2014–15 Convocation Series

Convocations are held in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel and are free and open to the public.

Matriculation Convocation
Thursday, September 18, 2014
11:10 a.m.

"Sustaining Dialogue:  Educating for a Diverse Society"
President Mark Burstein

 

 

 


Tuesday, November 4, 2014
11:10 a.m.
“Leveraging Mind And Body To Perform Your Best Under Stress”
Sian Beilock

Sian Beilock, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology and a member of the Committee on Education at the University of Chicago and an expert on the brain science behind “choking under pressure” and the many factors influencing all types of performance: from test-taking to presentations to your golf swing. Dr. Beilock will share with us what happens in our brain and body when we experience the dreaded performance anxiety. And what are we doing differently when everything magically “clicks” into place. From the ways body language can improve your memory to how to master public speaking, Beilock explains a wealth of fascinating interconnections between mind and body and shows how mastering them can make us happier, safer and more successful.

Her research is supported by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education and her work is routinely covered in the media. Dr. Beilock received an award for Transformative Early Career Contributions from the Association for Psychological Science in 2011. Her critically acclaimed book Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About  Getting It Right When You Have To was published in 2010 and her new book How the Body Knows Its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel comes out January 6th, 2015 (Simon & Schuster, Atria Books).


Tuesday, February 17, 2015
11:10 a.m.
“A Decent Respect: Honor and Citizenship at Home and Abroad”
Kwame Anthony Appiah

Kwame Anthony Appiah is often called a postmodern Socrates, and for good reason; he asks probing questions about identity, ethnicity, honor and religion during a time when these difficult notions continue to shift. Exciting and erudite, Appiah challenges us to look beyond the boundaries—real and imagined—that divide us, and to celebrate our common humanity. Appiah teaches at New York University, and has previously taught at Princeton, Harvard, Yale, Cornell, Duke and the University of Ghana. He is also the President of the PEN American Center. In 2012, he was awarded the National Humanities Medal by The White House.

He is also the award-winning author of the books Cosmopolitanism and The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen. Appiah was born in London, raised in Ghana, and educated in England at Cambridge University where he received a Ph.D. in philosophy.


Honors Convocation
Thursday, May 14, 2015
11:10 a.m.

“Is It Warm In Here? The Intractable Challenges of Climate Change”
David Gerard

 

Video Archives

Main Hall Forum

Main Hall Forum presents a wide range of lectures by Lawrence faculty and distinguished guest speakers on historical and contemporary issues and recent scholarship in the humanities.

Economics Colloquium

The Economics Colloquium began in 2010 and features talks from visiting scholars, distinguished alumni and guests, and Lawrence faculty.  Topics run the gamut from hardcore economic theory (presented in an audience-friendly  fashion, of course) to social science and policy issues more generally.  The Colloquium typically features an author of the Senior Experience work in economics.

Science Hall Colloquium

The Science Hall Colloquium presents a series of cross-disciplinary lectures that address research developments in diverse areas of the natural, physical and social sciences.

Fine Arts Colloquium

The Fine Arts Colloquium presents several occasional lectures during the academic year that touch on topics related to art, art history, and theatre.

The Mojmir Povolny Lectureship in International Studies

Established in 1987 and named in honor of long-time Lawrence government professor Mojmir Povolny, the lectureship promotes interest and discussion on issues of moral significance and ethical dimensions.

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