All London Centre students are required to take the 3-unit core course, British Life and Culture. Students then opt to take two or three elective courses. While adding two elective courses will provide minimum full-time standing (15 units total), the core course has been specifically designed so that students may consider pursuing three elective courses (21 units total). London Centre courses do not have limited enrollment or prerequisites and are, therefore, open to any London Centre student.

2014-15 London Centre Course Schedule and Descriptions

Fall Term 2014

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology of London – Professor Newman – 6 units
Catalog Description: This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ECON/BIET 291 - Health Policy: A Comparison of U.K. and U.S. Approaches - Professor Finkler - 6 units

This course will compare U.K and U.S. health systems and public health care policies, to analyze the trade-offs made in each country in terms of the “triple bottom line”: access to care, the cost of care, and the quality of care.  It will contrast the complex American system, which offers a multitude of choice in public and private provision, with the British National Health Service, which combines governmental provision of health care funded by taxation.  Students will consider how resources for health services are determined;  how they are allocated among health care providers and patients; who decides how health care is rationed; and who benefits and who loses from such decisions.  Resources from the Office of Health Economics and the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in London will be used to help students understand key health policy topics, which will be contextualized from political, ethical, historical, and  economic standpoints.  This course will meet one of the Bio-medical ethics minor requirements.

ECON 251 - The Economics of London - Professor Finkler - 6 units
This course, developed from Urban Economics (Econ 250), focuses on a single city, London, as the context for analysis, using perspectives of both economic history, and contemporary economic analysis.
London has remained a vibrant city from the late middle ages to the present through a variety of changes to its character, its economy, and the diversity of its population, and the course will use historical sources and enquiry to characterize London’s economic history from its Roman founding at the beginning of the Common Era through various transformations to the present day.  Readings for the course will include Edward Glaeser’s recently published book, The Triumph of the City, which addresses why large cities - despite their congestion, pollution, and crime - encourage people to interact through modern technology and, thus, remain vibrant centers of innovation and economic growth.
London will serve as the classroom for the course, with some meetings taking place at sites in the city such as the Bank of England, the Docks, Fleet Street, Paddington Station , and the Queen Elizabeth II Olympic Park, as well as at museums such as the Design Museum, the Science Museum, and the London Transport Museum.

HIST 247 – Impact of Empire on Great Britain, 1815-1914 – Professor Dobbs – 6 units
Catalog Description: In 1914 the British Empire contained a population of over 400 million people and was territorially the largest empire in world history. While the British spread their ideas about government, language, religion, and culture to their colonies, Britain itself was also profoundly influenced by the colonies it ruled. This course will explore aspects of the impact of the Empire on British politics, economics, society, and popular culture during the 19th century. Among the topics to be covered are the anti-slavery movement, imperialism and new imperialism, jingoism and popular culture, economic responses, and the influence of imperialism on culture and the arts. The myriad resources of London will be used to provide specific examples of how important the Empire was in shaping British identity and institutions during the 19th century. (G&C or E) Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Global GER (01cr), Writing Intensive GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

THAR 211 – Introduction to London Theatre  – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units
Catalog Description: Introduction to a critical approach to theatrical performance.  Students read play scripts before attending a wide range of plays in a variety of performance spaces in London, working towards a developed understanding of dramatic form.  Study of literary and theatrical conventions is designed to enhance students critical sophistication. The course aims to teach students the basic vocabulary of critical terms for thinking about plays in performance and increase their awareness of how their responses may be affected by a play. The course takes advantage of performances and opportunities uniquely available in London.  Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Fosdal – 3 units
Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Harris – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.
Winter Term 2015

Winter Term 2015

ARHI 246 - 19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain – Professor Barnes – 6 units
Catalog Description: In the 19th century, Britain was at the height of her imperial and industrial powers, with a burgeoning middle class with increased spending power. Against this background, this course examines the painting (including Turner, Constable, the Pre-Raphaelites, the High Victorians), architecture, furniture, and interiors of the period, utilizing the wealth of examples in London’s museums, galleries, and buildings. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

GOVT 385 - Modern British Politics – Professor Fosdal – 6 units
Catalog Description: This course analyzes the central structures and processes of British politics, the important policy issues of recent years, British attitudes toward the political system, and critiques of British politics and history. Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

HIST 150 – Stuart England 1603-1714 – Professor Dobbs – 6 units
Catalog Description: This course explores the causes and impact of the English Civil War, the effect of the Restoration, the Glorious Revolution, and the path to the Hanoverian Succession. The economics, politics, religion, social history, and cultural aspects of the period are also studied. Visits to museums and buildings of the period are included. (E) Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course

THAR 279 – Fringe Theatre in London – Professor Ridgers – 6 units
Catalog Description: This course will attempt to define Fringe Theatre (a movement started in 1968) and to categorize its main elements. The class shall attend a wide variety of plays and venues and come to an understanding of how the fringe has changed over the years. Discussions will address production techniques, the plays themselves, the audiences to whom they appeal, and to what extent the fringe is still an important theatrical force. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 203 – British Crime Fiction – Professor Harris – 6 units
Catalog Description: The course will offer a survey of the development of crime fiction in Britain from the mid-nineteenth century to the pre sent. Taught as a lecture/discussion class, it will also attempt to exploit the London setting to provide a physical context for some of the work under scrutiny. Students will be able to develop their analytical and writing skills, and should expect to achieve a good grasp of the characteristics of genre fiction; they should also be able to recognize the contribution that a study of these popular forms can make to developing a broader understanding of the values and concerns of the society within which they arise. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Fosdal – 3 units
Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Harris – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.
Spring Term 2015

Spring Term 2015

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology of London – Professor Newman – 6 units
Catalog Description: This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ARHI 246 - 19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain – Professor Barnes – 6 units
Catalog Description: In the 19th century, Britain was at the height of her imperial and industrial powers, with a burgeoning middle class with increased spending power. Against this background, this course examines the painting (including Turner, Constable, the Pre-Raphaelites, the High Victorians), architecture, furniture, and interiors of the period, utilizing the wealth of examples in London’s museums, galleries, and buildings. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ENGL/THAR 170 – Shakespeare in London – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units
Catalog Description: Students will study several plays by William Shakespeare selected from among the current offerings by the Royal Shakespeare and other companies. Discussions will address the plays themselves, production techniques, and the audiences to whom they appeal. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study.  Students must register for ENG 170 and may submit a cross list request form to have the class listed on academic records as THAR 170.
Attributes (ENGL 170): Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course
Attributes (THAR 170): Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Introductory Course

MUHI 133/433 – Perspectives on Genius: The Life and Musical Impact of Beethoven - Professor Charlston – 6 units
Catalog Description: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), arguably one of the most famous composers of all time, is a compelling and fascinating figure in classical music. He occupies a central position as the architect of musical Romanticism and his influence continues today. In addition to studying his music from the perspective of his own time, we discuss his extraordinary creative personality and the reception of his music by subsequent composers and listeners. A number of concerts and outside visits will be organized, and students will be encouraged to attend relevant performances in London, for which they will be prepared in class. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr).
133: The course is general in scope and no prior musical knowledge will be expected.  Does not satisfy course requirements for any music major.  Not open to students who have previously received, or need to receive credit for MUHI 433.
433: The course is a seminar involving independent research.  Not open to students who have previously received credit for MUHI 133.  Prerequisite: MUHI 201 and 202

UNIC 262 – ‘The Fields Beneath’: Discovering London’s Histories – Professor Harris – 6 units
Catalog Description: This interdisciplinary course aims to give students a thorough grounding in the chronology of London’s development from Roman settlement on the periphery of Empire to 21st-century “World City.” The use of contemporary literary and visual sources will serve both to develop students’ historical imagination and to enable them critically to examine the concepts involved in the discipline of history itself. Alongside this historical approach, a theoretical examination of specific themes and topics will be used to explore the nature of “the town as palimpsest,” a layered structure in which the past is never entirely obliterated by what succeeds it. Examples of such themes and topics might include, inter alia, religious observance, theatrical presentation, immigration, commerce, domestic life, and government. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Fosdal – 3 units
Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Harris – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

 

2015-16 London Centre Course Schedule and Descriptions

Fall Term 2015

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology of London – 6 units
Catalog Description: This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ENG 189 - British and International Soccer Culture - Professor Bond - 6 units
A study of the myths, narratives, and cultural implications of the British and international football (soccer) industry, from its Victorian roots to its global present.  Analyzing the non-stop cycle of British football media as constructed narratives will help students better understand their own first-hand experience of football culture in the London area and beyond.  Students will visit stadiums, supporters’ clubs and pubs, and football museums.  Additional readings will provide students with a deeper historical understanding of the game’s cultural context and its representation in literary and popular culture.  Topics of interest will include the commercialization and globalization of football, racism and xenophobia, and the unwritten rules of the game’s culture.

ENGL 281/HIST 384- History of the Book in London - Professor Bond - 6 units
An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of the history of the book, focusing especially on London’s role as a site of book production, distribution and consumption.  Throughout the term, students will work directly with rare books at the British Library and other collections to gain hands-on knowledge of the material history of books from the 16th to the 19th Century.  In the process, we will explore how changes in technology lead to cultural changes in society more broadly, from the introduction of writing into previously oral cultures to our own digital world of iPads.

HIST 247 – Impact of Empire on Great Britain, 1815-1914 – Professor Dobbs – 6 units
Catalog Description: In 1914 the British Empire contained a population of over 400 million people and was territorially the largest empire in world history. While the British spread their ideas about government, language, religion, and culture to their colonies, Britain itself was also profoundly influenced by the colonies it ruled. This course will explore aspects of the impact of the Empire on British politics, economics, society, and popular culture during the 19th century. Among the topics to be covered are the anti-slavery movement, imperialism and new imperialism, jingoism and popular culture, economic responses, and the influence of imperialism on culture and the arts. The myriad resources of London will be used to provide specific examples of how important the Empire was in shaping British identity and institutions during the 19th century. (G&C or E) Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Global GER (01cr), Writing Intensive GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

THAR 211 – Introduction to London Theatre  – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units
Catalog Description: Introduction to a critical approach to theatrical performance.  Students read play scripts before attending a wide range of plays in a variety of performance spaces in London, working towards a developed understanding of dramatic form.  Study of literary and theatrical conventions is designed to enhance students critical sophistication. The course aims to teach students the basic vocabulary of critical terms for thinking about plays in performance and increase their awareness of how their responses may be affected by a play. The course takes advantage of performances and opportunities uniquely available in London and students are required to attend performances of the plays under study. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Fosdal – 3 units
Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Harris – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.


Winter Term 2016

ARHI 246 - 19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain – Professor Barnes – 6 units
Catalog Description: In the 19th century, Britain was at the height of her imperial and industrial powers, with a burgeoning middle class with increased spending power. Against this background, this course examines the painting (including Turner, Constable, the Pre-Raphaelites, the High Victorians), architecture, furniture, and interiors of the period, utilizing the wealth of examples in London’s museums, galleries, and buildings. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

GOVT 385 - Modern British Politics – Professor Fosdal – 6 units
Catalog Description: This course analyzes the central structures and processes of British politics, the important policy issues of recent years, British attitudes toward the political system, and critiques of British politics and history. Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

HIST 150 – Stuart England 1603-1714 – Professor Dobbs – 6 units
Catalog Description: This course explores the causes and impact of the English Civil War, the effect of the Restoration, the Glorious Revolution, and the path to the Hanoverian Succession. The economics, politics, religion, social history, and cultural aspects of the period are also studied. Visits to museums and buildings of the period are included. (E) Attributes: Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course

THAR 279 – Fringe Theatre in London – Professor Ridgers – 6 units
Catalog Description: This course will attempt to define Fringe Theatre (a movement started in 1968) and to categorize its main elements. The class shall attend a wide variety of plays and venues and come to an understanding of how the fringe has changed over the years. Discussions will address production techniques, the plays themselves, the audiences to whom they appeal, and to what extent the fringe is still an important theatrical force. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 203 – British Crime Fiction – Professor Harris – 6 units
Catalog Description: The course will offer a survey of the development of crime fiction in Britain from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Taught as a lecture/discussion class, it will also attempt to exploit the London setting to provide a physical context for some of the work under scrutiny. Students will be able to develop their analytical and writing skills, and should expect to achieve a good grasp of the characteristics of genre fiction; they should also be able to recognize the contribution that a study of these popular forms can make to developing a broader understanding of the values and concerns of the society within which they arise. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Fosdal – 3 units
Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Harris – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

 

Spring Term 2016

ANTH 372 – Urban Anthropology of London – 6 units
Catalog Description: This seminar combines a variety of methods to explore contemporary British culture. In addition to the readings and field trips, students conduct ethnographic fieldwork in London on a topic of their own interest. This may be based in a particular place or, more broadly, focus on a certain group of people. The course provides an introduction to field research methods. Throughout the term, students participate in shorter exercises designed to develop their confidence in the skills of observation, interviewing, description, and analysis. Readings on topics such as neighborhoods, social use of language, class, education, and migration experience provide a framework for understanding the detail of the individual projects. Students are expected to make presentations and participate in discussions.  Attributes: Social Science Div GER (01cr), Diversity-Dimens GER (01cr), BM Social Science (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ARHI 246 - 19th Century Art, Design, and Society in Britain – Professor Barnes – 6 units
Catalog Description: In the 19th century, Britain was at the height of her imperial and industrial powers, with a burgeoning middle class with increased spending power. Against this background, this course examines the painting (including Turner, Constable, the Pre-Raphaelites, the High Victorians), architecture, furniture, and interiors of the period, utilizing the wealth of examples in London’s museums, galleries, and buildings. Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Foundation/Gateway Course

ENGL/THAR 170 – Shakespeare in London – Professor Hoenigs – 6 units
Catalog Description: Students will study several plays by William Shakespeare selected from among the current offerings by the Royal Shakespeare and other companies. Discussions will address the plays themselves, production techniques, and the audiences to whom they appeal. Students are required to attend performances of the plays under study.  Students must register for ENG 170 and may submit a cross list request form to have the class listed on academic records as THAR 170.
Attributes (ENGL 170): Humanities Div GER (01cr), BM Humanities (01cr), Introductory Course
Attributes (THAR 170): Fine Arts Div GER (01cr), Introductory Course

MUHI 135/435 – The British Musical Renaissance: Elgar, Vaughan Williams, and Britten - Professor Charlston – 6 units
Catalog Description: An introduction to British music in the first three-quarters of the 20th century. In addition to studying major works by Elgar, Vaughan Williams, and Britten, students will explore the social and political currents as they impinged on musical life in Britain. A number of concerts and outside visits will be organized, and students will be encouraged to attend relevant performances in London, for which they will be prepared in class. A number of concerts and outside visits will be organized, and students will be encouraged to attend relevant performances in London, for which they will be prepared in class.  Attributes: Fine Arts Div GER (01cr).
135: The course is general in scope and no prior musical knowledge will be expected.  Does not satisfy course requirements for any music major.  Not open to students who have previously received, or need to receive credit for MUHI 435.
435: The course is a seminar involving independent research.  Not open to students who have previously received credit for MUHI 135.  Prerequisite: MUHI 201 and 202

UNIC 262 – ‘The Fields Beneath’: Discovering London’s Histories – Professor Harris – 6 units
Catalog Description: This interdisciplinary course aims to give students a thorough grounding in the chronology of London’s development from Roman settlement on the periphery of Empire to 21st-century “World City.” The use of contemporary literary and visual sources will serve both to develop students’ historical imagination and to enable them critically to examine the concepts involved in the discipline of history itself. Alongside this historical approach, a theoretical examination of specific themes and topics will be used to explore the nature of “the town as palimpsest,” a layered structure in which the past is never entirely obliterated by what succeeds it. Examples of such themes and topics might include, inter alia, religious observance, theatrical presentation, immigration, commerce, domestic life, and government. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 260 – British Life and Culture – Professor Fosdal – 3 units
Catalog Description: This compulsory course utilizes visiting speakers, site visits, small group fieldwork and short research projects to introduce students to contemporary life in London and the United Kingdom. Site visits usually include the Museum of London, Imperial War Museum, London Mosque, and a football match. Speakers have included religious leaders representing several different traditions and a homeless couple, among others. The course is designed so that the majority of work takes place during the single class meeting, allowing students the possibility of pursuing up to three elective courses.  Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

UNIC 264 – Internship Seminar – Professor Harris – 6 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Catalog Description: Students in the internship program participate in seminar meetings and classroom discussions.  Students are required to maintain a blog that critically reflects on their experiences and to give oral presentations to the seminar group.  Students are also required to complete written work interrogating their experiences and the broader issue of how a liberal arts-informed perspective frames one’s experience in the workplace. Attributes: Foundation/Gateway Course

MUIN 355 – London Music Lessons – Arranged – 3 units – enrollment by permission of instructor
Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to arrange lessons in London. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of instruction over the term, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Students interested in pursuing lessons should contact the Off-Campus Programs office for more information.

 

Internships

As London is a city with a wealth of opportunities, internship placements are available for students in the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. Interns spend 20 hours per week at their placements as well as participate in a 6-unit seminar with other internship students. Internship placements and coordination are facilitated by the Foundation for International Education (FIE) who arrange an orientation program for interns and conduct seminars and on-site monitoring during the course of the term.  For a listing of possible placement areas, more information on the internship program, and some thoughts from former interns, please visit the Internship page.

Music Lessons

Students who have regularly taken music lessons on-campus and who wish to continue taking lessons while in London may choose to do so. If successful in contracting for at least five hours worth of lessons, students may register for a 3-unit, S/U-only course overseen by Associate Dean Jeffrey Stannard. Costs up to $500 for these lessons will be reimbursed by the Foundation for International Education. Students interested in pursuing lessons should see this page.

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