This summer, from June 29 to July 13, students in our Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) programs will register for three fall term classes.

If you are in our Bachelor of Music or Double-Degree program, you do not register during the summer. You will register for your core music courses during Welcome Week in the fall, after music theory placement information is available—which depends, of course, on your taking the music theory placement exam (so don't forget to complete it by August 1).

We presume that you have already activated your Voyager account (go here if you haven't) and spent some time reading through some of the registration resources you have received from our registrar (the person in charge of student records, registration, etc.). These documents contain specific instructions about how to register for your classes. (On that page we have also included a handy guide to understanding graduation requirements.)

This page is designed to help direct some of your thinking about what courses to take based on your interests so that you can approach your registration with confidence.

Choosing your fall term courses in a few easy steps

For students in the Bachelor of Arts program, choosing the courses you'll take this fall is pretty straightforward. You'll meet with your advisor during Welcome Week to talk more about your interests, and see if the two of you need to make any changes to the courses you've selected this summer.

(In other words, you can breathe easy; none of the decisions you're making this summer are forever etched in stone.)

You'll take three classes, one of which is already determined for you.

  • Freshman Studies, which meets MWF from 11:10 to 12:20. (We'll take care of placing you into your particular section over the summer. You'll get your details about this—your instructor and the classroom—later this summer.)
  • You get to choose the other two courses.

How do you choose your other two courses?

Start by putting yourself into one of the following categories:

I am not sure what I want to study

Know that you're in good company.

For your first course, choose a 100-level course from an academic division that interests you at this time. (See sidebar)

For your second course, choose a 100-level course from a different academic division than your first course.

 

I know—or at least think I know—that I'm interested in...

Anthropology

Course 1: You might consider taking ANTH 110-Cultural Anthropology.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or natural sciences (see sidebar).

See anthropology major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 36-51. 

Art

Course 1: Depending on your interest, you might consider taking ART 100-Introduction to Studio Art or ART 110-Introduction to Drawing.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the humanities, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See art major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 52-62.

Art History

Course 1: You might consider taking ARHI 102-Survey II: Renaissance to Modern.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the humanities, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See art history major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 63-70.

Biology or Biochemistry

Course 1: You might consider taking BIOL 130-Integrative Biology: Cells to Organisms.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or social sciences (see sidebar).

See biology major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 77-90. For biochemistry, see 71-76.

Chemistry

Course 1: You might consider taking CHEM 116-Principles of Chemistry: Energy & Dynamics. This class requires approval by the instructor, as you'll see when you link to the course requirements. (Read the course description on page 98 of the Course Catalog for more detail.)

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or social sciences (see sidebar).

See chemistry major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 95-106.

Chinese

Course 1: You might consider taking CHJA 101-Beginning Chinese 1. If you believe your experience with Chinese has prepared you for a higher level, you can discuss your placement options with the department chair when you arrive for Welcome Week.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See Chinese major and minor requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 107-115.

Classics

Course 1: You might consider taking CLAS 100-Beginning Latin, CLAS 125-Intensive Elementary Greek, or CLAS 160-Survey of Roman History. If you believe your experience with Latin or Greek has prepared you for a higher level, you can discuss your placement options with the department chair when you arrive for Welcome Week.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See Classics major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 116-125.

Computer Science or Mathematics-Computer Science

Course 1: You might consider, based on your experience with calculus (AP or IB), taking MATH 140-Calculus 1 or MATH 150-Calculus 2. Register based on how you think you'll place; you can always change it during Welcome Week.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or social sciences (see sidebar)

See computer science requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 133-140.

Economics

Course 1: You might consider taking ECON 100-Introductory Microeconomics.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or natural sciences (see sidebar).

See economics major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 150-163.

Education

Course 1: You might consider taking EDST 180-Psychology of Learning.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or natural sciences (see sidebar).

See education requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 164-178.

English

Course 1: You might consider taking ENG 150-Literary Analysis.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See English major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 179-193.

Environmental Studies

The first Environmental Studies course you could take will be available in the winter term, so for the fall term we encourage you to choose for...

Course 1: A 100-level course from an academic division that interests you at this time (see sidebar).

Course 2: A 100-level course from a different academic division from your first course.

See environmental studies major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 194-209.

Film Studies

Course 1: You might consider taking FIST 100-Introduction to Film Studies.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the humanities, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See film studies requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 225-234.

French

Course 1: If you've taken French before, we encourage you keep going with it in your first term. You'll need to take the French placement exam before registering for a French class, because it will help determine which of the many options you should take. (You'll get a placement recommendation right away.) Depending on the results, you may be able to take a course like FREN 101 or FREN 201. (Be sure to scroll down to Fall Term 2014.)

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See French & Francophone Studies requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 235-245.

Gender Studies

The first Gender Studies course you could take will be available in the winter term, so for the fall term we encourage you to choose for...

Course 1: A 100-level course from an academic division that interests you at this time (see sidebar).

Course 2: A 100-level course from a different academic division from your first course.

See gender studies requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 248-259.

Geology

Course 1: You might consider taking GEOL 110-Introductory Geology.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or social sciences (see sidebar).

See geology requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 260-269.

German

Course 1: If you've taken German before, we encourage you keep going with it in your first term. You'll need to take the German placement exam before registering for a German class, because it will help determine which of the many options you should take. (You should get a placement recommendation right away.) Your results will help you determine which German class to take. (Be sure to scroll down to Fall Term 2014..

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See German requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 270-278.

Government

Course 1: You might consider taking GOVT 110-Introduction to Political Science or GOVT 140-Introduction to International Relations.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or natural sciences (see sidebar).

See government requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 279-294.

History

Course 1: You might consider taking HIST 120-Africa to 1800, HIST 130-Colonies-Republic 1607-1789, HIST 160-Traditional East Asian Civilization, or HIST 185-Survey of Roman History.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See history requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 295-317.

Japanese

Course 1: You might consider taking CHJA 111-Beginning Japanese 1. If you believe your experience with Japanese has prepared you for a higher level, you can discuss your placement options with the department chair when you arrive for Welcome Week.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See Japanese minor requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 107-115.

Linguistics

Course 1: You might consider taking LING 150-Introduction to Linguistics.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See linguistics requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 324-333.

Mathematics

Course 1: You might consider, based on your experience with calculus (AP or IB), taking MATH 140-Calculus 1 or MATH 150-Calculus 2. Register based on how you think you'll place; you can always change it during Welcome Week.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or social sciences (see sidebar)

See mathematics requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 324-333.

Neuroscience

Course 1: You might consider taking BIOL 130-Biology: Cells to Organisms.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or social sciences (see sidebar).

See neuroscience requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 349-353.

Philosophy

Course 1: You might consider taking PHIL 100-Introduction to Philosophy: Problems, PHIL 120-Introduction to Biomedical Ethics, or PHIL 130-Meditation & Virtue.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See philosophy requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 354-363.

Physics

Course 1: We strongly recommend you take MATH 140 Calculus 1 or MATH 150-Calculus 2 (and save your physics course starting in Winter Term).

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or social sciences (see sidebar).

See physics requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 364-375.

Psychology

Course 1: You might consider taking PSYC 100-Principles of Psychology or PSYC 180-Psychology of Learning.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities, or natural sciences (see sidebar).

See psychology requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 376-389.

Religious Studies

Course 1: You might consider taking RLST 215-Buddhism in India and Tibet, RLST 225-Introduction to Judaism, or RLST 260-Christianity Through the 15th Century.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See religious studies requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 390-397.

Russian

Course 1: You might consider taking RUSS 101-Beginning Russian 1. If you have studied Russian in the past and believe that a more advanced course may be a better fit for you, please arrange to take a placement exam by contacting Peter Thomas by email or 920-832-7250.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or natural sciences (see sidebar).

See Russian requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 398-408.

Spanish

Course 1: If you've taken Spanish before, we encourage you keep going with it in your first term. You'll need to take the Spanish placement exam before registering for a Spanish class, because it will help determine which of the many options you should take. (You'll get a placement recommendation right away.) Depending on the results, you may be able to take SPAN 101, SPAN 102, SPAN 201, or SPAN 202. (Be sure to scroll down to Fall Term 2014.)

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See Spanish requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 409-422.

Theatre Arts

Course 1: You might consider taking THAR 135-Stagecraft, THAR 137-Costume Crafts & Technology, or THAR 149-Movement for the Theatre; Social Dance.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the humanities, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See theatre arts requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 423-437.

Something else not listed here

For your first course, choose a 100-level course from an academic division that interests you at this time (see sidebar).

For your second course, choose a 100-level course from a different academic division than your first course.

If you're thinking you might be a pre-med or pre-law student, choose this option. You will meet with a pre-med advisor during Welcome Week who can help you plan your curriculum for all four years.

 

 

Academic Divisions

Beyond having a college and a conservatory, Lawrence University is also organized into four major academic divisions. As you're perusing this page, you'll see suggestions to choose from one of these divisions to complement your area of academic interest. Use the 2014-15 Course Catalog and the Class Schedule to learn more course descriptions and course availability, respectively.

Fine Arts

  • Art
  • Art History
  • Music
  • Theatre Arts

Humanities

  • Chinese
  • Classics
  • English
  • French and Francophone Studies
  • German
  • History
  • Japanese
  • Philosophy
  • Religious Studies
  • Russian
  • Spanish

Natural Sciences

  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Geology
  • Mathematics and Computer Science
  • Physics

Social Sciences

  • Anthropology
  • Economics
  • Education Studies
  • Government
  • Psychology

We also offer interdisciplinary programs that tie together strengths from different departments to create areas such as: Biomedical Ethics, East Asian Studies, Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies, and Linguistics.

What are the graduation requirements?

We won't replicate all the requirements here; there is a nice (and thorough) explanation of them on pages 21-28 of the Course Catalog.

However, here are a few things for Bachelor of Arts candidates to keep in mind.

You need to complete 216 units—approximately 36 courses—to graduate. (A "unit" is a component of one Lawrence University course; most courses are 6 units.) 

This means you'll generally take 9 courses each year, neatly divided into 3 courses for each of your 3 10-week terms (Fall, Winter, and Spring Term.

Your academic work during your time at Lawrence breaks roughly into three parts:

  • General Education requirements, which include:
    • Freshman Studies (two terms)
    • Distribution Requirements (one course from each of Lawrence's four major divisions)
    • Diversity Courses (two courses)
    • Competency Requirements (one each from writing or speaking; quantitative analysis; foreign language)
  • Your academic major, a concentration of courses in an academic area
  • Elective courses, flexible space in your curriculum which you can use to:
    • complete another major
    • complete a minor or two
    • complete a whole bunch of courses that you find interesting, but don't add up to a major or minor

To register for classes now, you do not need to worry about how all these fit together. Anything you take in your first term at Lawrence will fit into one of the three parts above.

Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube