, and gain additional speaking practice. At all levels, students have the opportunity to work with tutors who are native speakers and to take advantage of extracurricular activities, such as weekly Russian Table, film showings, and immersion weekends.

Culture and literature courses taught in translation are designed not only for those studying Russian but for all students. These courses have no prerequisites, and they fulfill a number of general education requirements.

Required for the Russian studies major

  1. First-year: RUSS 101, 102, 201 (or the equivalent)
  2. Second-year: RUSS 211, 212, 250
  3. Two courses in literature and culture, 300-level or above
  4. Two courses in history
  5. One course that allows students to understand Russia in a larger context, either by studying the literature or history of a neighboring country or countries or by placing Russia in a broader political and economic context as an important participant in international affairs. Consult faculty for approval of specific courses.
  6. A senior-level independent study that results in the completion of a substantial research paper. Students with sufficiently advanced Russian language skills are encouraged to use some Russian language sources in conducting their research. Topics for this capstone experience are to be derived from work done in one of the following courses: RUSS 300, 305, 330, 335; HIST 315, 320, 325; GOVT 330. Other topics could be approved through consultation with program faculty.

In addition to the requirements listed above, majors are encouraged to further strengthen their Russian-language skills either by taking RUSS 280, 281 and 287 or by studying in Russia and/or in an intensive summer language program offered in the U.S.

Students with prior background in Russian who place out of the first-year sequence are required to complete additional language study for the major.

Required for the Russian language and literature major

  1. First-year: RUSS 101, 102, 201 (or the equivalent)
  2. Second-year: RUSS 211, 212, 250
  3. Two courses in Russian literature taught in translation, level 300 or above
  4. Two courses in Russian literature, taught in the original, level 300 or above
  5. A senior-level independent study that results in the completion of a substantial research paper. Students would be required to analyze some work or works of Russian literature, to be read in the original.

In addition to the requirements listed above, majors are strongly encouraged to further strengthen their Russian language skills by studying in Russia and/or in an intensive summer language program offered in the U.S.

Students with prior background in Russian who place out of the first-year sequence are required to complete additional language study for the major.

Required for the Russian minor

  1. First-year: RUSS 101, 102, 201 (or the equivalent)
  2. Second-year: RUSS 211, 212, 250
  3. Two courses in Russian literature, culture, or history, 300-level or above
  4. C average in the minor

Teacher Certification in Russian (K-12)

Russian majors can seek certification to teach Russian at the elementary and secondary levels. To be certified, students must spend a term in a Russian-speaking country studying the language and culture and must pass an oral and writing proficiency test. Students can add an endorsement in a second area (such as another language or English as a second language) by completing the appropriate minor. Students who plan to seek teacher certification should review the requirements in the Education section of the catalog and meet with the director of teacher education, preferably before the end of the sophomore year.

International and off-campus study

After two years of language study on campus, majors are strongly encouraged to spend a term studying in Russia. Study abroad provides an unparalleled opportunity to make gains in language proficiency and to become familiar with Russian life and culture.

Most Russian majors and minors who choose to study abroad do so through the Lawrence affiliated Bardy-Smolny exchange. This Bard College program partners with Smolny College in St. Petersburg to offer students a comprehensive Russian as a Second Language program in combination with Russian-taught elective courses. The elective courses are integrative and taken with Russian students who are regular degree-seeking students at Smolny.

Students are also encouraged to participate in intensive summer language programs offered in the United States, especially immediately prior to spending a fall term in Russia.

Senior Experience in Russian

The Russian department’s Senior Experience consists of a senior-level independent study that further develops work done in another course.

The independent study is intended to help students prepare their capstone project, normally a research paper that makes use of some Russian-language source material. In addition, students will submit a portfolio in the second week of their final term. The portfolio consists of a list of courses and brief statement in which students evaluate their development as Russian majors.

In addition to a copy of the capstone project and the Russian language portfolio, the senior portfolio should contain four course papers, including at least one from a history course and one from a literature course. The complete portfolio will be reviewed and approved or returned for revisions before the end of the term.

Students who are pursuing a double major or teacher certification should work with all concerned departments to assess the feasibility of an interdisciplinary capstone.


Courses - Russian

RUSS 101: Beginning Russian I

The first course of a three-term sequence. Once students learn the alphabet and pronunciation, they acquire a basis for speaking, understanding, reading, and writing spoken Russian. Cultural information is incorporated throughout the course.
Units: 6.

RUSS 102: Beginning Russian II

Continued practice in speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Cultural information is incorporated throughout the course.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: RUSS 101 or consent of instructor

RUSS 191: Directed Study in Russian

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 195: Internship in Russian

An opportunity for students to apply their Russian language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international levels. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required. Credit may be given for internships completed during a period of study abroad.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 201: Intermediate Beginning Russian

Students acquire a wider range of linguistic structures, which enables them to start speaking, reading, and writing on a higher level.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: RUSS 102 or consent of instructor

RUSS 211: Intermediate Russian I

Grammar review and introduction of more complex grammatical concepts. Students read some authentic literary texts. Cultural information is presented through texts and audio-visual/computer materials.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: RUSS 201 or consent of instructor

RUSS 212: Intermediate Russian II

A continuation of Russian 211. More exposure to literary texts, along with newspaper articles. Video clips continue to improve students’ listening comprehension skills and cultural knowledge.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: RUSS 211 or consent of instructor

RUSS 250: Advanced Intermediate Russian

A continuation of Russian 212. More intensive reading, writing, and conversational practice to provide a transition to study abroad.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: RUSS 212

RUSS 260: The Long Novel (in English)

A comparative study of nineteenth century Europoean realism, with readings taken from a variety of national traditions. Authors studied may include Dickens, Flaubert, and Dostoevsky. Collaborative teaching of each text will expose participants to a wide range of critical and pedagogical methods. With instructor approval students may also register for an additional tutorial (3 units) in which we will read and discuss important theoretical works on the history of the novel form.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 245
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

RUSS 280: Topics in Russian Through Fiction and Poetry

This course advances skills in reading, understanding, writing, and speaking Russian, with materials from the rich traditions of Russian literary culture. Readings include fiction, plays, and poetry. Conducted in Russian, with frequent writing and grammar assignments, in-class presentations, and occasional translation exercises. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.

Topic for Fall 2017: Russian Folk Fairy Tales
This course will introduce advanced students of Russian to the rich tradition of Russian folk tales, while developing students’ reading, speaking, writing, and listening proficiency. Specifically, we will concentrate on the advanced skill of narration. Students will read tales about such all-time favorite characters as Kolobok, Yemelia and his Pike, Baba-Yaga, Kashchei the Deathless, Vasilissa the Beautiful, etc. The readings of the course will be supplemented with cartoons and films. Students will write their own fairy tales; as a final group project, students will shoot a fairy-tale film.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: RUSS 250 or consent of instructor

RUSS 281: Topics in Russian Through Nonfiction

This seminar-style course will allow advanced students an opportunity to further develop their proficiency. Materials include memoirs, journalism, and historical texts. Conducted in Russian, with frequent writing and grammar assignments, in-class presentations, and occasional translation exercises. It will prepare students to do more advanced research in Russian, either here at Lawrence or abroad. May be repeated for credit when topic is different.

Topic for Spring 2018: Russia's Great Patriotic War--History and Memory
In this course, advanced students of Russian will read, watch, and discuss a variety of materials related to the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945)—one of the most traumatic events in the history of twentieth-century Russia. Students will learn about important battles and heroes of the war, read excerpts from war memoirs, look at examples of wartime propaganda, and watch films. We will pay special attention to the question of cultural memory: how is the war remembered and commemorated today? What role does the state play in such commemorations, and how does the society respond to the state efforts? Students will advance their Russian skills through regular reading, writing, and presentation assignments.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: RUSS 250 or consent of instructor

RUSS 287: Topics in Russian Through Film

This course will examine topics in Russian film. Topics may include specific generes (e.g., the sad comedy), the work of a director or tradition, films important for a specific historical moment (e.g., The Thaw or World War Two), or films devoted to a specific theme. Students will expand their Russian vocabulary, improve fluency, increase speaking confidence and gain cultural knowledge by viewing Russian films and analyzing the psychology of the characters. Throughout this course, students will be introduced to the practice of reading the filmic text using three structuring lenses: 1) history, 2) formal and generic elements, and 3) film criticism. May be repeated when topic is different.

Topic for Winter 2018: Kak ya stal russkim
This course is structured around the recent Russian TV series, "Kak ya stal russkim" (“How I Became Russian”). Together with Alex, an American journalist in Moscow, students will discover the complexities of contemporary Russian life. How to relate to your colleagues at work? How to rent an apartment in Moscow? How to interact with police? When and how to give a bribe? What are the cultural norms regarding dating? What are some superstitions that you shouldn’t question? Students will learn and practice a host of colloquial expressions and idioms. The course has a special concentration on the advanced skills of description and comparison.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 287
Prerequisite: RUSS 250 or consent of instructor

RUSS 300: Russia's Golden Age: 19th-Century Literature in Translation

The texts studied in this course are thematically unified by their examination of romantic and sexual relationships, many of which are limited by social restrictions. Some works will be studied in conjunction with film versions. No knowledge of Russian required. Offered every other year.
Units: 6.

RUSS 304: Slavic Science Fiction

This course examines science fiction works from the Slavic world, with concentration on Russia and the Soviet Union. We will explore how Slavic authors reflected on technological progress, humankind's place in the universe, social and political experiments, etc. Lecture/seminar. Taught in English translation. Russian majors and minors may participate in a two-unit turorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in Russian.
Units: 6.

RUSS 305: Repression and Resistance in Soviet and Post-Soviet Literature in Translation

Survey of Soviet and post-Soviet literature from 1920 to the present. Course will explore ways in which writers responded to, helped shape, and reacted against the Soviet system. Works will be set in historical and cultural context. No knowledge of Russian required. Offered every other year.
Units: 6.

RUSS 306: Russia on Stage: Three Centuries of Russian Theater

This course introduces students to the rich theatrical tradition of Russia. The readings for the course span over two centuries, starting from the social comedies of the late eighteenth century to the contemporary "New Drama" and documentary theater. The plays are situated within the larger historical and political context of Imperial, Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. Lecture/discussion. Taught in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Theatre Arts 306

RUSS 307: Men in the Storm of History

Narratives of WW I and the Russian Revolution. Comparisons, where applicable, with American writers influential in Russian letters. Works of Blok, Babel, Sholoxov, Pasternak, Hemingway, and Faulkner.
Units: 6.

RUSS 308: Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Their World (in English)

This course explores the works, thought, and impact of two of the most profoundly important writers of the nineteenth century, Fyodor Dostoevsky and Lev Tolstoy. Possible topics include “ Crimes and Punishments, ” “History and Narrative, ” and “In the Writer’s Laboratory. ” Taught in English. Russian majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in Russian.
Units: 6.

RUSS 310: Russia’s Erotic Utopia

This course examines Russia’s complex debate over the nature of sexuality, decadence, morality and mortality. Themes include the moral nature of procreation, lust, murder, and resurrection. Readings include Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Platonov, and Nabokov, as well as film, opera, paintings, and a television mini series. In English.
Units: 6.

RUSS 312: The Russian Nabokov

This course examines Nabokov’s Russian works in the context of the Russian literary tradition. We will read poems, stories, a play, and three novels by Nabokov, as well as a sampling of the pre-revolutionary, Soviet, and émigré works upon which he drew. In English.
Units: 6.

RUSS 314: Chekhov (in English)

The course focusses on the work, world, and influence of Anton Chekhov. Topics may include “Chekhov and the Russian Short Story,” “Chekhov and Modern Russian Drama,” “Chekhov on the Silver Screen,” and “Chekhov and the West.” Taught in English. Russian majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in Russian.
Units: 6.

RUSS 315: Topics in Dostoevsky and Tolstoy (in English)

This course explores the works, thought, and impact of Fyodor Dostevsky and Lev Tolstoy. Possible topics include: Crimes and Punishments, Spirituality and Religion, History and Narrative, In the Writer's Laboratory. Taught in English. Russian majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in Russian. May be repeated when topic is different.
Units: 6.

RUSS 320: Topics in Russian Film (in English)

This course explores facets of the development of Russian film in its historical and cultural context. Topics may include: “The Golden Age of Soviet Film,” “The Cinema of Tarkovsky,” and “Film as Propaganda.” Taught in English. Russian majors and minors may participate in a two-unit tutorial in which discussions and some course readings will be in Russian.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Film Studies 320

RUSS 323: Topics in Russian History and Culture (in English)

An interdisciplinary course examining the relationship between politics and culture in Russia since the 18th century through the close analysis of a specific historical theme. Emphasis is placed on reading and discussing literary texts, historical primary sources, and, where applicable, watching films. Possible themes include: Power and Culture in the Russian Revolution, 1900-1936; The Soviet 1960s; and The Agony of Populism: Terrorism and Literature in Russia's Nineteenth Century. Not open to students who have previously received, or need to receive credit for HIST 423. (G&C)

Topic for Spring 2018: Power and Culture in the Russian Revolution
A study of the relationship between politics, art, and everyday life in Russia’s revolutionary era. Among the topics studied are: prominent artistic movements such as symbolism, futurism, and constructivism; ideological debates about the role of culture in revolutionary times; efforts to transform the everyday lives of ordinary people by means of propaganda, popular entertainment, and design; and the development of socialist realism. Emphasis is placed on analyzing and discussing historical primary sources and literary texts, works of fine and applied art, and films in a seminar-style format.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 323
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and one course in Russian language, literature, or history

RUSS 335: Through the Eyes of Women: Women and Gender in Russian Culture (in English)

An interdisciplinary survey course that examines femininity, womanhood and identity in Imperial, Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia. Materials include works of fiction, non-fiction, and film. No knowledge of Russian required.
Units: 6.

RUSS 340: Russian TV Talk

Students watch, analyze, and discuss freshly archived Russian television news. Students will increase knowledge of journalistic vocabulary and reporting styles, and develop an understanding of Russian perspectives on national and international events. May be repeated for credit.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: RUSS 250 or consent of instructor

RUSS 354: History of Russian and Soviet Film

This course will introduce the student to the rich and varied tradition of Russian and Soviet cinema from the Pre-Revolutionary period to the present. Works by major filmmakers will be viewed and discussed in the context of the culture, economy, society, and politics of the time. Taught in English.
Units: 6.
Also listed as History 354, Film Studies 354
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

RUSS 361: Survey of 19th- and 20th-Century Russian Prose

Primary goals are to read, discuss, and analyze selected short stories and novel excerpts by some of Russia’s major writers.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Two years of college Russian

RUSS 390: Tutorial Studies in Russian

Advanced work, in Russian, arranged and carried out in consultation with the faculty. Topics depend on the student’s interest, the instructor, and the subject. Tutorials are not substitutes for courses offered elsewhere in the curriculum.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 391: Directed Study in Russian

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 395: Internship in Russian

An opportunity for students to apply their Russian language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international levels. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required. Credit may be given for internships completed during a period of study abroad.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 399: Independent Study in Russian

Individualized advanced research carried out in consultation with a faculty member. Students considering an honors project in their senior year should register for an upper-level independent study for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 590: Tutorial Studies in Russian

Advanced work, in Russian, arranged and carried out in consultation with the faculty. Topics depend on the student’s interest, the instructor, and the subject. Tutorials are not substitutes for courses offered elsewhere in the curriculum.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 591: Directed Study in Russian

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 595: Internship in Russian

An opportunity for students to apply their Russian language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international levels. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required. Credit may be given for internships completed during a period of study abroad.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 599: Independent Study in Russian

Individualized advanced research carried out in consultation with a faculty member. Students considering an honors project in their senior year should register for an upper-level independent study for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 650: Senior Seminar

This seminar is for advanced students to finish a senior capstone. Seniors meet with the instructor early in Fall Term to discuss individual projects and plan a research agenda. In the Winter Term seminar, students read and discuss contemporary academic articles to highlight styles of argument. The rest of the seminar involves writing workshops, presentations of individual research and discussions of specific scholarly methods.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: Declared majors with senior standing

RUSS 690: Tutorial Studies in Russian

Advanced work, in Russian, arranged and carried out in consultation with the faculty. Topics depend on the student’s interest, the instructor, and the subject. Tutorials are not substitutes for courses offered elsewhere in the curriculum.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 691: Directed Study in Russian

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 695: Internship in Russian

An opportunity for students to apply their Russian language skills in business, government, and the non-profit sector on the regional, national, and international levels. Arranged in collaboration with and supervised by a member of the department. Includes discussion, report, and/or portfolio. Advance consultation and application required. Credit may be given for internships completed during a period of study abroad.
Units: 3.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

RUSS 699: Independent Study in Russian

Individualized advanced research carried out in consultation with a faculty member. Students considering an honors project in their senior year should register for an upper-level independent study for one or more terms.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

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