Seminar Listing by Date

Art and the Cocktail

 

This course is taught in conjunction with Bjorklunden’s Door Kinetic Arts Festival and will include live presentations of dance, theatre and film from nationally renowned artists. The festival, which is in its third season, is designed to expand the range of artistic expressions across different mediums. This course is meant to be a complement to the festival.

It wasn’t long after the first cocktail was created--somewhere in the United States sometime in the early 1800s--that the distinctly American invention and the theater met as friends. Actors have historically been great tipplers, as have playwrights, who have honored their favored elixirs by featuring cocktails, spirits and bars prominently in their works, therefore perpetuating drinking’s role in society. With the dawn of the cinema, the same pattern was perpetuated by screenwriters. Eric Simonson, the Oscar-winning and Tony-nominated filmmaker, playwright and director, and his brother, Robert Simonson, drinks reporter for The New York Times and author of several cocktail books, will examine the symbiotic relationship between alcohol and the arts. This diverting and amusing class will divide its time between plays, films, cocktail demonstrations and maybe even a field trip. (We’re not saying we might go to a bar, but…)

Eric Simonson ’82 is a writer/director for film, television, theater, and opera. Recent films include the documentary, Studs Terkel: Listening to America (Emmy nomination); A Note of Triumph: The Golden Age of Norman Corwin, which won the Oscar for Documentary Short and received a nomination from the International Documentary Association (IDA) for Distinguished Achievement; On Tiptoe: Gentle Steps to Freedom (Oscar nomination, IDA Award, Emmy nomination). All three films subsequently aired on HBO/Cinemax. Other films include Hamlet (co-directed with Campbell Scott) for Hallmark Entertainment, and Killing Reagan for Scott Free Entertainment and National Geographic. Simonson has also written and developed multiple television series for HBO, FX, Starz, TNT, and USA networks. He is currently writing for the Amazon series The Man in the High Castle. Broadway writing credits include the hit play Lombardi, Magic/Bird, and Bronx Bombers, which he also directed.

Robert Simonson writes about cocktails, sprits, bars and bartenders for The New York Times. He is the author of the books The Old-Fashioned, A Proper Drink and the recent 3-Ingredient Cocktails. His writings have also appeared in Imbibe, Whiskey Advocate, Food & Wine, Saveur, Lucky Peach and Punch, where he is a contributing editor. He is the co-author of the cocktail app Modern Classics of the Cocktail Renaissance. He lives in Brooklyn.


Date: 
Sunday, June 10, 2018 to Saturday, June 16, 2018
Fee(s): 
$995 double; $1,350 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Film & Theatre

Listen to the Birds

 

Our goal is to see as many birds as we can find, especially ones you select, in the most beautiful preserves in the county. My goal is to deepen your love and excitement for these amazing creatures and to expose you to a new way of birding where you learn from the birds, not just identify therm. You will also learn field identification skills, bird sounds using a variety of sound tools, techniques for understanding the complex behaviors of birds, and fascinating discoveries that science has made about birds. The emerging importance of conserving and enhancing bird stopover habitats will be shared, as well as some of the results from the breeding bird census that is currently being done throughout Wisconsin, such as birds of greatest conservation need,. You must be able to walk on unpaved trails for distances of two miles over a period of 2 ½ hours.

Don Quintenz has been teaching environmental education since 1967 and came to the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center in 1981. He previously worked with the Milwaukee Public Schools as their environmental specialist for five years, and before that he was with the Wisconsin Humane Society for three years as their environmental educator and the Wisconsin DNR as a resource technician. He is currently the Senior Ecologist at Audubon. The skill Quintenz has that he cherishes the most is his ability to excite and fascinate people about the natural world because of his intimate familiarity with the native flora and fauna.


Date: 
Sunday, June 10, 2018 to Friday, June 15, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450commuter
Topic(s): 
Nature & Earth

Fact or Fantasy: Science for Presidents

 

The President of the United States faces many problems unique to the office.  As Commander and Chief, the President controls a nuclear arsenal, counters international terrorism and protects our borders.  As Chief Executive, s/he must ensure reliable energy, safe food and abundant water.  The President must protect the population from cyberattacks, epidemics and, anthropogenic (man induced) environmental disasters.  S/he must assess whether new technologies, like drones and genetically modified organisms (GMO), may require federal regulations.  Join us as we examine science issues a President must understand to make knowledgeable decisions in an ever-changing technical world.  To quote President Lyndon B. Johnson, “A president’s hardest task is not to do what is right, but to know what is right.”

Jerry Clifford ‘68 graduated from Lawrence with a degree in Physics.  In 1972 he got a PhD in Nuclear Physics from the Institute of Atomic Research at Iowa State University.  He joined the Air Force, taught at the Air Force Academy, worked in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and researched particle beams and high-power microwave in Reagan’s Star Wars.  In the ‘90s, Dr. Clifford examined bomb detection technologies after the Lockerbie PanAm disaster.  Currently he teaches undergraduates physics and astronomy at California State University Channel Islands.  Since 2004, he has also taught senior citizens at CSUCI’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in classes like Sounds of Music, Art & Visual Perception, How Things Work, Science & Conscience, Cosmology and El Nino-La Nina.


Date: 
Sunday, June 17, 2018 to Friday, June 22, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
science

It Depends on Your Frame of Mind

 

This seminar builds upon a similar seminar of 2017, “And We Thought We Were Thinking Rationally”, and digs deeper into the implications of recent cognitive research regarding how we process information.  The seminar will focus on how language and social dynamics frame or shape thought processing. Participants from last year’s seminar and those who have “digested” the book Thinking, Fast and Slow are invited to attend.  Others are invited to consider attending the seminar, “How We Decide” to be held September 9-14.

Roger Johnson is a retired clinical psychologist who worked for Kaiser Permanente, a large healthcare organization in California, as a consultant, manager and clinician.  He has a PhD from Fuller School of Psychology and an MBA from the University of California at Irvine.  His focus for the past several years has been on designing and leading engaging adult workshops regarding psychological dynamics for professionals in the Silicon Valley.

Jerry Camery-Hoggatt, PhD, is an Emeritus Professor, recently retired from Vanguard University.  His teaching portfolio bridges a variety of interdisciplinary interests, all of which connect in one way or another to the topic of our seminar.  His special interest is in the effect of stories and storytelling on our inner journeys.  In addition to being an accomplished storyteller, he is the author of a variety of books in a range of genres, including biblical studies (Reading the Good Book Well: A Guide to Biblical Interpretation) and Christmas stories (When Mother Was Eleven-Foot-Four: A Christmas Memory).


Date: 
Sunday, June 24, 2018 to Friday, June 29, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Psychology

 

James Joyce’s Dubliners: A Reading Group


Few people can boast of really having read and understood James Joyce’s writings. Joyce published his famous collection of fifteen short stories, Dubliners, in 1914, but not before years of struggle with publishers who feared the book was too daring and brutally honest about Ireland and Joyce’s native city, Dublin. The stories are now regarded as masterpieces of storytelling, filled with details of Irish life around 1900 and studded with mysterious meanings, symbols, and allusions. This seminar will combine lively but relaxed group discussion with the instructor’s guidance on Joyce’s life, Irish history, music, and culture, and strategies for unlocking the stories’ meanings. The seminar will conclude with Joyce’s magnificent tale, The Dead, the subject of a musically rich film directed by John Huston, which we will also view.

Required Reading: Dubliners by James Joyce, any complete edition

Robert Spoo ’79 holds an endowed chair in law at the University of Tulsa and is a former English professor and editor of the James Joyce Quarterly. He earned his PhD in English at Princeton University, and his JD at Yale Law School. He has published numerous books and articles on Joyce and other modern authors, including James Joyce and the Language of History: Dedalus’s Nightmare and Without Copyrights: Piracy, Publishing, and the Public Domain, both with Oxford University Press. He has lectured on Joyce throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe, and serves as General Counsel for the International James Joyce Foundation. He was awarded a 2016 Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship to complete his forthcoming book, Modernism and the Law.


Date: 
Sunday, June 24, 2018 to Friday, June 29, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Literature

Wildlife Photography: Turning Passion into Productivity

 

This seminar is designed to increase knowledge and skills in wildlife photography, from field tactics and strategies to aesthetics and image composition. Participants will discover how to use blinds and concealments to get closer to wildlife as well as learn the criteria for a strong photo and tips to make pictures stand out in a sea of “me too” digital images. Van Den Brandt also discusses his favorite and most productive national and international wildlife photography destinations. Class time will be split between lectures and dawn field sessions at local natural areas. Veteran shooters as well as those new to wildlife photography will leave the seminar with new and tangible skills that can be immediately applied toward becoming a more productive photographer.

Required Materials: SLR camera, basic understanding of its operation, and enthusiastic passion for wildlife photography.

John Van Den Brandt is a professional wildlife photographer with more than three decades of photography experience. While successful in wedding, portrait, product and model photography, he has focused solely on wildlife since 1995. Since founding his wildlife photography company, Wild Wind Images LLC in 2007, Van Den Brandt's wildlife images have appeared in numerous articles, websites, textbooks and ads. His framed fine art prints grace the walls of homes and businesses across the country. Van Den Brandt’s presentations are illustrated with his own stunning images, many of which have appeared in his nationally distributed wildlife calendars that have sold more than 100,000 copies. Van Den Brandt makes his home in northeastern Wisconsin with his wife Jean, his “field assistant, muse and co-conspirator in planning an adventurous life."


Date: 
Sunday, June 24, 2018 to Friday, June 29, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
photography

Tritone Jazz Fantasy Camp

 

Enjoy a high-quality, fun, engaging experience for adult jazz musicians and singers of all levels, from beginner to semi-pro. The week’s musical activities include playing and performance opportunities in combos and large ensembles, jazz master classes, jazz improvisation/theory classes, special-topics sessions, individual lessons, open jam sessions and performances with professional jazz artists. Summer 2018 will be Tritone’s 20th consecutive year at Björklunden.

Tritone was co-founded by the late Fred Sturm ’73, Kimberly Clark Professor of Music and director of jazz studies at the Lawrence University Conservatory of Music. It is now run by co-founder Bob DeRosa, a marketing communications consultant and busy part-time bassist in upstate New York. Faculty includes legendary guitarist Gene Bertoncini, recording artist and veteran of the Benny Goodman Orchestra and the NBC Tonight Show Band; trumpeter Terell Stafford of NYC’s Village Vanguard Orchestra and director of jazz studies at Temple University; pianist John Harmon ’57, D.F.A ’05, Lawrence jazz director from 1971 to 1974; drummer Zach Harmon, a busy freelancer and graduate of the Thelonious Monk Jazz Institute;  vocalist Janet Planet, Lawrence instructor of music and renowned Wisconsin jazz/pop vocal soloist; saxophonist Tom Washatka, a busy sideman, producer, and recording engineer; bassist Ike Sturm, music director for the jazz ministry at Manhattan's Saint Peter’s Church (the “Jazz Church”) and a busy freelance bassist in NYC; jazz and classical vocalist Misty Sturm; trombonist Dean Sorenson, director of jazz at the University of Minnesota; and pianist/composer/arranger Rod Blumenau, freelance jazz artist in upstate New York.

To register, contact Bob DeRosa | PO Box 297, Penfield NY, 14526 | 585-377-2222 | bob@tritonejazz.com


Date: 
Sunday, July 8, 2018 to Saturday, July 14, 2018
Fee(s): 
$1,195 tuition and meals; $875 tuition only
Topic(s): 
Music

Can Europe's Center Hold in the Age of Trump?

 

Seminar participants will examine the causes of the continent’s multiple crises, their likely impact on its future and their importance for the U.S.  After briefly reviewing how Europeans restructured their political, economic and military systems beginning in the 1950’s, the seminar will consider internal challenges to unity and cooperation and outside forces that threaten their security.  Focus will be on tensions between the pooled sovereignty of the European Union (EU) and resurgent neo-nationalist and populist politics; the Euro crisis; and Russia’s threat to immediate neighbors and European democratic stability.  Finally, participants will assess the implications for Trans-Atlantic political, economic and security ties of Europe’s uncertain relationship with the Trump administration. A selection of articles to read on the fast-moving situation will be suggested in the spring. The seminar will include optional films for viewing and discussion on one or two evenings.

After graduation from Princeton and Harvard Law School, Jon Greenwald served 30 years in the U.S. Foreign Service, the bulk of it in Europe, including East Berlin as the Wall fell and ending with the Mission to the European Union. He taught diplomacy and foreign policy at Lawrence as the Scarff Professor, 1998-1999, coordinated foreign policy for Bill Bradley’s presidential campaign (2000), then served as vice president of the International Crisis Group, the Brussels based-conflict prevention organization, for 16 years. He has taught frequently at Bjorklunden, including a joint Berlin course (2010) with Becker. He presently leads a project to bring youths from conflict zones – beginning with Israelis and Palestinians – to study together at top U.S. and other prep schools.

Robert (Todd) Becker grew up near Washington, D.C, earned an MA from the University of Minnesota and spent much of the past 50 years in Europe as a US diplomat and international civil servant.   As a diplomat, he concentrated on German affairs, East-West Relations and the European Union.  He served as Deputy Head of Mission of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) in Croatia and Ukraine and Special Assistant to the Lithuanian Chairman of the OSCE.  The Scarf Professor at Lawrence in 2009, Becker teaches at Salisbury University on European Government and the European Union.   He has been an OSCE election monitor in Germany, Byelorussia, Montenegro and Ukraine and is married to Christa Kalinski of Leipzig, Germany.


Date: 
Sunday, July 15, 2018 to Friday, July 20, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
politics

Our Freshwater Future: The Ecology, Economics, and Politics of the Great Lakes

 

The Great Lakes are a globally unique resource containing diverse ecosystems with growing political influence via the freshwater “blue economy”. Our Freshwater Future will take participants on an in-depth exploration of the ecology of the Great Lakes through scientific storytelling. From the formation of the lakes millennia ago to the interactions of native and introduced freshwater organisms today, the seminar will then look to the future of water quality and quantity in changing climatic and political times. The shores of Lake Michigan will provide an ideal setting to meet the organisms that depend on the lakes, from microscopic algae to fourth-generation fishermen. Participants will be fully immersed in the Great Lakes through daily interactive discussions, and optional afternoon fieldtrips to an ecological restoration site and/or local fishery.

Required Reading: The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan. W. W. Norton & Company, 2017. ISBN: 978-0-393-24643-8

Peter Levi ‘01 is a graduate of Lawrence and started his career in freshwater ecology alongside Seilheimer (’00) in 1999 during Bart DeStasio’s (’83) limnology course. Currently, he is an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Sustainability at Drake University (Des Moines, IA) where he teaches courses in freshwater science, leads the Stream Ecosystem Ecology Lab, and conducts local and regional outreach. His research addresses the health and water quality of streams flowing through human-dominated landscapes, such as urban and agricultural watersheds. Prior to Drake, Levi studied Great Lakes tributaries while at UW-Madison and the University of Notre Dame. Some of his most fond memories from Lawrence are Septembers at Bjorklunden during cross country season.

Titus Seilheimer ‘00 is a graduate of Lawrence and it was there that his love of aquatic ecology and limnology developed into the dream of a career. He is currently a fisheries specialist with Wisconsin Sea Grant where he leads research, outreach, and education activities around Great Lakes fisheries and ecosystems. Seilheimer has spent nearly 100 days on Lake Michigan commercial fishing boats. His past research took him to all five Great Lakes and the Great Plains in wetlands, streams, and springs. Seilheimer enjoyed his times at Lawrence, especially class trips to Bjorklunden, and returned to the Bjorklunden chapel in 2003 to marry fellow Lawrence biology major Amy Fettes (‘99).


Date: 
Sunday, July 15, 2018 to Friday, July 20, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
politics & science

Pilgrimage in Medieval Europe

 

During the Middle Ages pilgrimage was a major activity.  Each year huge crowds of people, from the peasantry to royalty, followed the pilgrimage routes throughout Europe.  Encouraged by the Church, some traveled great distances to the Holy Land, Rome, and Santiago de Compostela, while others visited local sites seeking saints’ shrines and the relics of the holy dead.  Their motives varied from sacred quests for miraculous cures to opportunities for adventure and a change of scenery.  This seminar will explore the concept and experience of pilgrimage, travel in the Middle Ages, saints’ shrines and miracles, and the practice of stealing relics.  It will discuss the impact of pilgrimage on the economics, culture, art and architecture of the period, and look at a number of fascinating pilgrimage centers—egs. Conques, Canterbury and Chartres.  Its special focus will be on the extremely popular route (of the Middle Ages and still today) to Santiago de Compostela and its lovely Romanesque pilgrimage churches.

Required Reading: Pilgrimage in the Middle Ages: A Reader by Brett Edward Whalen. University of Toronto Press, 2011. ISBN: 144260199X

Optional Reading: The Pilgrim’s Guide to Santiago de Compostela by William Melczer. Italica Press, 2008. ISBN: 0934977259

Jane Tibbetts Schulenburg ’65 (Ph.D., UW-Madison) is professor emerita of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she taught in the Department of Liberal Arts and Applied Studies, the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, and the Medieval Studies Program.  Her areas of specialization include medieval social and religious history, medieval women’s history, women saints, female monasticism, gender and sacred space, and medieval embroidery.  She is the author of numerous studies on medieval women, including her major work, Forgetful of Their Sex: Female Sanctity and Society, ca. 500-1100 (University of Chicago Press, 1998/2000).  She is presently working on a book on gender, sacred space and materiality in the Middle Ages.  Schulenburg is the recipient of a number of research fellowships and was recognized with Lawrence’s Lucia Briggs Distinguished Achievement Award in 2001 and the University of Wisconsin-Madison Van Hise Teaching Award in 2013.  Over the years she organized and led 39 University of Wisconsin medieval study tours to Europe.


Date: 
Sunday, July 15, 2018 to Friday, July 20, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
History

 

Lyndon Johnson: An American Life

 

This is seminar has met its lodging maximum and is currently open for commuter registrations only. Please call 920-839-2216 with any questions or to join the waiting list. 


Lyndon Baines Johnson was one of the most prominent politicians in 20th-century American history. Born in Stonewall, Texas in 1908, Johnson grew interested in politics very early in his life, and Franklin Roosevelt became his role model. Initially a member of the United States House of Representatives, LBJ would be best known as the Senate majority leader over the course of the 1950s. He is considered the most effective Senate majority leaders in all of American history. In 1960, Johnson would be asked by the Kennedy campaign to join the Democratic ticket. Following the assassination of John Kennedy in 1963, Lyndon Johnson became the 36th President of the United States. He was arguably the best prepared of any president to take the oval office. LBJ’s War on Poverty and Great Society programs also reflected his dedication to the American people. Unfortunately, the Vietnam War would prove disastrous for his presidency and political career. Historians view Lyndon Johnson as a successful, but controversial politician in the present day.

Required Reading: Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream by Doris Kearns Goodwin. St. Martin’s Griffin, 1991. ISBN: 0312060270

Tim Crain is the director of the National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education and an assistant professor of history at Seton Hill University in Pennsylvania. He received a PhD in modern Europe and modern Jewish history at Arizona State University after receiving a BA and MA from Marquette University. His areas of specialization include modern Jewish history, comparative religious history, modern Europe and the modern Middle East. Crain taught history for 15 years at Marquette University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has received numerous distinguished teaching awards from the University of Wisconsin System and Marquette University. He has instructed over 20 seminars of Bjorklunden, and Tim and his family always look forward to their time there each summer.


Date: 
Sunday, July 22, 2018 to Friday, July 27, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
History

 

Memories of Soviet Life and Death: Svetlana Alexievich’s Secondhand Time

 

This is seminar has met its lodging maximum and is currently open for commuter registrations only. Please call 920-839-2216 with any questions or to join the waiting list.


This seminar will explore the origins of today’s Russia, the Russia of Putin, by immersing itself in the history and culture of Gorbachev’s collapsing Soviet Union, as well as the society that emerged it its wake.  Participants will read memories, interviews, and works of literature devoted to the experience of that catastrophe, and will have opportunities to watch films and listen to music of the time.  The center of the seminar will be 2015 Nobel-prize winning Svetlana Alexievich’s Secondhand Time, a controversial and enigmatic work that combines journalism with novelistic orchestration. 

Required Reading: Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets by Svetlana Alexievich, translated by Bela Sayevich. Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2017. ISBN: 978-0399588822

Peter Thomas has been teaching Russian language and culture in the Russian Department at Lawrence University since 2006.  Before coming to Lawrence, he taught courses in comparative literature, and in Russian language, culture, and film, at Northwestern University, Beloit College, and St. Olaf College.  Since arriving at Lawrence, Thomas has received the Young Teacher Award (2013) and the Freshman Studies Teaching Award (2015).  This is his eighth summer seminar at Bjorklunden.


Date: 
Sunday, July 22, 2018 to Friday, July 27, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Literature

 

Wisconsin Jazz


When music and Wisconsin are mentioned in the same sentence, one might expect polka to follow, or rock and roll, or even Liberace.  Wisconsin, however, has a rich heritage in jazz.  Two of the great figures of the Swing Era, Bunny Berigan and Woody Herman, were natives of Wisconsin.  Wisconsin musicians have contributed to the life of jazz ever since on both coasts, and in Europe. Wisconsin continues to produce such stars of the jazz scene as Brian Lynch, Carl Allen and Geoffrey Keezer.  There is also a vital jazz scene within the state:  in Milwaukee, Madison, the Fox Valley, the Eau Claire area, and spilling over into Chicago, Minneapolis-St. Paul and elsewhere.  Kurt Dietrich interviewed over 100 musicians for his new book, Wisconsin Riffs:  Jazz Profiles from the Heartland.  The lives and music of many of these musicians will be explored in this seminar.

Required Reading: Wisconsin Riffs: Jazz Profiles from the Heartland by Kurt Dietrich. Wisconsin Historical Society Press, 2018.

Kurt Dietrich '73 is Professor of Music and Barbara Baldwin DeFrees Professor of Performing Arts at Ripon College, where he has taught since 1980. At Ripon Dietrich directs the Symphonic Wind Ensemble and the Jazz Ensemble, teaches brass instruments and a variety of courses.  Dietrich has degrees from Lawrence University, Northwestern University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he earned his doctorate. He was trombonist with Matrix, with which he recorded for RCA, Warner Brothers, Pablo and Summit Records.  He remains an active player in both jazz and classical groups, and has been principal trombone in the Wisconsin Symphonic Winds since its founding. Dietrich is the author of three books, and has also contributed to numerous journals and other publications.


Date: 
Sunday, July 22, 2018 to Friday, July 27, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Music

 

New Topics in Lincoln Studies

 

This is seminar has met its lodging maximum and is currently open for commuter registrations only. Please call 920-839-2216 with any questions or to join the waiting list.


This seminar will address some of the many themes, big and small, which the previous three seminars on Lincoln have not mentioned, or barely noticed.  These include mid-Victorian anthropology and how Lincoln may have understood it; new evidence about the famed condolence letter to Mrs. Bixby; the murder mystery that Lincoln wrote; how and why the demographics of Washington, D.C. were altered by the Civil War; and the ever-changing views and news about Mary Lincoln -- among other topics.  No previous reading or attendance in these Lincoln seminars is required.  As in 2017, one part of a class period will be shared with Terry Moran’s class, this year for a comparison of Lincoln’s Supreme Court nominees and Donald Trump’s nominee(s).

James M. Cornelius ‘81, a native of Minneapolis, was educated at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisc. and at the University of Illinois – Urbana.  He has been an editor and writer in New York City and a visiting assistant professor at the U of I Library.  Since 2007 he has been Curator of the Lincoln Collection at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, in Springfield, Illinois.  Most recently he edited and co-authored the Official Commemorative Guide to the Presidential Museum (2011; reprinted 2013); oversaw publication and introduced Gettysburg Replies (2015), a showcase of original short essays about Lincoln or current affairs by 100 famous people; and co-authored Under His Hat: 100 Great Lincoln Items (2016).


Date: 
Sunday, July 29, 2018 to Friday, August 3, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
History

 

The Trump Revolution

 

This is seminar has met its lodging maximum and is currently open for commuter registrations only. Please call 920-839-2216 with any questions or to join the waiting list.


America is different because of the presidency of Donald Trump. Whether he succeeds or fails in enacting his populist, “America First” program, Trump has changed the nature of our politics, the direction of domestic policy, and the role of America in the world. Drawing on his own statements, tweets and actions; on the work of the departments and agencies of the federal government under his direction; and on his major foreign policy decisions, this seminar will take a serious and substantive look at one of the most consequential leaders in US history: Donald Trump.

Terry Moran ’82 is ABC News’ chief foreign correspondent and an anchor for the network. He is based in London and has led the program’s distinguished coverage of the major news stories in the last several years. Before relocating overseas, Moran was an anchor for Nightline, World News, and other ABC News broadcasts. Moran is also a print journalist who has written for many publications, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the New Republic Magazine – where he began his career in journalism.


Date: 
Sunday, July 29, 2018 to Friday, August 3, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
politics

 

And That’s The Truth! 


Philosophy is defined as the love of wisdom.  Its primary aim is the search for truth.  But, what is truth?  Philosophical theories abound!  At one extreme is the view that there is no such thing as truth, which, if true, is false!  At the other extreme is the theory that there is such a thing as truth, but it cannot be attained, which, if true, we would never know!  Between these two extremes philosophers have developed four significant theories of truth: the Correspondence, Coherence, Pragmatic, and Authoritarian theories.  The Correspondence theory proposes that a proposition is true if it corresponds with the facts, that truth is grounded by an objective reality, independent of what we believe.  The Coherence theory proposes that all we need is consistency among accepted beliefs at any given time, and that truth does not depend on an external reality. The Pragmatic theory suggests that truth is a matter of “what works,” what is beneficial to believe, thus context, intent and outcome are important, and facts and consistency are essentially irrelevant.  The Authoritarian theory proclaims that truth is a matter of what the reigning authority says is true, because the authority “defines” what is true, regardless of facts or personal beliefs.  Religion comes to mind here, but also totalitarianism.  These four theories of truth cannot all be true.  In fact, they may all be false.  Sign up and find out!  Join Terry for a fast-paced, fun-filled week seeking the truth!  (No prior background in philosophy required.)

Suggested Readings: Students should Google “philosophical theories of truth” and read any and all entries!

Terry Goode received his Ph.D. in philosophy from Wayne State University.  He has taught philosophy at the University of South Carolina, UW-Fox Valley, and UW-Oshkosh.  He regularly teaches philosophy for the Clearing in the winter and for Bjorklunden in the summer.  Prior to his retirement in 2007 Terry owned and managed two technology companies; and was a senior technology officer and served as a business consultant to a number of firms in the Fox River Valley.  He and his wife, Pamela, are retired in Baileys Harbor and are active volunteers in many Door County organizations.


Date: 
Sunday, August 5, 2018 to Friday, August 10, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Philosophy & Theology

Apocalypse – When?


From Biblical prophecies to the stirring final chorus in Handel's Messiah, from dreams of the "rapture" to The Late, Great Planet Earth and Apocalypse Now, from comic strips to TV series, the idea of “apocalypse” (the uncovering of the End Times) stretches for millennia across art and literature of every sort.  Recent scenarios of worldwide nuclear destruction, environmental implosion, and even the zombie apocalypse, continue to conjure up an impending Doomsday.  This seminar will focus on apocalyptic writing in the Bible: Old Testament prophecies dealing with the Day of the Lord, visions of the End Times and the New Age in Daniel and Ezekiel, and, especially, the New Testament's Apocalypse of Jesus Christ, popularly known as the Book of Revelation.  A readers' theatre presentation of Wolf Mankowitz's spoof of the prophet Jonah's message, "The end of the world is at hand!," will offer entertaining comic relief. 

Required Reading: A Bible, any edition

Bill Urbrock is honorary Rosebush Professor emeritus of Religious Studies at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, where he taught Biblical Studies and Ancient Near Eastern Religions.  He has presented courses, seminars, and lecture series for a variety of civic and educational groups, including Bjorklunden.

Peery Duderstadt taught at DePaul University in the English Department and the Humanities Division where he offered a course entitled “Doomsday Literature: The Apocalyptic Genre”. He is an ordained deacon in the Catholic Church serving in the Archdiocese of Chicago, and former Coordinator of Adult Faith Formation at Our Lady of the Brook in Northbrook, IL. He is an active member of the Biblical Archaeological Society and a regular attendee at Björklunden seminars.


Date: 
Sunday, August 5, 2018 to Friday, August 10, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
History

 

Baseball Lit: The Best Writing on Our National Game


Baseball is America’s “writer’s game.” No sport has a more powerful hold on our literary imagination, and none has produced more great literature. In this course we will learn how the best writing on our National Pastime has given substance to the scholar Jacques Barzun’s famous remark that “whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball.” Books we will read and discuss include The Glory of Their Times, The Boys of Summer, and Eight Men Out, along with the work of John Updike, Red Smith, and Vin Scully.

Required Readings: The Glory of Their Times by Lawrence Ritter. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2010. ISBN: 0061994715
The Boys of Summer by Roger Kahn. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. ISBN: 0060883960
Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series by Eliot Asinof. Holt Paperbacks, 2000. ISBN: 0805065377

Jerald Podair is Robert S. French Professor of American Studies and professor of history at Lawrence University. He is the author of the recently published City of Dreams: Dodger Stadium and the Birth of Modern Los Angeles, the story of how the heated battle over the construction of America’s first modern ballpark between 1957 and 1962 helped create the Los Angeles we know today. The author or co-author of five books and a fellow of the New York Academy of History, he has been honored by the Society of American Historians for “literary distinction in the writing of history” and by Lawrence University with its Award for Excellence in Scholarship.


Date: 
Sunday, August 5, 2018 to Friday, August 10, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Culture & Sports

Photography Now!


Many of us remember (and loved) when photography involved film and darkrooms.  But today, most of us have converted to (and embraced) the new age of digital images.  This seminar will explore that world.  Students will be encouraged to use either their digital or smart phone cameras. We will look at contemporary fine art photographers for inspiration.  Daily assignments and field trips will be given to stimulate your imagination.  There will be an optional evening Door County photo shoot, to discover the magic of night photography.  Instruction will be given on using the simple photo editing already on your computer (both for Mac and PC) to enhance your images.  If you have Photoshop or Lightroom, you may use that instead.  We will also look at photo apps for your smart phone.  Participants will use a pigmented ink jet printer to make professional enlargements of their work.  This class is designed for both the beginner as well as those who have a more advanced understanding of their camera and photo editing.

Suggested Materials: Any digital camera (DSLR to Smartphone), a computer for photo editing, a USB flash drive, and a simple tripod.

Philip Krejcarek is a Professor of Art at Carroll University where he has taught the past 41 years.  He has also taught photography classes at Ghost Ranch in New Mexico.  He is delighted to be returning for his fifteenth photography seminar at Bjørklunden.  He is the author of the book, An Introduction to Digital Imaging.  His work has been displayed in national exhibitions and has been included in collections at the Milwaukee Art Museum, The Denver Art Museum, Wustum Museum of Fine Arts and the Haggerty Museum of Art.


Date: 
Sunday, August 12, 2018 to Saturday, August 18, 2018
Fee(s): 
$995 double; $1,350 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
photography

 

The Music and Times of Bach, Mozart and Beethoven

 

This is seminar has met its lodging maximum and is currently open for commuter registrations only. Please call 920-839-2216 with any questions or to join the waiting list.

 

This class will study the life and times of three of the greatest composers of the western world: Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. We will begin by looking at the cultural history of the Renaissance through the Romantic periods (1500-1900) and discover how these composers captured the values of these periods in their music. To communicate with each composer, it is essential to understand the times he lived in, his personality, and his unique genius in using the elements of music. We will augment the course with examples of paintings of the periods as we discover the essence of the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods.

Optional Reading: How to Listen to Great Music by Robert Greenberg. Plume, 2011. ISBN: 978045229708

Mark Aamot directed the choral program at Carroll University for 27 years. He served as chairman of the music department for 10 of those years. He also taught courses preparing teachers. One of his favorite courses was called “Music and Ideas in Western Culture.” He has travelled over 30 times to Europe leading his college choir, community choirs and alumni groups to the great cultural centers of Europe.  Aamot received his BA in music education from St. Olaf College and his doctorate from Arizona State University. He started the Waukesha Choral Union and the Jubilate Chorale and has conducted many of the masterworks of Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. Since his retirement in 2001 Aamot has led several European trips overseas.


Date: 
Sunday, August 12, 2018 to Saturday, August 18, 2018
Fee(s): 
$995 double; $1,350 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Music

Watercolor: The Expressive Medium

 

This is seminar has met its participant maximum. Please call 920-839-2216 with any questions or to join the waiting list.

 

This seminar is for novice through experienced artists. Drawing skills are useful but not required. Participants will be a part of a creative community that invites them to experiment with a wide-range of traditional and non-traditional watercolor techniques and learn to create strong individualized artistic statements. Participants from previous summers are welcome to repeat this class and are welcome to focus on independent projects or work with the instructor to figure out next steps. 

Helen Klebesadel was a member of the Lawrence University faculty from 1990 to 2000 teaching studio art and gender studies. She has offered her summer Björklunden watercolor seminars annually since 1996.  Known as an engaging teacher and effective creative coach, she has been invited to teach watercolor and creativity workshops from Texas to Alaska. Klebesadel is best known for her highly detailed narrative watercolor paintings and exhibits her paintings nationally and internationally while maintaining her art studio in Madison, WI.  She also holds a position as the director of the University of Wisconsin Women’s and Gender Studies Consortium at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  Committed to community engagement, Klebesadel served on the Wisconsin Arts Board from 2006-2013, and she is a past national president of the national Women’s Caucus for Art.  Learn more about her artwork, her collaborative activist art projects, and her exhibition schedule at www.klebesadel.com.

Class maximum: 17

Suggested Materials:

  • One set tube watercolors - an ideal range of colors would include:
    • permanent or alizarin red
    • cadmium red
    • ultramarine blue
    • cerulean blue
    • new gambage yellow
    • lemon yellow
    • violet or mauve
    • For this workshop student grade watercolors are fine.  Good brands of paint are Winsor Newton (Cotman), Grumbacher, Daniel Smith, Holman, Liquitex, M. Graham, Holbine, and many others. 
  • A range of at least four brushes:
    • ROUNDS #10 or 8 for large areas, #5 or 6 for basic work,#1 or 2 for details,
    • FLATS #2 or 1-inch flat for washes
    • Any size fan brush (optional)
  • 5-8 sheets good watercolor paper (preferably bring some full sheets of some good paper like Arches 140 lb 22 x 30 inch paper, but a good 20 x 28 watercolor pad can work.  Cold press or hot press paper will work.  Bring some of each.)
  • Two water containers (quart containers)
  • A white plate, enamel butchers tray, or watercolor palette
  • 3-6 small ½ to 1-cup sized cups/bowls or baby food jars
  • A roll of masking tape
  • Liquid mask (Winsor Newton, Frisket, Misket)
  • Metal nib and ink pen holder

Optional Materials:

  • A small plastic spray bottle with adjustable nozzle
  • A 4x6” absorbent sponge + a smaller one
  • Paper Towels
  • Sketchbook and Pencils, B & softer or a #2
  • An eraser, Art Gum or Kneaded
  • A rubber cement pick up (found at office supply stores
  • Any additional supplies you enjoy working with.

You can get almost everything via one of these two online art stores, much of it at discount:
www.dickblick.com
www.jerrysartarama.com

Helen Klebesadel will bring a lot of supplies too so you can try things out and see if you like them before investing in them.  The most important purchases are your paint, brushes and paper.  Good quality supplies are expensive initially as you get set up, but if you purchase good enough quality materials you will have much greater expense in your experimentation with watercolor. Please do not hesitate to check in with Helen if you have questions about what to purchase. Helen’s email is klebesadel@tds.net.


Date: 
Sunday, August 12, 2018 to Saturday, August 18, 2018
Fee(s): 
$995 double; $1,350 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Art & Art History

Journey to the East: Crusading in the Middle Ages

 

No image from the Middle Ages may be as lasting as that of a knight riding to battle, and no set of battles characterize the period more than the crusades.  This course will examine the phenomenon of crusading as it played out from 1097 until roughly 1300.  The class will begin by explaining what the various scholarly opinions of what crusades are.  Then, the origins of crusading will be explored.  Next, over several days, each of the first four crusades will be examined in depth, with particular attention to how and why they began, the events of each, and their results and consequences.  Finally, the class will shift focus to the implications of medieval crusading to the modern world.  The readings for the course will be both primary and secondary sources, which will enlighten the discussions of the major themes of the class.

Required Reading: An Introduction to the Crusades by S.J. Allen. Toronto University Press, 2017.
ISBN: 978-1-4426-0023-2

Nikolas O. Hoel ’99 is an instructor of history at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, Illinois.  He is graduate of Lawrence University who went on to earn a MA at the University of Colorado-Boulder and a Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He is trained in both medieval and Byzantine history.  At NEIU he teaches classes concerning both ancient and medieval Europe, for which he has been honored with an Instructor Excellent Award.  Hoel’s primary research interests concern the religious, cultural, and intellectual history of the Middle Ages, including but not limited to saints’ lives, monasticism, and the crusades.


Date: 
Sunday, August 19, 2018 to Friday, August 24, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
History

Speech Attacks: Bullshit, Lies, Propaganda, Silencing

 

While we clearly use language to convey information, there are many other acts we perform with language as well. This course is an examination of some of the other things we do with language. We will start with a discussion of John Austin’s seminal, 1962 work How to Do Things with Words, to introduce the basics of speech act theory. We will then devote each of the remaining four days to investigating one type of pernicious speech act. Questions will include: What is bullshit and how does it benefit the bullshiter? What are the roles of intention and implication in lying? How does propaganda engender dehumanization of others and the deindividuation of the self? And how can speech serve to silence—that is, stymie the expressive force of—disempowered speakers? We will look at what some of the best contemporary philosophers and social scientists have had to say about these topics. And we will pay special attention to contemporary examples of speech attacks in politics and popular culture.

Required Reading: How to Do Things with Words by J.L. Austin. Harvard University Press, 1975. ISBN: 0674411528

Mark Phelan is an associate professor of philosophy and chair of the philosophy department at Lawrence University in Wisconsin. A regular contributor to the cognitive science program at Lawrence, Mark has published in numerous journals in philosophy and cognitive science on topics in the philosophy of mind, speech acts, aesthetics, and linguistic pragmatics. His topics of research interest include figurative language, how we talk about art, how we think about minds, and the normative structure of relationships.


Date: 
Sunday, August 19, 2018 to Friday, August 24, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Politics & History

The Niagara Escarpment, Geotourism, Developing Countries, and Cultural & Natural Heritage: How does it all relate?


This seminar will explore the evolving concepts of ‘geotourism’ and sustainability and what they really mean, as well as the complexities involved in managing the world’s heritage both locally and globally. There are very timely issues related to saving heritage resources that are affected by development, war, neglect, environmental changes, and natural disasters. Participants will delve into these concepts and examine the inherent challenges with saving irreplaceable global heritage, especially where money, political will, awareness, or the knowledge needed to preserve them may be lacking. The seminar will also take a look at current geotourism projects underway along the Niagara Escarpment in Wisconsin and Door County that aim to preserve the fascinating heritage defined by this 1,000+ mile long geological formation. Class time will include site visits to local geotourism destinations and carpooling will be required. Dress for the weather and be prepared for some walking on uneven terrain.

Susan Kennedy is an adjunct lecturer at Lawrence University (2017) and has traveled the globe working as a heritage and tourism specialist in developing countries for international development agencies including USAID, World Bank, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and others. Kennedy taught a course in Public History Management and continues her work in Door County on projects related to geotourism, the Niagara Escarpment, and sustainable tourism.

Bob Bultman is a geologist, naturalist, and an environmentally active resident of Baileys Harbor. Bultman has an in-depth knowledge of Door County’s natural heritage and is an active member of the Forest Recovery Project, Niagara Escarpment Resource Network and Greater Escarpment Organization. He also teaches at The Clearing and for Road Scholar.


Date: 
Sunday, August 19, 2018 to Friday, August 24, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Nature & Earth Science

Hollywood in Transition: Tracing the Evolution of Classic Films into the Modern Era

 

This is seminar has met its lodging maximum and is currently open for commuter registrations only. Please call 920-839-2216 with any questions or to join the waiting list.

 

Within the two decades of the 1960's and 1970's, Hollywood film production underwent significant stylistic and substantive transition. Hastened by the proliferation of television viewing, the decline of the studio system, and the advent of major advances in technology, the film industry turned to more adult themes, a new generation of national and international film stars, an increased reliance on color and widescreen releases, and a new roster of social issues appropriate to the era. Additional influences in this exciting transitional period included the demise of the Motion Picture Production Code, the national discourse on the role of the individual in society, and the consequences of American involvement in the Vietnam War.  Against this dynamic background of social and technological forces, Hollywood films of genuine artistic quality often struggled to come to the screen.  Yet the era produced a rather large number of "Modern Classics" whose reputations have endured through several decades.  The seminar will focus on this vibrant transitional period of Hollywood filmmaking, with special attention to some of the best pictures and performances of the era.

Jack Rhodes received his Ph.D. in English literature from the University of Texas at Austin and later became interested in communication and film studies.  His principal academic assignments were at Colorado College, the University of Utah, and Miami University (Ohio), where he taught the graduate course on Rhetoric of Film for several years.  Rhodes also served as chair of the Department of Communication at Miami and retired as executive director of Miami's regional campus in Hamilton, Ohio.  He is the author of three books and several scholarly articles and has recently concentrated his research and lecturing on the rhetoric of film genres.  This will be his tenth year teaching Björklunden seminars.


Date: 
Sunday, August 26, 2018 to Friday, August 31, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
film

 

Jane Austen’s Persuasion


This seminar will be a perfect choice for anyone who has ever wondered why Jane Austen is such a big deal.  The seminar will focus on Austen’s last completed novel.  This is the book that many scholars (and the instructor) consider to be her best.  Unlike Austen’s more famous works, Persuasion focuses on older, more settled characters.  (The heroine is in her late twenties, and she’s convinced that love and life have passed her by.)  This book has a happy ending – don’t worry about that – but the really interesting question is how Austen gets us there.  How does she rescue her heroine from a life of disappointment and regret?  And what insights (moral, psychological, social, and political) does she offer to her readers along the way?  Participants will learn about Austen’s life and times, and they’ll also have a chance to think about how literary works are adapted for the screen.  By the end of the week, with any luck, participants should have gained a clearer sense of what makes Austen such a brilliant and influential writer.

Required Reading: Persuasion by Jane Austen, any edition. The instructor recommends Penguin, Oxford World’s Classics, and Norton Critical editions.

Tim Spurgin teaches at Lawrence University, where he’s Associate Professor of English and the Bonnie Glidden Buchanan Professor of English Literature.  He went to college in Minnesota (at Carleton) and earned his Ph.D. in Virginia (at UVa).  Since coming to teach at Lawrence in the fall of 1990, he has taught works by Jane Austen many, many times – always with great enthusiasm.  At Lawrence, he has received the Young Teacher Award (1993), the Freshman Studies Teaching Prize (1994), and the Award for Excellence in Teaching (2014).  He has also presented two courses in the Great Courses series:  The English Novel (2006) and The Art of Reading (2009).  Both of those courses, needless to say, also feature examples from the work of Jane Austen.


Date: 
Sunday, August 26, 2018 to Friday, August 31, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Literature

 

Looking Beyond the Embargo: Art and Visual Culture in Cuba Since 1959


Since Fidel Castro’s 1959 Revolution the visual arts have enjoyed a special status in Cuba. State support for arts institutions is robust and artists are less likely to be censored than writers, enabling them to make bolder statements about social and political issues on the island. This seminar will explore major themes in Cuban art, cinema, and visual culture since 1959, including the persistent promise of utopia, migration, state surveillance, and urban deterioration. Close attention will be paid to visual representations of Cuba’s relationship with the USSR and the tragic results of its demise, the Special Period in a Time of Peace; the iconography of Afro-Cuban religious practice; the enduring figures of José Martí and el Che in public art and propaganda; and the impact of changing diplomatic relations between the US and Cuba on art production and distribution. A few optional film screenings will take place in the afternoons.

Beth A. Zinsli ’02 is the Director and Curator of the Wriston Art Galleries and Assistant Professor of Art History at Lawrence University, which is also her alma mater. She received her Ph.D. in art history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2014. Her graduate work focused on the medium of photography as a system of visual and aesthetic representation within the context of the contemporary Spanish Caribbean and its U.S. Diasporas, which enabled her to visit Havana twice for research.


Date: 
Sunday, August 26, 2018 to Friday, August 31, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Art & Art History

Ekphrastic Poetry:  Writing Poems Inspired by the Other Lively Arts

 

When a poet visits an outstanding art gallery, or attends a performance of a memorable play or concert, it’s a very good bet that he or she will be inspired to write a poem about the experience.  Poems that are generated in this firsthand way are often called ekphrastic—a Greek term that means “a telling out”—and have been widely read and appreciated  for centuries, including the current one. They typically represent a poet’s personal response to a specific work of art from another genre—usually from the visual domains of painting and sculpture, but often from music, dance or theater.

This seminar can be viewed as a spontaneous, “de-regulated” excursion into writing some genuinely inventive poetry. It will begin on the first day with a close look at some surefire strategies that have been used, with amazing success, by poets of the past.  Then, with the help of some irresistible prompts from the other disciplines (including at least one visit to a notable Door County art gallery), participants will start creating ekphrastic poems of their own—one poem per day.  The majority of class-time will then be spent sharing and discussing these newly-inspired ekphrastic works in a supportive workshop setting,

To sum up: this week-long creative adventure will provide imaginative poets with a rare opportunity to transform non-literary works of art into artful words on paper, and to share them— not only with with their fellow workshoppers, but with the rest of the world as well.

Marilyn L. Taylor holds an MA in linguistics and a PhD in creative writing from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Formerly the Poet Laureate of the state of Wisconsin and the city of Milwaukee, she is the author of eight collections of poetry, most recently Step on a Crack (Kelsay Books, 2016).  Her work has appeared in many anthologies and journals, including Poetry, Able Muse, Measure, and the Random House anthology titled Villanelles. Taylor has been awarded First Place in a number of national and international poetry contests, and recently received the Margaret Reid Award from Winning Writers for verse in traditional forms.  Currently a resident of Madison, Taylor facilitates independent poetry workshops, readings, and presentations locally, statewide, and elsewhere.


Date: 
Sunday, September 9, 2018 to Friday, September 14, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Poetry & Writing

How We Decide


Do decisions made by friends or family members sometimes make you wonder. . .?  Have you ever scratched your head about some decision that you’ve made?  Why aren’t we always rational?  The quality of our lives depends upon a variety of decisions that we make—interpersonal, financial, political, moral, and lots more—but is our thinking always logical?  This seminar, building on recent findings in cognitive science, will develop some key foundational insights regarding human decision-making.  People learn best through interactions; come prepared to join enlivened discussions by reading How We Decide by Jonah Lehrer prior to the seminar.

Required Reading: How We Decide by Jonah Lehrer. Mariner Books, 2010. ISBN: 0547247990

Roger Johnson is a retired clinical psychologist who worked for Kaiser Permanente, a large healthcare organization in California, as a consultant, manager and clinician.  He has a PhD from Fuller School of Psychology and an MBA from the University of California at Irvine.  His focus for the past several years has been on designing and leading engaging adult workshops regarding psychological dynamics for professionals in the Silicon Valley.


Date: 
Sunday, September 9, 2018 to Friday, September 14, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Psychology

Television’s Golden Age: Mid-'50s to Late-'70s—From Its Roots in Radio, to Roots…and Beyond


Through screenings and discussion, we'll explore the most influential medium of the past 3/4 century: from TV's radio ancestry, into its early landmark achievements (Rod Serling's "Patterns" and "The Twilight Zone"), through the '60s “Rural Era” ("The Andy Griffith Show"; "The Rifleman"), through "M*A*S*H" and the early-'70s shows of Norman Lear ("All in the Family"; "Maude") and Mary Tyler Moore (her eponymous show; "Lou Grant"), into the historic miniseries "Roots", and beyond. TV's first quarter-century was a Golden Age indeed; while mining that gold, we'll study how the medium's first generation mirrored, critiqued, and impacted American history. We'll close with a glimpse of “the future”—David Lynch's early-'90s "Twin Peaks", the '90s–'00s Cable Revolution ("The Sopranos"), and the current Online-Content Era ("The Handmaid's Tale")—that places Classic TV in cultural/historical context.
NOTE: If available, Paul's friend Ed Asner (seven-time Emmy winner; “Lou Grant” in two acclaimed series, 1970–82; Roots actor) will join us in a live Skype conversation.

Required Readings: The Twilight Zone Companion: Second Edition by Marc Scott Zicree. Silman-James Press, 1992. ISBN: 1-879505-09-6
Note: Reading of the 156 individual episode descriptions is not required.

"Lou Grant": The Making of TV's Top Newspaper Drama by Douglass K. Daniel. Syracuse University Press, 1996. ISBN: 0-8156-0363-0
Note: Reading of the 114 individual episode descriptions is not required.

Paul McComas ’83 has won international filmmaking awards, plus a national prize for the adapted screenplay of his novel "Unplugged", in development as a feature film; another novel has been optioned. Paul has authored six critically acclaimed books of fiction, is under contract for a scholarly media book, and reviews movies and books for the "Milwaukee Shepherd Express". He's taught media, writing, and literature up through the Master's level, garnering teaching prizes at Northwestern and National-Louis Universities, and now teaches at the University of Chicago. Paul serves on the National Leadership Council of the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network—a key organizational partner in his nonprofit Dayna Clay Project targeting rape and suicide. He's received awards from the Mental Health Association, the Medical College of Wisconsin, and the Wisconsin State Senate. Visit www.paulmccomas.com.


Date: 
Sunday, September 9, 2018 to Friday, September 14, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Television & Film

The United States and Europe:  Coming Closer Together, or Parting Ways?


In the aftermath of World War II, the United States and Europe built, together, a liberal world order.  Its hallmarks were representative democracy, free trade, and a rules-based international system.  The liberal world order brought prosperity and stability, led by institutions such as the United Nations, the World Bank, and NATO.  In the past decade, however, power has shifted sharply eastward.  China, India, and other Asian states are flexing new economic and military might.  Political trends in many countries are moving toward authoritarianism.  Western countries face challenges of globalization that include outsourcing of jobs, migration, terrorism, and populism in their domestic politics.  Are these challenges, shared by the U.S. and Europe, bringing unity across the Atlantic?  Or is the Transatlantic community fracturing, due to diverging views of the liberal world order, and contrasts in social cultures at home?    

Optional Readings: A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order by Richard Haas. Penguin Press, 2017. ISBN: 987-0-399-562-36-5

The Retreat of Western Liberalism by Edward Luce. Atlantic Monthly Press, 2017. ISBN: 978-14087-104-18

Christopher Murray, ’75, recently concluded a 40-year career in the United States Foreign Service.  His assignments included service as the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of the Congo, Political Advisor to the Supreme Allied Commander for NATO Forces in Europe, and Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Mission to the European Union in Brussels.  He was also posted in Lebanon, Algeria, Syria, Tunisia, Jamaica, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.  His assignments at the State Department in Washington, DC, dealt with UN political affairs, non-proliferation, the Horn of Africa, and NATO.  After graduating from Lawrence, Ambassador Murray received a J.D. from Cornell Law School.  He resides in Brussels, Belgium.


Date: 
Sunday, September 16, 2018 to Friday, September 21, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Politics & History

Time Travel


The idea of traveling to a different time, future or past, has fascinated writers of fiction, philosophy, history and science. This discussion-based seminar will revel in this topic rich in possibilities and paradox from each of those vantage points, though the primary point of entry will be through fiction. Our texts will be The Time Traveler’s Wife, by Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Machine, by H.G. Wells, Einstein’s Dreams, by Alan Lightman, and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, by F. Scott Fitzgerald. We will also screen at least one time traveling movie. As the week unfolds, most likely in the usual linear way (though one never knows!), we will discuss not only time travel itself but also its place in popular culture, our own ways (both as individuals and as a society) of traveling through time and whether time even exists at all.

Required Reading: The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, any edition.
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells, any edition.
Einstein’s Dreams by Alan Lightman, any edition.
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button by F. Scott Fitzgerald, any edition.

Roy Underhill ’81 graduated from Lawrence University with degrees in philosophy and piano performance and graduated from the University of Chicago Law School in 1984. After six years of varied law practice, he spent 20 years as a stay-at-home homeschooling dad. Last summer he was lucky enough to snag a Bjorklunden seminar gig and, when asked to do another one in 2018, traveled in his mind back in time to sixth grade when he read a story about a man who is hurled backward in time to become the explosion we now call the Big Bang. That visit to the past started the sequence of events that has resulted in the time line in which he offers this seminar.


Date: 
Sunday, September 16, 2018 to Friday, September 21, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Literature

 

Woods in the Morning, Wine in the Afternoon


Spend the mornings learning to read the landscape, understand its past, live its present, and anticipate its future in the rich ecosystems of Door County, where natural phenomena seduce the spirit and transfix the mind. Field walks, plant identifications, and stimulating discussions heighten one’s appreciation of nature. Then, enjoy leisurely afternoons discussing the scientific and cultural dimensions of wine while indulging in some delectable wine tasting sessions. 

Nicholas Maravolo has published widely in botany during his fifty-year tenure as professor of biology at Lawrence University. He has taught on a wide range of environmental concerns. His fieldwork has taken him to the Pacific Rim, Central and South America, and Europe, as well as the American West. Maravolo has taught wine science and appreciation to a variety of audiences and has traveled the world to experience the ambience and tastes of various wine countries.


Date: 
Sunday, September 16, 2018 to Friday, September 21, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Nature & Earth Science

"Significant Others":  Celebrated Acting Teams of Hollywood’s Golden Age


The Classic Era of American filmmaking produced several effective and popular "star duos," men and women whose professional careers and personal lives often intertwined to the delight of movie audiences at home and abroad.  Such pairs of leading actors appeared in films across all genres: historical adventures, serious dramas, crime and mystery films, westerns, musicals, war pictures, and light comedies. They were customarily assisted by a capable roster of supporting players, whose presence further enhanced the creative teaming of the men and women at the top of the cast list.  This seminar will explore representative works by a few of these famous star partnerships, examining such topics as the chemistry between the two headliners; their working relationships with directors, screenwriters, and other members of the creative team; the central role of the character actors who often appeared in several of their successive films; and the stylistic qualities and substantive themes that have made the films of these "Significant Others" enduring hallmarks of Hollywood's Golden Age.  

Jack Rhodes received his Ph.D. in English literature from the University of Texas at Austin and later became interested in communication and film studies.  His principal academic assignments were at Colorado College, the University of Utah, and Miami University (Ohio), where he taught the graduate course on Rhetoric of Film for several years.  Rhodes also served as chair of the Department of Communication at Miami and retired as executive director of Miami's regional campus in Hamilton, Ohio.  He is the author of three books and several scholarly articles and has recently concentrated his research and lecturing on the rhetoric of film genres.  This will be his tenth year teaching Björklunden seminars.


Date: 
Sunday, September 23, 2018 to Friday, September 28, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
film

Behold the Man: Religious Reformer Martin Luther (1483-1546) and the Politics of Identity  

 
In 1517, a little-known Augustinian friar named Martin Luther posted his “95 theses” on the door of All Saints’ Church in Wittenberg, Germany.  Meant to inspire religious debate, the document instead sparked a firestorm of protest against an established world order that had endured for centuries.  Branded by his enemies a heretic and schismatic, Luther was exalted by his followers as a rebel with a cause and a prophet.  Hailed today as the key figure in the transition from the medieval to the modern world, Luther, by introducing a new vision of man’s relationship with God, and redefining man’s relationship with authority, has also been hailed as the first modern man.  Sources for Luther’s life are rich and varied.  He wrote a good deal, and a good deal has been written about him, nearly as much as has been written about Jesus.  Besides explore Luther’s ideas and their impact, the seminar will paint the person of Luther “warts and all.”  While Luther in his time, and to this day, has been both revered and reviled, advocates of intellectual freedom will forever be in his debt.  

Required Reading: Martin Luther – The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World by Eric Metaxas. Viking, 2017.  ISBN: 978-1101980019

Optional Readings: Here I Stand – A Life of Martin Luther by Roland Bainton, any edition.
Religion and the Rise of Capitalism by R. H. Tawney, any edition.
Young Man Luther – A Study in Psychoanalysis and History by Erik H. Erikson, any edition
Martin Luther’s Basic Theological Writings edited by Timothy F. Lull
The Road to Character by David Brooks, any edition

Gerry Max, ‘67, earned his B.A. in History from Lawrence University and, from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.A. in Classics, Ph. D. in Ancient History and M.L. S. in Library Science.   For the Whitman Institute in San Francisco, he wrote reviews on books about moral development, self-psychology, and left-right brain research.   Besides teaching Ancient and Medieval History in the University of Wisconsin System, he has taught World History, Art Appreciation, Environmental Spiritualism, Ethics, and Death and Dying at Lakeland College and Viterbo University.   He has published articles on a number of humanities-related topics.   He collects and appraises rare books.   His wife Carole and he live in Madison, Wisconsin.


Date: 
Sunday, September 23, 2018 to Friday, September 28, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
religion

Independence Corrupted/How America’s Judges (Really) Make Their Decisions


How do judges really make their decisions?  To answer, Independence Corrupted goes behind the bench with a judge / law professor.  Under ‘the rule of law,’ how can different judges reach different legal conclusions?  To answer, Independence Corrupted locates “judicial independence” historically and examines “corruption” far beyond bribery.  It analyzes myriad factors – race, religion, gender, personality, political philosophy, electoral ambition, substance abuse, spousal influence – compromising merit-based decision-making.  Provocative and personal, Independence Corrupted draws from the most compelling cases Judge Schudson decided – alone, as a trial judge; collaboratively, as an appellate judge.  And with a text “hot off the press,” it examines the recent Supreme Court decisions destroying judicial independence.

Required Reading: Independence Corrupted / How America’s Judges Make Their Decisions by Charles Schudson. University of Wisconsin Press, 2018. 

Charlie Schudson (www.keynoteseminars.net) graduated from Dartmouth College and the University of Wisconsin Law School.  He served as a state and federal prosecutor, and as a Wisconsin trial and appellate judge.  He also served as the “Law and Literature Scholar in Residence” at Lawrence, and on the faculties of:  the National Judicial College; the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges; the Marquette and Wisconsin law schools; and as a Fulbright Scholar teaching at law schools abroad.  His published works include On Trial: America’s Courts and Their Treatment of Sexually Abused Children (Beacon Press).  He was a featured guest on The MacNeil/Lehrer Report and Oprah.  Since 2004, Charlie has presented ten Björklunden seminars, two with his wife, Karen.  They live in Sedona and Ellison Bay.


Date: 
Sunday, September 23, 2018 to Friday, September 28, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Law & Politics

Juvenal’s Satires


Satire is a Roman literary creation, and Juvenal (fl. early 2nd century CE) is clearly the satirist par excellence.  After all, in times like these, he says, “It’s difficult not to write satire.”  Whether he is excoriating emperors (only dead ones, of course) or lambasting lowly slaves, his 16 satires expose the sins and foibles and moral failures of those living in an international metropolis wherein honest, hardworking, native Romans are few and far between.  Social boundaries are blurred, the Roman elite corrupt, the wealthy selfish, the poor wanting only “bread and circuses,” and Juvenal describes it all in his always witty, sometimes harsh, and often imitated verses.  He is the master of the memorable one-liner, e.g., “a sound mind in a sound body” and the famous query “who will guard the guards themselves.”  Yet he wrote in a time once described as “the happiest era known to man.”  So our author exaggerates, as all satirists do, but he also invites his readers to examine critically the society in which they are living and thereby addresses us moderns as well as his fellow Romans.  Our discussions are sure to be lively and will focus on Roman society—and maybe our own--as well as Juvenal’s remarkable and vivid “take” on it.  Either Niall Rudd’s or Peter Green’s translation (both have notes) will provide us with an eminently readable, enjoyable, and educational experience. 

Required Reading: Juvenal, The Satires, translated by Niall Rudd. Oxford University Press, 2008. ISBN: 978-0199540662 OR Juvenal, The Sixteen Satires, translated by Peter Green. Penguin Classics, 1998 (reprinted 2004). ISBN: 978-0140447040

Daniel Taylor ‘63 is the Hiram A. Jones Professor and Chair Emeritus of Classics at Lawrence University. He is the author of three books and dozens of articles.  He was named Lawrence’s Outstanding Teacher in 1998, Wisconsin’s Distinguished Foreign Language Educator in 1990, and was nationally acclaimed for Excellence in Teaching the Classics in 1983.  He is a two-time yearlong National Endowment for the Humanities Research Fellow and a Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Italy. Now retired, he and his wife Donna live in Summit County, CO, and have organized and led four Björklunden Seminars Abroad to Greece and Italy. “Dr. Dan” revels in the Björklunden experience and is looking forward to his 29th Björklunden seminar.


Date: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018 to Friday, October 5, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Literature

Medical Heroes and Medical Neros


A look at those men and women who throughout history, bravely defied the existing wisdom of their day in an effort to either advance science, improve health, or just get rich. Ignaz Semmelweis questioned the higher mortality rates of pregnant women delivered by professors coming from autopsies, compared to midwives, and was promptly thrown off the medical staff for insisting that they wash their hands before going in to deliver a baby. Now he is known as the Father of Hand Hygiene which is the single most important way to prevent infections today. In the 1920’s charlatan doctor John Brinkley implanted goat testicles in men who wanted to feel more virile. As a master salesman who used radio to advertise, he became extremely wealthy preying on thousands of insecure men, but died a pauper from the many lawsuits that ensued from unsatisfied customers. In 1982 when Dr Barry Marshall suggested that peptic ulcers were caused by bacteria, no one in the medical establishment believed him, and he had to infect himself with the agent to prove it.  Now ulcers are routinely treated with antibiotics and he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his discovery in 2005. Our lives have certainly been influenced by these creative pioneers and shameless quacks, sometimes for the better and sometimes not.

David W. Hines '76 MD, FACP graduated from Lawrence wishing to pursue a career in medicine.  Achieving only a B average, he decided to bypass the rigorous admission requirements of the American Medical system and enrolled in the Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara in 1977. After a brief tour in the minor leagues, he transferred to Rush Medical School in Chicago for the last two years of medical school and where he stayed for residency and fellowship. In 1987 at the age of 33 he got his first job as an Infectious Disease Consultant.  He married Nancy Gazzola, also LU '76 and they live in Oak Park Illinois. They have three children, Jenny, Giulia and Sam, none of whom are in the medical field.


Date: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018 to Friday, October 5, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Science & History

The Science and Folklore of Plants and Fungi


We will conceptually travel from the Doctrine of Signatures to the scientific discoveries of the 21st century.  Enjoying both the lore and science of the members of these living kingdoms, our goal is to find as many beautiful wildflowers and fungi as we can by visiting the most pristine preserves and diverse habitats.  Autumn is the time of abundance for fungi.  You will learn the names of common fungi and the essential role they play in the web of life.  You will also learn how to become proficient in identifying wildflowers, and what the different field guides offer in terms of doing this.  We will also discuss the origin and evolution of flowering plants including what they are evolving towards.  As always, we will take advantage of any birds or other animals we encounter in our explorations of the natural areas in the county.

Don Quintenz has been teaching environmental education since 1967 and came to the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center in 1981.  He previously worked with the Milwaukee Public Schools as their environmental specialist for five years, and before that he was with the Wisconsin Humane Society for three years as their environmental educator and the Wisconsin DNR as a resource technician.  He is currently the Senior Ecologist at Audubon. The skill Quintenz has that he cherishes the most is his ability to excite and fascinate people about the natural world because of his intimate familiarity with the native flora and fauna.

Charlotte Lukes has been studying Door County’s wild mushrooms since 1972 and has compiled a list of 570 species she has seen and identified. The Ridges Sanctuary was where she began her workshops and mushroom forays when her husband, Roy, was manager and chief naturalist there. She has presented mushroom slide programs in many parts of eastern Wisconsin. Charlotte has taught mushroom classes for nearly 40 years and leads frequent mushroom forays in the state parks of Door County. UW Green Bay has 147 of her mushroom species in their Biodiversity Center web site and she plans to add more over the next winter. She has taught many classes at Bjorklunden with her husband over the past 20 years.


Date: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018 to Friday, October 5, 2018
Fee(s): 
$895 double; $1,175 single; $450 commuter
Topic(s): 
Nature & Earth Science

Experience Bjorklunden: Explore Door County on Your Own


This week offers guests the unique opportunity to enjoy Door County’s beauty at their own pace.  Bjorklunden will serve as home for the week—or just a few days—while the pressures of day-to-day living melt away.  Guests will be in charge of their own daily schedule, whether it is visiting The Ridges, playing a few rounds of golf, or simply relaxing on the deck.  Registration fee will be prorated based on length of stay.  All meals are included, with the exception of Wednesday dinner.


Date: 
Sunday, October 14, 2018 to Friday, October 19, 2018
Fee(s): 
$650 double; $920 single
Topic(s): 
Houseguest

Experience Bjorklunden: Explore Door County on Your Own

 

This week offers guests the unique opportunity to enjoy Door County’s beauty at their own pace.  Bjorklunden will serve as home for the week—or just a few days—while the pressures of day-to-day living melt away.  Guests will be in charge of their own daily schedule, whether it is visiting The Ridges, playing a few rounds of golf, or simply relaxing on the deck.  Registration fee will be prorated based on length of stay.  All meals are included, with the exception of Wednesday dinner.


Date: 
Sunday, October 7, 2018 to Friday, October 12, 2018
Fee(s): 
$650 double; $920 single
Topic(s): 
Houseguest

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