Please note: The information displayed here is current as of Friday, September 21, 2018, but the official Course Catalog should be used for all official planning.

2013-2014 Course Catalog

Period: 2018-20192017-20182016-20172015-20162014-2015

This catalog was created on Friday, September 21, 2018.


Physics

Professor:M. Stoneking
Associate professors:J. Collett, D. Martin (on leave term(s) II, III), M. Pickett (chair)
Visiting assistant professor:M. Koker

Physics represents an inquiry, both theoretical and experimental, into the nature of the physical universe. The theoretical approach involves constructing and exploring abstract models of nature, while the experimental approach involves investigations of physical systems that provide avenues for evaluating theories and for suggesting new theories. Taken together, theory and experiment aim at the construction of a single, compact, and far-reaching conceptual framework that accounts for all properties of the physical universe.

The physics curriculum at Lawrence is structured to help the student develop a firm grasp of the important theories and a secure competence in contemporary experimental techniques. Requirements for the major reflect this structure. On the theoretical side, the major moves from a general survey to more detailed intermediate courses to advanced electives, culminating in a theoretical Senior Experience project. On the experimental side, the major moves from a study of standard techniques of data analysis to an intermediate laboratory in electronics to a project-oriented advanced laboratory, possibly culminating in an experimental Senior Experience project. Throughout the curriculum, contemporary computational approaches to problems in physics play a significant role alongside the traditional approaches.

Prospective engineers will find that a major in physics automatically fulfills nearly all of the requirements for Lawrence’s 3-2 engineering program.

Students who have strong secondary interests in biology, chemistry, or geology may construct majors involving physics and one of the other three natural sciences, using the interdisciplinary major in the natural sciences.

In addition, a minor in physics offers an opportunity for those who wish to supplement a major in another discipline with a significant exposure to physics.

Required for the physics major

PHYS 220, 225, 230, 310, 320, 330, and two additional six-unit courses chosen from PHYS 340 and above, excluding directed study, tutorial, and independent study courses taken as part of the Senior Experience or for other reasons. Physics majors without advanced placement should start with PHYS 141, 151 and 160. Majors who do not intend to pursue graduate study in physics may petition the department to substitute appropriate upper-level offerings in other departments for up to two of the required physics electives. The following program is typical:

  • Freshman: PHYS 151, 160; MATH 140, 150, 160
  • Sophomore: PHYS 220, 225, 230; MATH 210
  • Junior: PHYS 310, 320, 330; physics electives
  • Senior: PHYS 599 or 699, Senior Experience; physics electives

Additional courses in mathematics, chemistry, computer science biology, and geology are often elected. The prospective major should consult early and regularly with the faculty in the department.

Required for the interdisciplinary major in the natural sciences in physics and a secondary discipline

  1. PHYS 151 and 160
  2. Any two of
    1. BIOL 130 and 150
    2. CHEM 115 and 116 or equivalent
    3. GEOL 110 (any section) and GEOL 210
    chosen to include the secondary discipline.
  3. At least 10 six-unit courses in the sciences (biology, chemistry, geology, physics) numbered 200 or above, with at least five in physics and at least three in the secondary discipline. The five courses in physics must include PHYS 225, 230, 310, and 330.

Required for the physics minor

  1. PHYS 151 and 160
  2. PHYS 225
  3. Three additional six-unit courses in physics, at least two of which must be chosen from physics courses numbered 220 and above, excluding independent studies and capstone courses, and no more than one of which can be chosen from PHYS 103-115 and PHYS 205.
  4. C average in the minor

A student pursuing a minor in physics must consult with a member of the department early and often to plan and monitor progress in the minor.

Opportunities for non-majors

The physics curriculum offers non-majors the opportunity to take one or more terms of physics as part of their liberal education. Although every course is open to all suitably prepared students, PHYS 103, 107, 110, 112, 115, 141, 151, 160, and 220 have traditionally attracted non-majors.

The laboratory science General Education Requirement

The following courses in the physics department satisfy the university‘s degree requirement of one laboratory course in natural science: PHYS 103, 107, 110, 141, 151, 160, 220, 330.

Graduate School

Majors preparing for graduate school in physics will probably take more courses in physics than the required minimum. PHYS 430, 440, and 460 are recommended for all such students. Other departmental offerings (PHYS 340, 410, 500-570) are appropriate for students with particular interests in the topics of those courses. All students contemplating graduate studies in physics should undertake at least one term of independent study/ research in the senior year and/or seek opportunities at Lawrence or elsewhere for full-time research during the summer after the junior year. Students contemplating graduate studies in physics should discuss their plans early and often with members of the department.

Certification for secondary teaching in physics

Majors seeking certification to teach physics at the secondary level should read the section of this catalog on teacher certification and consult early and often with members of the Department of Education. Physics majors who plan to teach physics at the secondary level may petition the department to substitute physics courses numbered below 199 for the two required physics electives.

Recommended courses outside the department

Courses in mathematics, chemistry, and computer science are frequently elected to support a major in physics, but courses in geology, biology, economics, philosophy, anthropology, and other areas have occasionally been chosen by physics majors whose post-graduation objectives have an interdisciplinary dimension. With departmental approval, up to two upper-level courses in other departments may be substituted for required physics electives.

Advanced Placement

Students with strong backgrounds should seek advanced placement and credit, normally by submitting scores on the Physics Advanced Placement Examination of the Educational Testing Service. Advanced placement without credit is awarded to students who submit satisfactory evidence that they both understand most of PHYS 141 or 151 and are able to remedy weaknesses on their own initiative.

International and off-campus study

International and off-campus study The Associated Colleges of the Midwest program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is available to majors in physics. Further, with careful advance planning, physics majors at Lawrence can arrange to be off campus for a term — typically the Winter or Spring Term of the junior year — without jeopardizing progress in the major. Thus, physics majors can participate in off-campus programs, even if those programs contain no scientific components. The Lawrence London Centre, among others, has been a popular destination for physics majors.

Course Numbering

Courses of general interest requiring minimal or no prerequisite are numbered 103-115. The introductory courses, 141, 151, and 160, require elementary calculus. PHYS 141 introduces ideas in calculus together with concepts in physics. The calculus introduced in PHYS 141 will not replace any mathematics prerequisites in courses numbered 160 and higher. Intermediate courses are numbered between 200 and 300 and typically list calculus and differential equations as prerequisites. Advanced courses, many of which list one or more intermediate courses as prerequisites, are intended for juniors and seniors and are numbered above 300. Tutorial studies in physics and independent study in physics also are offered.

Senior Experience in Physics

The Senior Experience in the Department of Physics consists of an independent investigation tailored to the individual student’s goals in physics. The process consists of a formal project proposal to the Department followed by one or two six-unit independent study courses under faculty supervision and culminating in a capstone thesis paper.
All seniors will participate in a two-unit senior seminar in which they present their work orally. Students with double majors or degrees may propose initiatives that span multiple departments but both departments must approve such proposals before the project goes forward.


Courses - Physics

PHYS 107: Physics of Music

Explores the relationship between physics and music, covering such topics as vibrations, waves, interference, resonance, wave forms, scales and temperament, physics of musical instruments, characteristics of auditoriums, impact of electronics. Weekly laboratory.
Units: 6.

PHYS 110: Topics in Astronomy

Treats selected topics in astronomy and cosmology: the solar system, stellar evolution and death, black holes, galaxies, the big bang theory of the early universe. Astronomical observations are interpreted in light of known physical laws to form a comprehensible picture of the universe. No laboratory.
Units: 6.

PHYS 112: Energy Technology, Society, and the Environment

Explores energy production, storage, and usage as they are currently practiced. Certain emerging technologies will also be addressed. Environmental and socio-economic impact will be discussed in the context of limitations imposed by the laws of physics.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Environmental Studies 115

PHYS 115: Aspects of Physics

Treats topics selected for the non-scientist who wants one term of physics. In recent years, the course has sometimes focused on the nature of time and relativity. Physics 115 is not intended to serve as a general introduction to physics, as are Physics 141, 151, and 160, and does not supply an adequate background for intermediate or advanced courses.
,br> Topic for Fall 2018: The Royal Society and the Birth of Modern Science
This course will use the history of the Royal Society, founded in 1660 as the first modern scientific society, as a lens through which to view the rise of science as it is now practiced. The course will include visits to the Royal Society archives, readings of original articles from the Philosophical Transactions, and classroom discussion. Offered at the London Centre
Units: 6.

PHYS 119: Victorian Engineering

The Victorian era (1837-1901) saw tremendous advances in engineering: systems such as steam engines, steel bridges, underground railways and electrical lighting were developed or dramatically enhanced. Moreover, many of these systems are still in use in London. This course uses London as a unique laboratory to investigate classical physics through field trips to engineering edifices combined with classroom discussion to expose the underlying science.
Units: 6.

PHYS 141: Principles of Classical, Relativistic, and Quantum Mechanics

A calculus-based introduction to fundamental concepts in mechanics, from Galileo and Newton through relativity and quantum mechanics. Weekly laboratories emphasize the acquisition, reduction and interpretation of experimental data and the keeping of complete records. Explicit instruction in calculus will be provided.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: None, but calculus is recommended.

PHYS 151: Principles of Classical Physics

A continuation of Physics 141. Physics 151 offers a brief review of mechanics, and covers electricity, magnetism, circuits, waves, optics and thermal physics. Weekly laboratories emphasize the acquisition, reduction, and interpretation of experimental data and the keeping of complete records.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 141, or one year of high school physics and MATH 140.

PHYS 160: Principles of Modern Physics

Treats basic ideas developed since 1900: quantum aspects of nature, special relativity, elementary wave mechanics, atomic and nuclear structure, fundamental particles. Weekly laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 151 and MATH 150

PHYS 191: Directed Study in Physics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

PHYS 215: Newtonian Lit: Chronicles of a Clockwork Universe

Newtonian Lit is a course that investigates the connections between the literature and science of the Enlightenment, particularly with respect to contemporary notions of space and time. Students will analyze important texts from the fields of English and Physics, notably Laurence Sterne’s The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman and Isaac Newton’s Principia.
Units: 6.
Also listed as English 410
Prerequisite: ENG 150 or its equivalent, plus any introductory course in the natural sciences (e.g., PHYS 141), plus sophomore standing or consent of instructor

PHYS 220: Physical Electronics

A laboratory course covering analysis, construction, and testing of circuits used in present-day experimental research. Strict adherence to standard laboratory practice required. Two laboratories and one lecture per week. Note: To register, you must sign up with instructor.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 151 and MATH 130 or 140

PHYS 225: Computational Mechanics

Introduces symbolic and numerical computation through examples drawn mainly from classical mechanics but also from classical electromagnetism and quantum mechanics. This course emphasizes computer-based approaches to graphical visualization, the solution of ordinary differential equations, the evaluation of integrals, and the finding of roots, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 151 and MATH 210

PHYS 230: Electricity and Magnetism

Develops and explores charge and current densities, particle motions, electrostatics, magnetostatics, induction, Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves, responses of matter.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 225 and MATH 210

PHYS 310: Quantum Mechanics

Develops the theoretical framework used to describe microscopic phenomena: wave-particle duality, wave functions, states and observables, Schrödinger equation, uncertainty relations, bound states, quantum scattering, angular momentum, spin, and stationary and time-dependent perturbation theories.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 225, MATH 210, and some exposure to quantum mechanics (e.g. PHYS 160, CHEM 470)

PHYS 320: Thermal Physics

Treats elementary statistical mechanics, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics, kinetic theory, and classical thermodynamics.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 160 and 225 and MATH 210

PHYS 330: Advanced Laboratory

Independent work on experiments selected from the following areas: optical, Mössbauer, alpha, beta, gamma ray, and x-ray spectroscopy; optical double resonance; magnetic resonance; vacuum techniques; solid-state physics; laser physics; nuclear physics. Three laboratories weekly; no lectures.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 160, 220 and 225; PHYS 310 recommended

PHYS 340: Optics

A laboratory course which treats geometrical optics, interference, diffraction, polarization, and various other topics in classical and contemporary optics. Students will be exposed to the techniques of a modern atomic molecular optics (AMO) laboratory.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 160 and PHYS 225 or 230

PHYS 350: Physics on Your Feet I

This is the first part of a two-course sequence in which approaches to a wide variety of problems in all major areas of physics are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on quickly identifying relevant fundamental principles and make order of magnitude estimates.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: PHYS 225, 230 and 310

PHYS 351: Physics on Your Feet II

This is the second part of a two-course sequence in which approaches to a wide variety of problems in all major areas of physics are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on quickly identifying relevant fundamental principles and make order of magnitude estimates.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: PHYS 225, 230 and 310.

PHYS 390: Tutorial Studies in Physics

Readings of texts and/or current literature to study a topic not covered in regular offerings. Topics must be carefully defined and a bibliography assembled before permission to enroll is granted.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

PHYS 391: Directed Study in Physics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

PHYS 399: Independent Study in Physics

Theoretical or experimental independent study. A written proposal must be submitted to the department at least one term before enrolling. Recent independent studies have been undertaken in fluid mechanics, general relativity, atomic systems coupled to electromagnetic fields, phase transitions in liquid crystals, plasma physics, and robotics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

PHYS 425: Advanced Mechanics & Computational Physics

Treats various topics selected from: mechanics of rigid bodies, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations, variational principles, fluids, classical scattering, relativistic mechanics, and theory of small vibrations. In addition to analytic approaches, computational methods to solving problems are emphasized, such as finite difference and finite element methods for solving partial differential equations as well as graphical visualization techniques.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 225

PHYS 430: Advanced Electricity and Magnetism

Treats several topics selected from: multipole expansions, radiation from accelerated charges, solutions to Laplace’s equations, retarded potentials, wave guides, modern optics, and electron physics.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 230 and MATH 210

PHYS 440: Mathematical Methods of Physics

Treats several topics selected from: Fourier series and transforms, partial differential equations, special functions, numerical methods, matrix methods, calculus of variations.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 225 and MATH 210

PHYS 460: Advanced Modern Physics

Treats quantum mechanically various topics selected from atomic and nuclear physics. This course will concentrate on properties of atoms and nuclei, atomic and nuclear structure, the deuteron, nucleon-nucleon scattering, nuclear models, and nuclear decay. Six supplemental laboratory exercises that focus on laser spectroscopy will be arranged.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 310 and MATH 210

PHYS 500: Special Topics in Physics

Treats selected topics, such as relativity, fundamental particles, fluid mechanics, and surface physics that vary according to the interests of students and staff.

Topic for Fall 2018: General Relativity
This course will explore General Relativity, “one of the greatest triumphs of the human mind.” Along the way, students will come to an appreciation for and understanding of this phrase and of the physics it describes, as well as black holes, event horizons, gravitational waves, and the cosmic microwave background. Prerequisite: PHYS 230, MATH 210
Units: 6.

PHYS 560: Topics in Astrophysics

Treats selected topics in astrophysics and cosmology, such as orbital mechanics, stellar structure and evolution, galactic dynamics, the origin and evolution of the Universe.
Units: 6.
Prerequisite: PHYS 225 and PHYS 230

PHYS 570: Biological Physics

Develops and explores the physical principles underlying biological systems, with a particular emphasis on building quantitative models. Applies fundamental topics including thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, elasticity, and electrostatics to model molecular and cellular phenomena such as gene expression, virus assembly, DNA bending and stretching, and nerve impulses.
Units: 6.
Also listed as Biology 570
Prerequisite: PHYS 151, and one of PHYS 230, CHEM 252, CHEM 340, or BIOL 354

PHYS 590: Tutorial Studies in Physics

Readings of texts and/or current literature to study a topic not covered in regular offerings. Topics must be carefully defined and a bibliography assembled before permission to enroll is granted.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

PHYS 591: Directed Study in Physics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

PHYS 599: Independent Study in Physics

Theoretical or experimental independent study. A written proposal must be submitted to the department at least one term before enrolling. Recent independent studies have been undertaken in fluid mechanics, general relativity, atomic systems coupled to electromagnetic fields, phase transitions in liquid crystals, plasma physics, and robotics.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

PHYS 650: Senior Seminar in Physics

This course is a weekly seminar during which physics majors in their final year work on and deliver oral presentations based on their senior experience study projects.
Units: 2.
Prerequisite: Limited to physics majors in their final year who have completed (or are currently conducting) a senior experience independent study project

PHYS 690: Tutorial Studies in Physics

Readings of texts and/or current literature to study a topic not covered in regular offerings. Topics must be carefully defined and a bibliography assembled before permission to enroll is granted.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

PHYS 691: Directed Study in Physics

Directed study follows a syllabus set primarily by the instructor to meet the needs or interests of an individual student or small group of students. The main goal of directed study is knowledge or skill acquisition, not research or creative work.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

PHYS 699: Independent Study in Physics

Theoretical, experimental and/or computational independent study. Projects undertaken in satisfaction of the senior experience requirement in physics use this designation. A written proposal must be submitted to the department at least one term before enrolling.
Units: 1 TO 98.
Prerequisite: Counter Registration Required.

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