Please note: The information displayed here is current as of Wednesday, October 16, 2019, but the official Course Catalog should be used for all official planning.

2019-2020 Course Catalog

Required for the major in classics

Students who major in classics will learn to translate passages of prose and poetry in Greek and Latin (or the language of specialization, in the case of classical civilization concentrators) and use their understanding of Greek or Latin as a tool for interpreting passages in the original language. They will demonstrate their familiarity with the history, cultures, and literary, artistic, and intellectual traditions of the ancient Mediterranean world, with special emphasis on the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. At the conclusion of the major, they will undertake an independent research or creative project in which they relate individual works to larger themes and issues in Greek and Roman literature, history, philosophy, art, and culture as appropriate to their particular area of concentration.

Students may elect to fulfill the requirements of the classics major by concentrating in classical languages and literatures or classical civilization, depending on their intellectual interests and postgraduate plans.

Concentration in classical languages and literatures

  1. The introductory/intermediate sequences in both Latin and Greek (or their equivalents):
    1. CLAS 120: Intensive Beginning Latin and CLAS 220: Intensive Intermediate Latin, and
    2. CLAS 125: Intensive Beginning Greek and CLAS 225: Intensive Intermediate Greek
  2. Four courses at the 300-, 400-, or 500-level in Latin and Greek literature. At least two of these courses must be taken at the 400- or 500-level. The following courses fulfill this requirement:
    • In Latin:
      • CLAS 301/401: Topics in Latin Literature
      • CLAS 302/402: Ovid
      • CLAS 303/403: Catullus and Horace
      • CLAS 304/404: Virgil
      • CLAS 306/406: The Roman Novel
      • CLAS 307/407: Cicero
      • CLAS 308/408: Roman Historians
    • In Greek:
      • CLAS 321/421: Topics in Greek Literature
      • CLAS 322/422: Homer
      • CLAS 323/423: Greek Tragedy
      • CLAS 324/424: Greek Comedy
      • CLAS 326/426: Plato
      • CLAS 327/427: The Attic Orators
      • CLAS 328/428: Greek Historians
    • In Latin and Greek:
      • CLAS 545: Advanced Topics in Classics
  3. Two courses in classical civilization or Greek and Roman history. The following courses fulfill this requirement:
    1. CLAS 101: Introduction to Classics
    2. CLAS 150: Survey of Greek History
    3. CLAS 160: Survey of Roman History
    4. CLAS 250: Classical Mythology
    5. CLAS 260: Ancient Voices: Classical Literature in Translation
    6. CLAS 280: Warfare in Classical Antiquity
    7. CLAS 300: Periclean Athens
    8. CLAS 305: The Fall of the Roman Republic
    9. CLAS 310: Augustan Rome
    10. CLAS 363: Laughter and Pain: Greek and Roman Drama in Translation
    11. CLAS 370: War and Humanity: Greek and Roman Epic in Translation
  4. One additional course in classics or related fields. If desired, this course may be chosen from the following list of courses originating in other departments:
    • ANTH 324 (CLAS 365): Archaeology of the Prehistoric Aegean
    • ANTH 328 (ARHI 325/CLAS 368): Ethics in Archaeology: Who Owns the Past?
    • ARHI 200 (CLAS 340): Archaic and Classical Greek Art
    • ARHI 202 (CLAS 345): From Alexander to Cleopatra: Art of the Hellenistic Age
    • ARHI 204 (CLAS 350): Roman Art
    • ARHI 400 (CLAS 540): Topics in Ancient Art
    • ENG 285: Biblical Narratives in Literature
    • ENG 527: History of the Book
    • HIST 105: Cross-Cultural Interactions Along the Silk Road, 200 BCE - 1400 CE
    • PHIL 200: History of Philosophy: Plato and Aristotle
    • RLST 150: Introduction to the Bible
  5. Senior Experience in classics, to be taken as a 6-unit independent study (CLAS 699).

Concentration in classical civilization

  1. The introductory/intermediate sequences in either Latin or Greek (or the equivalent):
    1. CLAS 120: Intensive Beginning Latin and CLAS 220: Intensive Intermediate Latin, or
    2. CLAS 125: Intensive Beginning Greek and CLAS 225: Intensive Intermediate Greek
  2. Two courses at the 300- or 400-level in the literature of the target language. The following courses fulfill this requirement:
    • In Latin:
      • CLAS 301/401: Topics in Latin Literature
      • CLAS 302/402: Ovid
      • CLAS 303/403: Catullus and Horace
      • CLAS 304/404: Virgil
      • CLAS 306/406: The Roman Novel
      • CLAS 307/407: Cicero
      • CLAS 308/408: Roman Historians
    • In Greek:
      • CLAS 321/421: Topics in Greek Literature
      • CLAS 322/422: Homer
      • CLAS 323/423: Greek Tragedy
      • CLAS 324/424: Greek Comedy
      • CLAS 326/426: Plato
      • CLAS 327/427: The Attic Orators
      • CLAS 328/428: Greek Historians
  3. Five courses in classical civilization or Greek and Roman history. The following courses fulfill this requirement:
    1. CLAS 101: Introduction to Classics
    2. CLAS 150: Survey of Greek History
    3. CLAS 160: Survey of Roman History
    4. CLAS 250: Classical Mythology
    5. CLAS 260: Ancient Voices: Classical Literature in Translation
    6. CLAS 280: Warfare in Classical Antiquity
    7. CLAS 300: Periclean Athens
    8. CLAS 305: The Fall of the Roman Republic
    9. CLAS 310: Augustan Rome
    10. CLAS 363: Laughter and Pain: Greek and Roman Drama in Translation
    11. CLAS 370: War and Humanity: Greek and Roman Epic in Translation
  4. Two additional courses in classics (CLAS) or related fields. If desired, these courses may be chosen from the following list of courses originating in other departments:
    • ANTH 324 (CLAS 365): Archaeology of the Prehistoric Aegean
    • ANTH 328 (ARHI 325/CLAS 368): Ethics in Archaeology: Who Owns the Past?
    • ARHI 200 (CLAS 340): Archaic and Classical Greek Art
    • ARHI 202 (CLAS 345): From Alexander to Cleopatra: Art of the Hellenistic Age
    • ARHI 204 (CLAS 350): Roman Art
    • ARHI 400 (CLAS 540): Topics in Ancient Art
    • ENG 285: Biblical Narratives in Literature
    • ENG 527: History of the Book
    • HIST 105: Cross-Cultural Interactions Along the Silk Road, 200 BCE - 1400 CE
    • PHIL 200: History of Philosophy: Plato and Aristotle
    • RLST 150: Introduction to the Bible
  5. Senior Experience in classics, to be taken as a 6-unit independent study (CLAS 699).

Senior Experience in classics

For students in both concentrations, the major culminates in the Senior Experience in classics, a self-designed project that enables each student to explore a topic of individual interest within the field. The Senior Experience in classics may be fulfilled in a variety of ways, in consultation with the department faculty. Scholarly, pedagogical, creative, and experiential projects are all viable options. Past Senior Experience projects have included: research papers on topics ranging from the interaction of speech and identity in Homer's Iliad to Hannibal's military strategy in Italy during the Second Punic War; choreographing and staging a mixed-media performance that combined dance with the recitation of passages of Greek and Roman lyric poetry; developing a complete syllabus and lesson plans for an introductory course in Latin at the high school level; designing a stage set and lighting for a production of Euripides' Medea; and using computer rendering software to create an explorable three-dimensional model of the Temple of Apollo Epikourios at Bassai in Greece. Other possible experiences might include delivering a scholarly paper at a conference or as part of Classics Week, or working at relevant archaeological sites in Europe and the Mediterranean Sea region. For projects that take place off-campus, an on-campus oral presentation is also required.

The Senior Experience in classics requires 6 units of independent study. Classics majors are required to declare a topic and choose an advisor for their senior experience project no later than the midterm reading period of the Spring Term before their senior year. The due date for the final version of the project will be determined in consultation with the advisor but should normally be no later than the midterm reading period of the Winter Term of the student’s senior year.

Students pursuing double majors, double degrees, and/or education certification are strongly encouraged to consult with their advisors and department chairs to plan and negotiate their overall senior experience as early as possible, especially if they are interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary capstone that integrates their interests in both majors, or combines their student teaching with a project in their major.

Required for the minor in Greek or Latin

  1. One of the following (or their equivalents):
    1. CLAS 120: Intensive Beginning Latin and CLAS 220: Intensive Intermediate Latin, or
    2. CLAS 125: Intensive Beginning Greek and CLAS 225: Intensive Intermediate Greek.
  2. Two upper-level literature courses in the target language at the 300-, 400-, or 500-level; at least one of these courses must be taken at the 400- or 500-level.
  3. Two additional courses in classics.

Required for the minor in classical civilization

  1. Any four courses in classical civilization or ancient history (Greek and/or Roman).
  2. Two additional courses in classics.

Teacher certification in Latin (K-12)

Classics majors can seek certification to teach Latin at the elementary and secondary levels. Students can add an endorsement in a second area (such as another language or English as a second language) by completing the appropriate minor. Students who plan to seek teacher certification should review the requirements in the Education section of the catalog and meet with the director of teacher education, preferably before the end of the sophomore year.

Language competency general education requirement

Students may fulfill the university’s language competency requirement by taking Latin or Greek at the intermediate level (CLAS 220 or CLAS 225) or any 300-, 400-, or 500-level course in Latin or Greek literature.

International study

The undergraduate classics programs at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome (ICCS-Rome), the American University of Rome (ISA Rome), and the College Year in Athens (CYA) are affiliated and approved options for study abroad in classics. Consult the department chair for more details.