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ACADEMIC ADVISING INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS:

Advising Assignments

At Lawrence, we believe that students should receive individual attention from the faculty both as instructors and as academic advisors. In those ways, faculty members help students to explore the curriculum and achieve the most from their learning experiences.

Therefore, all Lawrence students are assigned a faculty member as an academic advisor.That assignment is made when new students submit the required Advisor Information Form. For fall term (September) matriculation, the Advisor Information Form is due by July 10th.

The Dean for Student Academic Services assigns new students to faculty advisors in particular university departments or divisions based upon the academic interests noted on the Advisor Information Form. However, due to the number of faculty in each department, it is not always possible to initially assign every new student to an advisor associated with an identified academic interest or intended major. Nevertheless, all students may be assured that they will get good assistance in making decisions about their curriculum choices and in adjusting to the academic environment. The name of your advisor will appear in your Voyager account under Academic History later in the summer after advising assignments are complete.

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ACADEMIC ADVISING INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS:

Advising Meetings

During Welcome Week, you will meet your advisor at the Advising Luncheon. At that time, you will learn more about the role your advisor will play in your education and your responsibilities in the advising relationship. For now, you should review the information in Advising FAQ.

You also will schedule an individual meeting with your advisor to discuss your responses on the Advisor Information Form, to review your registration choices for the fall term, to make course selections for the winter and spring terms, and to address any questions you may have as you begin the exciting and engaging experience of a liberal education.

Registration for new students will occur at the end of Welcome Week, following the individual advising meetings.

If you are a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree student and register for courses in the summer, you may then make changes to your fall registration if necessary and add courses for winter and spring terms.

If you are a Bachelor of Music (B. Mus.), Double-Degree (B.A./B. Mus.), or Visiting/Special student, you will have your first opportunity to register for fall, winter, and spring terms during Welcome Week. But you should nevertheless plan your schedule during the summer.

You should stay in regular contact with your academic advisor during the year to assess your academic performance and perhaps to make changes to your schedule.

All students are required to have an advisor in their declared major by their junior year. We recommend that students decide on their major advisor before advance registration in the spring (April) of their sophomore year as they plan their schedules for their junior year. If your initial advisor will not be your major advisor, or if you would like a different (or additional) advisor, you will have a chance to make advisor changes. For more information, see Advising FAQ.

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ACADEMIC ADVISING INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS:

Advisor Information Form

Complete and submit your responses to the Advisor Information Form. For fall term matriculation, submit the form by July 10th.

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ACADEMIC ADVISING INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS:

Policy on Academic Accommodations

Lawrence offers a broad range of assistance to students with documented disabilities. Our policy regarding students with disabilities states:

The commitment of Lawrence University to provide a quality liberal education carries with it a commitment to a learning environment which provides all students with an equal opportunity for academic success. Lawrence University, in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, recognizes that qualified students who have diagnosed handicaps, including specific learning disabilities, are entitled to an equal opportunity to benefit from the education program of the university and that reasonable accommodations may be necessary to provide that opportunity.

All students with disabilities are encouraged to provide the Office of Student Academic Services (Briggs Hall, first floor) with a diagnostic report (which will be kept confidential) and to contact Geoff Gajewksi, Associate Dean of Faculty for Student Academic Services, who coordinates services for students with disabilities (click here for contact information). He can address your questions about procedures for requesting academic accommodations and other support services.

Click here for more information.

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CHOOSING YOUR CLASSES:

INTRODUCTION

The Academic Program

Please read this information before completing the Voyager registration. 

The first step in planning your academic program is to understand a liberal arts education, which is described in two selections of the Course Catalog, "Liberal Learning" and "Planning an Academic Program." During your years at Lawrence you will study broadly and intensively, so take some time to become familiar with the Course Catalog, for it presents the opportunities that Lawrence offers you. As you read the Catalog, think about what you want to accomplish during your college years.

Placement Information and Directions

Placement exams are required for students with any previous background in the following studies who intend to continue those studies at Lawrence: Spanish, French, German, Russian, Latin, Greek, Chinese, Japanese, math, biology, chemistry, and music theory.

Click here for more specific information about placement, links to department home pages and on-line placement tests.

Course Numbers and Levels

Lawrence uses 3-digit course numbers, for instance, the course in the English department titled Literary Analysis has the designation ENG 150. Although some variety exists, most departments follow this number system to indicate course levels.

The course levels are distinguished as Introductory Courses (100-199), Foundation/Gateway Courses (also called "intermediate" and numbered 200-399), Advanced Courses (400-599), and Capstone Courses (600-699). 

Not every department follows this system precisely; details about the variations are given in the department descriptions in the catalog. You will benefit from carefully reading the Course Catalog information on each department and course in order to make appropriate choices. Click here for information about course numbers and levels.

Please note that course level numbers are different from CRNs (class reference numbers). The 4-digit CRN must be used for registration. But because the CRN is randomly assigned, it has no meaning when determining the level of a course.

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CHOOSING YOUR CLASSES:

NEW BACHELOR OF ARTS STUDENTS

You will be assigned to fall and winter term Freshman Studies sections by the registrar’s office later in the summer. (Freshman Studies is Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 11:10am to 12:20pm). So for your advance summer registration, you will select just two courses for the fall term

You will register for winter and spring terms during Welcome Week following your meeting with your academic advisor. Nevertheless, you should think about which courses you might like to take in the winter and spring and come prepared to discuss various options. That is why it is important for you to read the information on planning your academic program and other recommended materials.

Additional Information for B.A. and B.A./B. Mus. Program Students

Students Planning to Major in Math, Physics, or a Foreign Language:

First-Year Course Requirements

The following majors have recommended sequences for your first year of study. Use this information in planning for your course registration if you are interested in any of these major areas of study.

If these choices pose a problem, plan to discuss your concerns with your advisors in the fall.

1. Mathematics

Fall Term Math 140
Winter Term Math 150
Spring Term Math 160

A mathematics major or a mathematics-computer science major must complete the calculus sequence by the end of the first year to avoid serious scheduling conflicts in later years.

2. Physics

Fall Term Math 140
Winter Term Math 150 or Physics 151
Spring Term Math 160 or Physics 160

Since the blended dual degree program allows you to take one course per term in the college, we recommend that you enroll in Physics 151 and 160 in your first year to get immediate exposure to physics.  Planning a physics/music program requires careful coordination of both components and you should consult with both advisors early and often.  

3. Foreign Languages

Whether or not you are considering a major in a foreign language, you should take the placement test in the language in which you have some training and an interest in pursuing (see Foreign Language Study). The foreign language departments strongly recommend at least one course in your first year so that you do not lose your language skills. The departments also recommend that you begin planning well in advance if you intend to enroll in one of the language seminars abroad. You should consult with a faculty member in the department of your probable major in order to plan your program of study.

Degree Requirements

In planning your academic program, you will choose some courses to explore a possible major; you will choose others to examine new disciplines; and you will choose a few just because you are curious. We encourage you to experiment and not to worry if you have not determined a major or if you have not yet made a career choice. Graduates of liberal arts colleges find that they are prepared for a variety of jobs and most of our students do not declare a major until the end of their sophomore year. 

You should keep in mind the general education requirements (GERs) as you choose your courses for next year and think about the following years. 

Foreign Language Study

We require that all students in the B.A. program achieve an intermediate (200-level) competency in a foreign language. If you have taken little or no foreign language in high school, begin your foreign language study at the introductory level and take a three-term sequence (courses numbered 101,102, 200 or 201). By completing this sequence, you will meet the competency requirement. If you previously have studied French, German, Spanish, or Russian, you must take the on-line placement exam to determine your proficiency and which, if any, class(es) you will need to take to meet the foreign language requirement. For other languages, see the appropriate department’s explanation of placement (or refer to the department’s home page); then estimate your own placement and whether or not you will need to take a class to meet the requirement.

International students who completed secondary school in English will need to demonstrate college-level competency in their native language, or bring verification of fluency from a school authority in their home country.

Click here for more information about the Foreign Language Requirement and placement exam.

Music Study for Bachelor of Arts Students

B.A. with a Music Major

If you are interested in majoring in music as a Bachelor of Arts student, you may wish to consider taking the beginning music theory sequence (Music Theory/Sight Singing/Aural Skills), basic keyboard skills, lessons, and/or an ensemble. For more information see Conservatory of Music.

Music Study for B.A. with a Non-Music Major

Many non-music majors at Lawrence elect to participate in music ensembles and/or take private lessons. If you intend to pursue music in this way, you should discuss your interest with your academic advisor. Official registration for music study does not occur until the fall, after auditions for ensembles and lessons during Welcome Week. Students are assigned to studios on the basis of this audition and faculty availability and only after all music degree students have been accommodated. If accepted for music study, non-majors pay $250.00 per term for half-hour weekly lessons or $500.00 per term for hour-long weekly lessons. For more information see Conservatory of Music.

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CHOOSING YOUR CLASSES:

New Bachelor of Music Students

As a Bachelor of Music student, you will not be registering during the summer. Your courses are, for the most part, prescribed for the year, although you will have an elective course option for the spring term; therefore, you do not need to advance register. Instead, you will complete your registration during Welcome Week. So think about what elective course you would like to take, and review the following information about the B. Mus. program.

Your program includes several required courses, and you will need to take the Music Theory Placement Test to determine appropriate course placement.

The first year music theory sequence includes three terms of music theory, aural skills, and sight singing. Your section of each course will be determined by the results of an on-line placement test taken during the summer. You also are expected to take a lesson each week in your performance area throughout your entire program. A course in Basic Keyboard Skills, in which you must demonstrate proficiency by the end of the first year, is required if you are not a keyboard major. If you are a keyboard major, you will take Functional Skills for Keyboard Majors during winter and spring terms. All Bachelor of Music students are expected to participate in a large ensemble, with placement determined by audition during Welcome Week. Click here for information about Conservatory Placement Exams and Ensemble Auditions.

You also will be assigned to a Freshman Studies section in the fall and winter terms. This two-term course will help you develop your writing and discussion skills and will serve as an introduction to the liberal arts.

The one elective during spring term is an opportunity for you to think broadly about your intellectual and academic interests. You should choose a college course for this elective. If you are unsure about appropriate course levels or prerequisites, consult the department information in the Course Catalog (or the department home page). These sources will provide information to help you make a decision.

During Welcome Week, your faculty advisor will discuss your music curriculum and registration with you, and provide you with information about your options. These advising meetings are designed as a time to discuss your questions and concerns with your advisor (see Information about Academic Advising for New Students).

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CHOOSING YOUR CLASSES:

New Bachelor of ARTS/BACHELOR OF Music DOUBLE DEGREE Students

As a Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Music student, you will not be registering during the summer. Your courses are, for the most part, prescribed for the year, although you will have an elective course option for the spring term; therefore, you do not need to advance register. Instead, you will complete your registration during Welcome Week.

The double degree program (B.A./B.Mus.) is rigorous, combining required courses in both the college and the conservatory. As a consequence, several courses you will take are already determined. During the first year you will be assigned to a Freshman Studies section for fall and winter terms. This two-term course will help you develop your writing and discussion skills and will serve as an introduction to the liberal arts.

In their first term, most double-degree students begin the music theory sequence, which includes three courses: music theory, aural skills, and sight singing. Your section of each course will be determined by the results of an online placement test taken during the summer. In addition, you will have either a half hour (3 units) or one hour (6 units) weekly lesson in your major performance area. If you are not a keyboard major, you will take a course in Basic Keyboard Skills in order to acquire proficiency by the end of the first year. If you are a keyboard major, you will take Functional Skills for Keyboard Majors during winter and spring terms. Finally, all music students are expected to participate in a large ensemble, with placement determined by audition during Welcome Week. Click here for information about Conservatory Placement Exams and Ensemble Auditions.

You will be assigned faculty advisors in both the College and the Conservatory to help you carefully plan your studies for both degrees. Both advisors will meet with you during Welcome Week to discuss how to choose between blended study and primary music study and will help you decide which is best for you. After this advising session, you will have an opportunity to register. For now, you may wish to think about three different ways to pursue the curriculum in the coming year.

One option, the one most double-degree students take, is primary music study. This plan allows you to take a 6-unit (one hour) lesson in your major performance area in addition to the other music requirements and Freshman Studies. You will have only one college elective, scheduled for spring term of the first year. Because you focus on music in the first year, your last year of study is focused on the college degree.

In this curriculum, you take Freshman Studies in fall and winter terms and a college elective in the Spring Term. All other course work is in the Conservatory. The schedule will have 20 units per term and look like this:

Freshman Studies (or elective in spring term) – (6 units)
Music Theory (4 units)
Sight Singing (1 unit)
Aural Skills (1 unit)
Applied Music (Private Lesson) (6 units)
Music Ensemble (1 unit)
Basic Keyboard Skills (1 unit) – or Functional Keyboard Skills in winter and spring terms if keyboard major

Another option is blended study. This plan allows you to take, in addition to Freshman Studies, a college course each of the three terms. In blended study, you will take a 3-unit (one-half hour) lesson in your major performance area in addition to the music theory sequence, Basic Keyboard Skills, and participate in a large ensemble. This option is designed for the double-degree students who would like to pursue both degrees at the same time. The curriculum is rigorous so choose this option only if you are naturally organized and highly motivated about both degrees.

Your private music lesson is reduced from one hour to one half hour in order to reduce the stress of your load. Your load would be 23 units:

Freshman Studies (or elective in spring term) – (6 units)
Music Theory (4 units)
Sight Singing (1 unit)
Aural Skills (1 unit)
Applied Music (Private Lesson) (3 units)
College elective (6 units)
Major Ensemble (1 unit)
Basic Keyboard Skills (1 unit) – or Functional Keyboard Skills in winter and spring terms if keyboard major

Finally, you may decide to take a primary college option and postpone the music theory sequence. In some rare situations, students will choose a primary college curriculum, which emphasizes college work in the first year, leading to a more intense emphasis on music in their later years at Lawrence. In this curriculum, music theory, aural skills and sight singing are left until the sophomore year. We do not advise this plan without a full discussion with your advisors about your double-degree intentions.

The typical primary college schedule will be 22 units:

Freshman Studies (or elective in spring term) – (6 units)
College Elective (6 units)
College Elective (6 units)
Applied Music (3 units)
Music Ensemble (1 unit)

Additional Information for Double-Degree Program Students

Students Planning to Major in Math, Physics, or a Foreign Language:

First-Year Course Requirements

The following majors have recommended sequences for your first year of study. Use this information in planning for your course registration if you are interested in any of these major areas of study.

If these choices pose a problem, plan to discuss your concerns with your advisors in the fall.

1. Mathematics
Fall Term Math 140
Winter Term Math 150
Spring Term Math 160

A mathematics major or a mathematics-computer science major must complete the calculus sequence by the end of the first year to avoid serious scheduling conflicts in later years.

2. Physics

Fall Term Math 140
Winter Term Math 150 or Physics 150
Spring Term Math 160 or Physics 160

The second of these programs is preferred because it gives you an immediate exposure to physics. Planning a physics/music program requires careful coordination of both components and you should consult with both advisers early and often.

3. Foreign Languages

Whether or not you are considering a major in a foreign language, you should take the placement test in the language in which you have some training and an interest in pursuing (see Foreign Language Study). The foreign language departments strongly recommend at least one course in your first year so that you do not lose your language skills. The departments also recommend that you begin planning well in advance if you intend to enroll in one of the language seminars abroad. You should consult with a faculty member in the department of your probable major in order to plan your program of study.

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CHOOSING YOUR CLASSES:

NEW VISITING INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS (NON-DEGREE)

As a visiting international student, you will not be registering during the summer. Instead, you will complete your registration during Welcome Week. Nevertheless, you should begin to plan your academic program and prepare to discuss your course choices with your academic advisor during Welcome Week. After your individual advising meeting, you will be able to register. Visiting students are not required to take Freshman Studies, but if one of your purposes in studying in the United States is to improve your English skills, Freshman Studies may be very useful. If you are interested in taking Freshman Studies, contact the Associate Dean of Faculty for Student Academic Services (click here for contact information). Choose other courses on the basis of your interests, your class standing, and the prerequisites.

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CHOOSING YOUR CLASSES:

NEW WASEDA UNIVERSITY STUDENTS (NON-DEGREE)

As a Waseda student, you will not be registering during the summer. Your first term of study will help introduce you to American education and Lawrence's educational expectations. It also will provide an intensive study of academic English. So in the fall, your schedule is a required mix of classes, including:

UNIC 110: ESL Freshman Studies
UNIC 206: English in the American University
UNIC 209: Experiential Language Learning
UNIC: 211: Introduction to American Society

You will have more choices in Terms II and III. During Welcome Week, you will meet with your academic advisor to discuss your course choices and your other academic questions. Your advisor will discuss your schedule and your options for classes each term, and will guide you to sources of academic support. You should stay in regular contact with your academic advisor during the year, as that person can help you understand the American system of education.

See registration information for program details.

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COURSE PLACEMENT INFORMATION AND PLACEMENT EXAMS:

INTRODUCTION

Placement tests are offered by several but not all university departments. Results of the tests along with advice from departmental representatives will be helpful to you and your faculty advisor in deciding course levels for final registration. Placement tests will be particularly helpful if you plan to continue a subject you already have studied in high school. For most of the following courses/departments, a placement test or consultation with the department representative is mandatory.

Please read this information carefully.

Advanced Placement (AP) Scores and Course Credit/Placement

You may be able to receive 6 units of Lawrence credit for a score or 4 or 5 on Advanced Placement Exams. AP credit may be used to satisfy most competency (except for writing or speaking) and diversity general education requirements. You also may satisfy course prerequisites as determined by individual academic departments. Click here for a listing of department placement recommendations for AP credits.

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COURSE PLACEMENT INFORMATION AND PLACEMENT EXAMS:

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

Please note that all students who receive a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Exam administered by the Educational Testing Service will have completed the foreign language competency requirement. Those whose placement on the Lawrence exam is above the intermediate level should see the department web site home page for more information about completing the competency requirement.

It is preferable that you take the placement test for French, Spanish, Russian, or German on-line before arriving on campus (see specific instructions below).

French, German, Russian, and Spanish

All students who wish to continue the study of French, German, Russian, or Spanish are required to take a placement exam. The exam must be taken before registering for classes (only students who have never taken a previous course in the language may register without taking the placement exam). The results are valid for one academic year only. The course recommended for placement must be taken within the three terms following the placement exam; otherwise the exam must be retaken. Students must take the exam on-line. Please refer to the appropriate department home page on the Lawrence University Academics web site for more details. Or enter directly one of the following web addresses:

- French

- German

- Spanish

- Russian

When you are ready to take the exam, click here and use the password vikings1.

Students who do not take one of these placement exams during the summer and later decide to enroll in French, German, Russian, or Spanish may take the exam during Welcome Week before completing their registration.

Greek and Latin

Students who have studied Latin or Greek in high school are advised to consult with the department chair, who will carefully assess the quantity and quality of each student's background in order to ensure proper placement. For Latin, the following general guidelines apply: students with four years of high school Latin may enroll in any Latin course numbered 200 or above at any time; students with three years may do likewise but may prefer to refresh their knowledge of the language by taking Classics 110; those with two years may enroll in Classics 110, but those with only one year of high school Latin would be best advised to begin anew in Classics 100. Students who have studied Greek in high school should definitely consult with the department chair. 

For more information see the Classics Department home page.

Chinese and Japanese

Students who have studied Chinese or Japanese in high school should see language instructors in the department prior to the beginning of classes for individual placement.

Go to the department home pages for more information:

- Chinese

Japanese

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COURSE PLACEMENT INFORMATION AND PLACEMENT EXAMS:

BIOLOGY

The biology department will offer exemption exams for two introductory courses for students who wish to try to test out of one or more courses:

Integrative Biology: Cells to Organisms (BIOL 130)
Integrative Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems (BIOL 150)

Exemption from one or two of the three introductory level courses is only determined by the exemption exam; there is no automatic exemption based on AP or IB tests.  Students with either formal or informal training in biology are permitted to take one or both exams; however, students with only a single year of biology in high school have little chance of placing in courses more advanced than Biology 130. Students who have had particularly strong preparation (at least two years) in high school biology or IB Biology may take the test(s). The subject matter for each exam will be that listed under the course descriptions in the catalog. Placement earned through the exam can be used for requirements in the biology major. A maximum of 6 units in biology can be awarded based on placement exam or Biology Advanced Placement Examination results administered by the Educational Testing Service, but a high AP score does not automatically exempt students from Biology 130 or Biology 150.  The laboratory portion of both courses is unique and builds important skills; thus it is to a student's advantage to take the courses.  Questions may be directed to the department chair.

It should be noted that, in addition to the testing during Welcome Week, a student may arrange to take any or all of the exams at any time during the year. Please contact the chair of the biology department.

Click here for more information about the Biology Department.

You need not register in advance for these exams. Times will be posted after you arrive on campus.

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COURSE PLACEMENT INFORMATION AND PLACEMENT EXAMS:

CHEMISTRY

Students planning to study chemistry but who have had no high school chemistry should plan to enroll in Chemistry 115, though they will need instructor approval to register. Students with AP or IB scores or who have had Chemistry 115 or an equivalent introductory course need not take the placement exam. Otherwise, students continuing in chemistry should take the exam to see if placement in Chemistry 116 is appropriate. Click here for more information and access to the Chemistry Placement Exam.

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COURSE PLACEMENT INFORMATION AND PLACEMENT EXAMS:

MATHEMATICS – Calculus 

Placement

Generally, students seeking only proper placement in calculus (rather than Lawrence credit) need not take the Lawrence placement/credit exam. Students who wish to enter Applied Calculus I (Mathematics 120) and who have sufficient preparation (three years of high school mathematics) may register without taking a placement exam and without consulting the mathematics department. Students who wish to enter Calculus I (Mathematics 140) and who have sufficient preparation (four years of mathematics with good grades, including at least pre-calculus) need not take a Lawrence placement exam but must consult with the mathematics department concerning proper placement. Students with at least a year of calculus who wish to place into Calculus II or Calculus III (Mathematics 150 or 160) should also consult with a member of the mathematics department regarding proper placement. Generally, suitable placement into the calculus sequence can be ascertained through consultation alone, without the Lawrence placement/credit exam.

Credit

Students who seek not just placement but Lawrence credit for previous work in calculus (and who will not already have received credit either through transfer of course credit from another college or through the AB or BC advanced placement (AP) exam of the College Entrance Examination Board) should expect to take the Lawrence placement/credit exam during Welcome Week. Students who received a 4 or 5 on the AB or BC exam do not need to take the Lawrence placement/credit exam; these students will automatically receive the appropriate Lawrence credit as well as written recommendations from the department regarding placement.

Choosing the right calculus sequence

The mathematics department offers two quite different calculus sequences: the standard sequence (Calculus I, II, III) and the applied sequence (Applied Calculus I, II). Any student intending to major in mathematics, mathematics-computer science, mathematics-economics, physics, or chemistry, or any student intending to take mathematics courses more advanced than calculus (other than Mathematics 207) must complete the standard sequence. Any student who has always enjoyed mathematics and has been very good at it should enter the standard sequence. Properly prepared students should enter this sequence their freshmen year. Proper preparation means a strong high school mathematics background with good grades, certainly including a pre-calculus or elementary functions course, and good SAT or ACT scores in mathematics.

The applied sequence does not prepare students for more advanced courses in mathematics (because it demands less technical and theoretical proficiency than the standard sequence), but it does help prepare students for more advanced work in the life and social sciences (because it stresses the applications of calculus to these and other areas).

Click here for more information about the Mathematics Department.

You need not register in advance for these exams. Times will be posted after you arrive on campus.

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COURSE PLACEMENT INFORMATION AND PLACEMENT EXAMS:

MUSIC

The music theory placement examination is required of all new music majors, including transfer students. Non-majors planning to enroll in MUTH 201—First Year Theory and Analysis—are also required to take this examination. Students are placed in the appropriate class section on the basis of this exam. All new students who plan to enroll in music theory must also take a Sight Singing placement exam.

Students with substantial background in music theory may also take an advanced placement exam to determine their possible exemption from parts of the first year theory sequence.

A placement exam evaluating keyboard skills is required of all Bachelor of Music students whose primary instrument is not keyboard and all Bachelor of Arts students planning a music major.

The results of the placement exams can be used for granting of credit, general education requirements, or requirements in the major.

Click here for information about Conservatory Placement Exams and Ensemble Auditions.

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Review of the General Education Requirements:

Bachelor of Arts Degree and B.A./B.Mus. (Double Degree)

To ensure that Lawrence students gain familiarity with the principal academic disciplines and with the modes of thought and expression appropriate to each, approximately one-third of the coursework required for the bachelor’s degree is in general education.

The general education component of each degree program consists of three parts. The purpose of the distribution requirements is to ensure that students graduating from Lawrence experience the breadth of study central to a liberal arts education. The purpose of the diversity requirements is to prepare students for positions of leadership within an increasingly diverse American society and an increasingly interconnected world. The skills represented by the competency requirements are fundamental to the study of the liberal arts and prerequisites for success in any discipline or profession.

  • Distribution Requirements 24 units – To provide breadth to their studies, students are required to take courses across all four divisions. The required course in the natural science division must be a laboratory course.
    • 6 units from departments and courses listed within the Division of Humanities (foreign languages, English, classics, history, philosophy, and religious studies). All courses taught in the English language will count; all courses taught in a foreign language numbered 300 or above also will count except as noted in the course catalog.
    •  6 units from departments and courses listed within the Division of Fine Arts: art, art history, music (any subject), or theatre-drama.
    •  6 units from departments and courses listed within the Division of Social Sciences: anthropology, economics, government, psychology or education studies.
    • 6 units from laboratory courses in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics.
  • Diversity (Alternative Perspectives) Requirements 12 units – This requirement aims to provide students with "a more complex understanding of cultural and social diversity." The requirements are not a cafeteria-style sampling of different cultural traditions but rather a means of helping students understand how they are connected to the diversity of humanity, and how one’s personal identity is inextricably tied to the identities of others.
    • 6 units from courses designated as either emphasizing global perspectives and issues or focusing on areas outside Europe and the United States. Classes meeting this requirement are identified in the class schedule, designated with a "G."
    • 6 units from courses designated as focusing on dimensions of diversity—such as race, ethnicity, and gender—that are of particular importance in understanding contemporary society in the United States. Classes meeting this requirement are identified in the class schedule, designated with a "D."
  • Competency Requirements 18-24 units – Four different competencies are critical to a well-educated person: foreign language, writing, speaking, and mathematical reasoning/quantitative analysis.
    • Writing Intensive Requirement: 6 units – This requirement acknowledges the crucial importance of writing in all disciplines and provides students the opportunity to learn to write in the forms and styles most relevant to their work at Lawrence, and to build on the writing skills encouraged in Freshman Studies. (This requirement must be fulfilled at Lawrence University.) Classes meeting this requirement are identified in the class schedule, designated with a "W."
    • OR Speaking Intensive Requirement: 6 units – The main goal is to help students become more thoughtful, organized and effective speakers and, as a result, better thinkers. (This requirement must be fulfilled at Lawrence University.) Classes meeting this requirement are identified in the class schedule, designated with a "S."
    • Mathematical Reasoning/Quantitative Analysis Requirement: 6 units – This requirement acknowledges the increasing use for mathematics, statistics and quantitative reasoning in disciplines other than math itself. Classes meeting this requirement are identified in the class schedule, designated with a "Q."
    • Foreign Language Requirement: 6 units in a foreign language class numbered 200 or above - The goal of this requirement is for students to reach competency in a foreign language. Please see Foreign Language General Education Requirement section in Course Catalog or Foreign Language Study for details.

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Review of the General Education Requirements:

Bachelor of Music Degree

To ensure that students pursuing only the Bachelor of Music degree gain familiarity with the broad liberal arts curriculum at Lawrence, approximately one third of the coursework is in general education. Students are required to take at least 60 units in the college, including courses to meet the following requirements:

  • 6 units selected from courses designated as writing intensive.
  • International diversity. One of the following:
    • 6 units selected from courses designate as either emphasizing global and comparative perspectives on the world or focusing on areas outside Europe and the United States (courses designated with a "G").
    • 12 units selected from courses numbered below 200 in a single foreign language. This requirement may also be satisfied by attaining a score of 4 or 5 on an Advanced Placement examination or by passing a proficiency examination administered by a Lawrence University foreign language department.
    • Participation for one term in a Lawrence or affiliated off-campus study program held outside the United States.

During your first year of study you will take these courses within the college:

  • Fall and winter terms you will be enrolled in Freshman Studies.
  • Spring term you will take one 6-unit course within the college.

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Review of the General Education Requirements:

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Students, including heritage speakers of foreign languages taught at Lawrence, must fulfill the language requirement by demonstrating proficiency in four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) at the 200 level or above (Bachelor of Arts) or, in some cases, at the level of 102 or above (Bachelor of Music). Students may demonstrate proficiency in a variety of ways:

Coursework in language taught at Lawrence University

  • Students may begin or continue language study at Lawrence and fulfill the requirement by completing a course at the appropriate level.
  • Students may participate in certain affiliated off-campus programs with language components and fulfill the requirement by completing a course at the appropriate level. Not all programs have qualifying courses. A list of programs is available through the Office of International and Off-Campus Programs.

Examinations

  • Students may take and pass the Lawrence University proficiency examination in a foreign language at the appropriate level. The language department involved will determine placement and whether the foreign language General Education Requirement will be waived. Degree credit is not awarded for these examinations.
  • Students may obtain a score of 4 or 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination or a score of 6 or above on an International Baccalaureate Examination in foreign language. This option carries credit equal to one six-unit course.

Additional Examination Options for Spanish

  • Students may obtain a score of 630 or higher on the SAT II Spanish or Spanish with Listening exam. No additional academic credit is awarded.
  • Students may present documentation for CLEP credits in Spanish. Four CLEP semesters will complete the requirements for the B.A. and B.A./B.Mus. degree programs. Two CLEP semesters will complete the requirement for the B.Mus. degree program. No degree credit will be awarded for CLEP examinations.

Languages other than those taught at Lawrence University

Students, including those participating in affiliated off-campus programs with a language component, who have studied a foreign language other than those taught at Lawrence and wish to use it to complete the requirement must demonstrate proficiency in all four skills (see above) at the 200 level (B.A.) or at the level of 102 or above (B.Mus.). They shall demonstrate proficiency in one the following ways:

  • Completing equivalent coursework at the appropriate level. (Courses could be taken at any other institution and then transferred back to Lawrence.)
  • By taking and passing a proficiency examination in the language. (This process may be facilitated locally by the Dean of Student Academic Services.)

In those cases where placement or proficiency tests are not available locally, students shall petition to use another form of evaluation. This evaluation must be administered and certified by an outside authority who will (a) identify his/her expertise in the language, (b) describe the methods by which he/she assessed the proficiency of the student, and (c) provide a diagnostic report on the level of proficiency the student has obtained in the four skills.

Native Speakers

  • The requirements will be waived for international students whose high school program was conducted in a language other than English. They will need to provide documented proof (e.g., high school diploma) verifying that this was indeed the case.
  • Students whose native language is not English must demonstrate proficiency in that native language if their high school program was conducted primarily in English. For written languages, proficiency includes the ability to read and write the language. For languages in which proficiency cannot be assessed by a Lawrence faculty member, students must provide a letter from a person in authority (e.g., headmaster or teacher) who is not a family member, along with any other relevant documentation attesting to the student's proficiency in the language.

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