This summer, from June 27 to July 11, students in our Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) programs will register for three fall term classes.

If you are in our Bachelor of Music or Double-Degree program, you do not register during the summer. You will register for your core music courses during Welcome Week in the fall, after music theory placement information is available—which depends, of course, on your taking the music theory placement exam (so don't forget to complete it by May 31).

We presume that you have already activated your Voyager account (go here if you haven't) and spent some time reading through some of the registration resources you have received from our registrar (the person in charge of student records, registration, etc.). These documents contain specific instructions about how to register for your classes. (On that page we have also included a handy guide to understanding graduation requirements.)

This page is designed to help direct some of your thinking about what courses to take based on your interests so that you can approach your registration with confidence.

Choosing your fall term courses in a few easy steps

For students in the Bachelor of Arts program, choosing the courses you'll take this fall is pretty straightforward. You'll meet with your advisor during Welcome Week to talk more about your interests and see if the two of you need to make any changes to the courses you've selected this summer.

(In other words, you can breathe easy; none of the decisions you're making this summer are forever etched in stone.)

You'll take three classes, one of which is already determined for you.

  • Freshman Studies, which meets MWF from 11:10 to 12:20. (You'll get more details about this—your instructor and the classroom—later this summer.)
  • You get to choose the other two courses!

How do you choose your other two courses?

Start by putting yourself into one of the following categories:

I am not sure what I want to study

Know that you're in good company.

For your first course, choose a 100-level course from an academic division that interests you at this time. (See sidebar)

For your second course, choose a 100-level course from a different academic division than your first course.

 

I know—or at least think I know—that I'm interested in...

Anthropology

Course 1: You might consider taking ANTH 110-Cultural Anthropology.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or natural sciences (see sidebar).

All other introductory anthropology course will be offered during Winter and Spring Terms, including ANTH 120-World Prehistory in the winter and ANTH 140-Biological Anthropology in the spring.

See anthropology major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 20-30. 

Studio Art

Course 1: Depending on your interest, you might consider taking ART 100-Introduction to Studio Art or ART 110-Introduction to Drawing.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the humanities, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See art major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 31-39.

Art History

Course 1: You might consider taking ARHI 101-Survey of Western Art I: Ancient to Medieval.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or natural sciences (see sidebar).

The follow-up to this introductory course, Survey II-Renaissance to Modern, will be offered during both Winter and Spring Terms.

See art history major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 40-47.

Biology or Biochemistry

Course 1: You might consider taking BIOL 130-Cells to Organisms.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or natural sciences (see sidebar).

All other introductory biology courses will be offered during Winter and Spring Terms, including BIOL 150-Organisms to Ecosystems and BIOL 170-Biology of Human Reproduction.

See biology major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 52-61. For biochemistry, see 48-51. For biomedical ethics, see 62-67.

Chemistry

Course 1: You might consider taking CHEM 116-Principles of Chemistry: Energetics & Dynamics. This class requires approval by the instructor, since previous knowledge of chemistry is needed.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or natural sciences (see sidebar).

If you wait until Winter Term, you can take CHEM 115-Principles of Chemistry: Structure & Reactivity. In the spring, you will be able to enroll in CHEM 108-Chemistry of Art. Students without advanced experience in the area are encouraged to take this as their first chemistry course.

See chemistry major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 68-76.

Chinese

Course 1: You might consider taking CHJA 101-Beginning Chinese 1. If you believe your experience with Chinese has prepared you for a higher level, you can discuss your placement options with the department chair when you arrive for Welcome Week.

Course 2:Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or natural sciences (see sidebar).

Introductory language courses progress as a sequence throughout an entire year. After taking Beginning Chinese 1, you can enroll in CHJA 102-Beginning Chinese 2 during Winter Term and CHJA 201-Beginning Intermediate Chinese during Spring Term.

See Chinese major and minor requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 77-83.

Classics

Course 1: You might consider taking CLAS 100-Intensive Beginning Latin or CLAS 125-Intensive Beginning Greek. If your experience with Latin or Greek has prepared you for a higher level, you can discuss your placement options with the department chair when you arrive for Welcome Week.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

Other introductory courses will be offered in Winter and Spring Terms, including CLAS 150-Survey of Greek History in the winter and CLAS 101-Introduction to Classics in the spring.

See Classics major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 84-91.

Computer Science or Mathematics-Computer Science

Course 1: You might consider, based on your experience with calculus (AP or IB), taking MATH 140-Calculus 1 or MATH 150-Calculus 2. Register based on how you think you'll place; you can always change it during Welcome Week.

Course 2: You can take beginning computer science courses throughout the year, including CMSC 150-Introduction to Computer Science in Fall and Spring Terms and CMSC 106-Web Client Programming in Winter Term.

See computer science requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 98-102.

Economics

Course 1: You might consider taking ECON 100-Introductory Microeconomics.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or natural sciences (see sidebar).

Other introductory courses are offered during later trms, such as ENST 151-Introduction to Environmental Policy in the winter.

See economics major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 110-120.

Education

Course 1: You might consider taking EDST 180-Psychology of Learning.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or natural sciences (see sidebar).

Most other education studies courses require sophomore standing.

See education requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 121-131.

English

Course 1: You might consider taking ENG 150-Literary Analysis, which is available during every term at Lawrence.

Course 2: If you are interested in exploring poetry, look into ENG 370-Creative Writing: Poetry. Otherwise, choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

See English major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 132-142.

Environmental Studies

Course 1: Environmental studies is intended to pair well with a major in economics, government or geology. You may want to to explore 100-level courses in either of those disciplines during your first term.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or social sciences (see sidebar).

Introductory courses in environmental studies will be available during Winter and Spring Term, including ENST 151-Introduction to Environmental Policy in the winter and ENST 150-Environmental Science in the spring.

See environmental studies major requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 143-154.

Film Studies

Course 1: You might consider taking FIST 100-Introduction to Film Studies.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the humanities, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

You can enroll in most film studies and video production courses after completing FIST 100.

See film studies requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 166-177.

French

Course 1: If you've taken French before, we encourage you keep going with it in your first term. You'll need to take the French placement exam before registering for a French class, because it will help determine which of the many options you should take. You'll get a placement recommendation right away.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

Introductory language courses progress as a sequence throughout an entire year. After taking FREN 101-Beginning French I, you can enroll in FREN 102-Beginning French II during Winter Term. Depending on your level of interest, you can then conclude the French sequence with FREN 200-Intermediate French I, or continue pursuing fluency with FREN 201-Intermediate French II during Spring Term.

See French & Francophone Studies requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 178-186.

Gender Studies

Course 1: You might consider taking GEST 100-Introduction to Gender Studies.

Course 2: A 100-level course from a different academic division (see sidebar).

Other gender studies courses will be available to freshmen in later terms, including HIST 140-Gender and Feminism in Historical Perspective during Spring Term.

See gender studies requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 188-196.

Geology

Course 1: You might consider taking GEOL 110-Introductory Geology.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or social sciences (see sidebar).

Geology is intended to pair well with environment studies. If interested, you might consider also enrolling in ENST 150-Environmental Science during Spring Term.

See geology requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 197-203.

German

Course 1: If you've taken German before, we encourage you keep going with it in your first term. You'll need to take the German placement exam before registering for a German class, because it will help determine which of the many options you should take. (You should get a placement recommendation right away.) Your results will help you determine which German class to take.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

Introductory language courses progress as a sequence throughout an entire year. After taking GERM 101-German 1, you can enroll in GERM 102-German 2 during Winter Term and GERM 201-Intermediate German I during Spring Term.

See German requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 204-211.

Government

Course 1: You might consider taking GOVT 110-Introduction to Political Science.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or natural sciences (see sidebar).

Other 100-level government classes will be available in later terms, including ENST 151-Introduction to Environmental Policy during Winter Term, and GOVT 140-Introduction to International Relations and GOVT 150-Introduction to Global Studies during Spring Term.

See government requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 212-223.

History

Course 1: You might consider taking HIST 101-Introduction to Historical Methods.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

For more specific historical study, you may be interested in HIST 125-Modern Africa Since 1800 or HIST 160-Traditional East Asian Civilization during Winter Term, or HIST 115-The Modern World or HIST 132-United States: 1896-Present during Spring Term.

See history requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 224-241.

Japanese

Course 1: You might consider taking CHJA 111-Beginning Japanese 1. If you believe your experience with Japanese has prepared you for a higher level, you can discuss your placement options with the department chair when you arrive for Welcome Week.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

Introductory language courses progress as a sequence throughout an entire year. After taking Beginning Japanese I, you can enroll in CHJA 112-Beginning Japanese II during Winter Term and CHJA 211- Beginning Intermediate Japanese during Spring Term.

See Japanese minor requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 77-83.

Linguistics

Course 1: You might consider taking LING 150-Introduction to Linguistics.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

You can enroll in most advanced linguistics courses after completing LING 150.

See linguistics requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 250-256

Mathematics

Course 1: You might consider, based on your experience with calculus (AP or IB), taking MATH 140-Calculus 1 or MATH 150-Calculus 2. Register based on how you think you'll place; you can always change it during Welcome Week.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or social sciences (see sidebar)

See mathematics requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 257-264.

Neuroscience

Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field that incorporates biology, chemistry and psychology. Thus, Advanced neuroscience course begin after you have completed introductory biology and/or chemistry courses.

Course 1: You might consider taking BIOL 130-Biology: Cells to Organisms or CHEM 116-Principles of Chemistry: Energetics & Dynamics (instructor's approval is required for enrollement in this course).

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or social sciences (see sidebar).

See neuroscience requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 276-279.

Philosophy

Course 1: You might consider taking PHIL 100-Introduction to Philosophy: ProblemsPHIL 130-Meditation and Virtue, or PHIL 105-Introduction to Cognitive Science

Course 2: You may also be interested in PHIL 150-Symbolic Logic during Winter Term or PHIL 120-Introduction to Biomedical Ethics during Spring Term.

See philosophy requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 280-287.

Physics

Course 1: We strongly recommend you take MATH 140-Calculus 1 or MATH 150-Calculus 2 before enrolling in physics courses.

Course 2: If you have advanced experience with calculus and receive instructor approval, PHYS 141-Principles of Classical, Relativistic, and Quantum Mechanics will also be available in the fall.

See physics requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 288-295.

Psychology

Course 1: You might consider taking PSYC 100-Principles of Psychology or EDST 180-Psychology of Learning.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, humanities or natural sciences (see sidebar).

See psychology requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 296-306.

Religious Studies

Course 1: You might consider taking RLST 240-Islam or RLST 260-Christianity through the 15th Century.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences.

RLST 100-Introduction to Religious Studies will be offered during Winter and Spring Terms.

See religious studies requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 307-314.

Russian

Course 1: You might consider taking RUSS 101-Beginning Russian 1. If you have studied Russian in the past and believe that a more advanced course may be a better fit for you, please arrange to take a placement exam by contacting Peter Thomas by email or 920-832-7250.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or natural sciences (see sidebar).

Introductory language courses progress as a sequence throughout an entire year. After taking Beginning Russian I, you can enroll in RUSS 102-Beginning Russian II during Winter Term and RUSS 201-Intermediate Russian I during Spring Term.

See Russian requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 315-322.

Spanish

Course 1: If you've taken Spanish before, we encourage you keep going with it in your first term. You'll need to take the Spanish placement exam before registering for a Spanish class, because it will help determine which of the many options you should take. (You'll get a placement recommendation right away.) Depending on the results, you may be able to take SPAN 101, SPAN 201 or SPAN 202.

Course 2: Choose a 100-level course from the fine arts, natural sciences or social sciences (see sidebar).

Introductory language courses progress as a sequence throughout an entire year. After taking Beginning Spanish I, you can enroll in SPAN 102-Beginning Spanish II during Winter Term and SPAN 201-Intermediate Spanish I during Spring Term.

See Spanish requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 323-333.

Theatre Arts

Course 1: You might consider taking THAR 111-Introduction to the Theatre

Course 2: For more specific theatre arts courses, you may be interested in THAR 137-Costume Crafts & Technology or THAR 135-Stagecraft.

Other introductory courses will be offered in later terms, including THAR 187-Acting I or THAR 143-Fundamentals of Movement during Winter Term.

See theatre arts requirements and course descriptions in the Course Catalog, pages 334-345.

Something else not listed here

For your first course, choose a 100-level course from an academic division that interests you at this time (see sidebar).

For your second course, choose a 100-level course from a different academic division than your first course.

If you're thinking you might be a pre-medpre-law or pre-business student, check out our Pre-Professional Study options for more information.

If you are interested in engineering, forestry or occupational therapy, please check out our Cooperative Degree Programs.

 

Academic Divisions

Beyond having a college and a conservatory, Lawrence University is also organized into four major academic divisions. As you're perusing this page, you'll see suggestions to choose from one of these divisions to complement your area of academic interest. Use the 2015-16 Course Catalog and the Class Schedule to learn more course descriptions and course availability, respectively.

Fine Arts

  • Art History
  • Film Studies
  • Music
  • Studio Art
  • Theatre Arts

Humanities

  • Chinese
  • Classics
  • English
  • French & Francophone Studies
  • German
  • History
  • Japanese
  • Linguistics
  • Philosophy
  • Religious Studies
  • Russian
  • Spanish

Natural Sciences

  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Geology
  • Mathematics and Computer Science
  • Neuroscience
  • Physics

Social Sciences

  • Anthropology
  • Economics
  • Education Studies
  • Gender Studies
  • Government
  • Psychology

We also offer interdisciplinary programs that tie together strengths from different departments to create areas such as: East Asian Studies, Ethnic Studies, Innovation & Entrepreneurship, International Studies, Latin American Studies, Museum Studies, and Natural Sciences.

What are the graduation requirements?

We won't replicate all the requirements here; there is a nice (and thorough) explanation of them on pages 10-17 of the Course Catalog.

However, here are a few things for Bachelor of Arts candidates to keep in mind.

You need to complete 216 units—approximately 36 courses—to graduate. (A "unit" is a component of one Lawrence University course; most courses are 6 units.) 

This means you'll generally take 9 courses each year, neatly divided into 3 courses for each trimester (Fall, Winter, and Spring Terms).

Your academic work during your time at Lawrence breaks roughly into three parts:

  • General Education requirements, which include:
    • Freshman Studies (two terms)
    • Distribution Requirements (one course from each of Lawrence's four major divisions)
    • Diversity Courses (two courses)
    • Competency Requirements (one each from writing or speaking; quantitative analysis; foreign language)
  • Academic major requirements, a concentration of courses in an academic area of your choice
  • Elective courses, flexible space in your curriculum which you can use to:
    • complete another major
    • complete a minor or two
    • complete a whole bunch of courses that you find interesting, but don't add up to a major or minor

To register for classes now, you do not need to worry about how all these fit together. Anything you take in your first term at Lawrence will fit into one of the three parts above.

Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube LarryU